New answers tagged

1

The small duct will not make your fan "useless". However, the fan will not perform to its published air handling or noise specifications. Further, its lifetime may (or may not) be diminished and its warranty might be voided. Buy from a seller with a liberal return policy, try it, and return if you are not satisfied with the result. Another ...


0

You should aim for two layers of continuous below the ditra, 3/4+1/2" for the best chance at controlling movement, the top 1/2" should only be screwed into the layer below without penetrating the joist. If you need to add some additional height you can use Ditra XL as well.


2

Removing wall paper can be a major pain in the posterior at best. With plaster on top it may be a nightmare, if doable. You could try it in a small test area. It may be? easier and or less time consuming to skim coat a new layer of mud and sand smooth, but that requires skill that a DIY'er may not have (but with practice could do). Maybe remove the dry ...


1

Given the amount you want to raise the floor I'd suggest 2x1" planks screwed to each joist (+0.75") with the 3/4" on top of that (+0.75"). You should then put a sheet of 1/4" ply on top. This way if you ever need to remove the tiles / ditra you only need to tear up the 1/4" ply and can leave the 3/4" floor intact. Also, ...


2

I am trying to figure out if this pipe is the vent from the main drain. It is a vent, it is coming off of the top of a sanitary tee so it is a vent for a fixture (Bathroom sink) that would be attached to the SanTee. The pipe coming form the bottom of the SanTee is the drain for a fixture that would be attached to it. The hole in the floor should be the ...


2

i see no problems other than the new fan may have some tabs that fold out to install it above the drywall and with 2 layers, they may not work right. add some blocking and prepare to drill your own install holes in the metal housing of the fan........Maybe :)


3

I don’t see any problem, with multiple changes I believe it is a better way to go. Even using an electric blower to move cellulose when I pulled it down there was still a mess. The others we did were overlays. In a bathroom is 1 place I suggest using hot mud or setting compound for those new to Sheetrock. Hot mud is affected less by moisture than standard ...


3

A couple of options 1 Look for metal legs for example these (perhaps too ornate) ones 2 a pair of legs made custom for those large square holes near the front. Either way add basin brackets with spacers at A plus adhesive at B. You need front legs. People will lean or even sit on it.


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It will quite possibly ruin the waterproofing layer under the tile. It is best to let it set up, roughen the glossy surface of the tile and set new tile directly over the first. There will most likely need to be an extension ring added to the drain to get it to the new level.


5

This appears to be very shoddy workmanship. I can't tell a lot about how plumb the walls may or may not be but the wallboard has to be done properly in order to get good results once the tile is applied. However, it doesn't appear the tiler is very knowledgeable or skilled with properly installing tile. He/she should be using spacers between all of those ...


3

The pressure may be slightly reduced while in use. Most homes have at least 1/2” plumbing and the sink cartridges usually have ~1/8” orifices in the faucet on each side so if you turn all 4 on at the same time you probably will notice a difference but not a significant one. Now a tub faucet that would be a different answer.


0

The says, “Every dwelling unit shall be provided with a water closet, lavatory and a bathtub or shower.”(See ICC R306.1) However, it doesn’t say every bathroom shall be provided with a lavatory. If you do provide a toilet, lav, tub, etc. they shall meet the clearances shown in Figure R307.2.


1

Looks like a Price Pfister (or import copy thereof). Looks like a good quality faucet that is worth saving. Note- you don't necessarily need to buy new "cartridges", these are totally rebuild-able unless physically damaged. The washers and o-rings should be readily available at a good hardware shop or plumbing shop (maybe not at big-box center). ...


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What does waterproof the pluming mean? Plumbing is designed to keep the water on the inside of pipes. If there is a leak in a pipe then the pipe should be repaired. He was also unsure he was allowed to waterproof inside the stack. Is this correct? We can not say what the plumber can or can not do. Waterproofing the inside of pipes is not normally done ...


2

You should be able to turn that brass colored knob counterclockwise and remove it from the stem or have the stem turn too and remove it from the diverter plate which should then drop out of the spout. Then examine it for any signs of corrosion or cracking. If damaged, a trip to a plumbing supply store might just do the trick for a replacement. You have to ...


1

If you can’t get the tail out of the basin pop up /drain stopper you may need to replace the entire drain assembly. Don’t panic only about 12.00$ at the big orange home store “pop up assembly” by easy flow is one inexpensive one that will work. First remove the drain pop up lever unscrew the plastic and pull the rod out the back. the rod is held in place by ...


1

I believe you are describing hollow wall anchors. Molly screw is a common brand name that has come to be reference for almost any hollow wall anchor. I think you have half the removal process. You need to install a screw then gently tap it with a hammer. This will straighten out the insert allowing it to come out thru a hole slightly larger than the ...


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I got mine out with a strong kitchen knife screw was under the blue plastic


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My 2 cents: Mine didn't line up. I did the following, but check for your local code....


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You're going to have to use an AAV... S-traps have long ago been illegal for the siphon issue that you mentioned.


2

Depends how it was installed. In many cases, the "standard procedure" is to cut the concrete open so you can get the "roughed in" (i.e. roughly positioned) pipes connected to exactly where you want them. Depending exactly WHAT was roughed in, you might need to do that so there IS a trap on the shower, for instance. The roughed in pipe may ...


5

I think it is in theory possible for a device like this to be designed and certified as a shaver socket in the UK. I don't think having output voltage of 5V (or 9, etc) would disqualify it. I do not however think this particular device has been designed or certified to "shaver socket" standards for use in a bathroom and I don't think such a thing ...


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