New answers tagged

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In terms of water ingress into the stud space, the tub surround will be 1/4in high on the sides of the tub, but the lip of the tub stands high enough to lip behind the surround. You can check this by measuring the height of the tub's lip and comparing to the "droop" of the tub. However, you might have water standing at the lip if the current slope ...


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Most toilets have the cistern attached to the bowl so there's no pipe needed. This particular type has the cistern separated from the bowl so that pipe feeds water into the top of the bowl from the cistern to start the flush. You'll find a supply line that feeds the cistern around there.


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I'd try to raise the back edge 1/4" to level the tub and then pack in mortar underneath both sides as far as I could get it in. Possibly install a few shim strips to fill the gap. Those surrounding tile stalls really do need a level tub or you'll need to shim the wall.


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Never fear, Insteon's here! Most smart-switches can only control something that has wires back to the switch point, and take up a full gang of space. However, the Insteon system, as the spiritual descendant of X10, is capable of using ceiling modules that talk to Insteon switches over powerline or wireless communications to remotely control loads. So, I'd ...


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New answer: To control your heater, use a smart line voltage thermostat. Usually the heater has a separate circuit (or should).


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You could install a smart socket at the heater location rather than a smart switch at the switch location for the heater. Get rid of the wall switch for the heater and just use your app. Then you have a full two-gang box to control three lighting circuits. It should be easier to find things that fit and you don't need a relay. In the switch box, when you ...


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From "boiler", "mains" and "electric shower" I gather you are in UK-influenced areas. I am looking for non fossil fuel heating for space and water. We want to keep the same pressure we get off mains as we do not like the low flow rate with electric showers. OK, seems like a bit of a values conflict, environmentalism without ...


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Consider the physics: condensation happens where surface temperature is below the dew point of adjacent air. Dew point is related to relative humidity, so we control the relative humidity by controlling the amount of water in the air and/or by controlling the temperature of the air and surfaces. You've planned for a vent fan, which controls the amount of ...


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Move to an area served by a nuclear power station and your electric instant water heater will be "non fossil fuel". Probably not what you're looking for. Move to an area with an abundant supply of geothermal energy. I don't know if there are home geothermal systems that can do instant hot water. I don't think so. But it's worth a look. More ...


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Heating of water requires energy, and instantaneous heating of water requires instantaneous energy. In a residential setting usually gas and commercial electricity are the only available sources of instantaneous and "endless" energy to support indefinite/continuous water heating. Eliminating use of fossil fuel can be easy: use a heater fueled by ...


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These spouts are all fairly standard no matter the brand. It should unscrew counter-clockwise. Most that I've seen don't have set screws. If yours has one but it is missing there shouldn't be a problem unscrewing the faucet from the wall stub although it could be a little stubborn. They often get corroded so you may want to spray some WD40 or another ...


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Can't tell what's above the room, but if possible, a ceiling vent would be a good idea. As far away from the fan as possible - and it wouldn't look out of place, would save the door, and be simple to change with a piece of plasterboard later if needed.


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Remove all the pipework bits, as they need to come off to allow the body to be removed from the worktop anyway. Deep sockets are a solution - but likely expensive and may not be easy to find. I made one using some old pipe of a suitable diameter and a file. Did not take long and worked well - those nuts are usually not too tight. A plan B is to use a drill ...


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Probably not grit but calcium deposits that collect in the mechanism.


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I have never seen a drain assembly like the one you have but it probably unscrews from the top. If there is a name on the sink check with them to see if you need a special tool to remove part of the drain assembly from above.


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Rusty steel tubs tend to get worse, not better, nor even stop where they are. When it inevitably rusts more, you'll be ripping out any tiling you do now as well as the old tub. You can certainly try various rust-treatment nostrums, but I'd suggest just facing the tub replacement now as the more certain path to a tile job that can stay put on a tub that's not ...


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It might be marketing, or it might be fact (or both!) but caulking that's designed specifically for kitchen/bath applications has an anti-microbial element. Assuming your existing roofing caulk isn't too old, it would probably work. It might stink more than expected for a little while. If it was me, I'd get a fresh tube of kitchen/bath silicone from a place ...


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The exhaust fan for your shower in a bathroom that size should be about 1-2 feet outside the shower. It's just too far away there. I am sure someone theorized that the middle was better but people take more showers than baths and showers produce more steam. The fan is just in the wrong place.


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Assumptions: One blue/white pair entering this box is power, the other goes to the lights. Per your comments the "lights" one is the one with the red wire. You connected the lights to the LOAD side of the GFCI when you removed the dimmer, so they are permanently on now. If the assumptions are wrong so is my answer. But if they are wrong, I can'...


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Add a picture or drawing of what you propose. If the side of the cabinet restricts the air flow around the radiator, you will get less heat from the radiator. A picture of the room is needed. As far as that being a code violation, codes change all the time and by location. Check with a local contractor.


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Looks like you already have two separate exhaust fans. You could try consolidating and adding a vent right above the shower enclosure by installing a powerful enough (i.e., enough CFM) in-line bath fan. You would have 3 ducts feeding into a single fan with one single exhaust duct to the outside. Rigid ducting for greatest efficiency though it may sound ...


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Another exhaust fan. If you can easily approach from above, put another exhaust fan on the ceiling inside your shower. All showers in this house have one. You have 2 exhaust fans already in the bathroom so your new fan could share some of the duct with one of them, or you can cut another hole. It will pull air thru into the shower and out which is ideal. ...


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