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NEC Section 424.3(A) Branch Circuit Requirements. ....Branch circuits supplying two or more outlets for fixed electric space-heating shall be rated not more than 30 amperes.... NEC 424.3(B)Branch circuit sizing. Fixed...shall be considered continuous load. Continuous load means load no more than 80% of circuit rating, so a 20A circuit can't be more than ...


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No, every hardwired appliance does not need to be on its own circuit. But... Provision power for heaters with a 125% derate You need to study the unit's specs carefully, and note the amps or VA drawn by it (note a resistive electric heating element will have VA identical to Watts, but a fan motor may knock that off a little). Then, multiply that figure ...


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This is a faucet that is designed to install from the top only. Price Pfister calls it Top Pfit. The piece you have pictured was probably over tightened, bent, and popped off. It works like a toggle bolt. It lines up with the pipe to slip into the sink hole then it flops down to a horizontal position where you use a nut or screw on the top side to ...


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It looks like a gravity toggle. If so it's holes should fit over the lugs of the nut part having its arched part facing down.


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You do want to move the heater, you can raise the height that won’t be a problem as far as height 6’7” is the maximum height for a disconnecting means so I think you will be fine. It looks like that cadet has the thermostat on the unit but the door being directly in front of it over time would cook the paint or finish and damage the door a little each time ...


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Do not cover that heater and a 1/2” gap is not sufficient either. You will have to move it or re-design your door.


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You should be able to turn the clamp nut by the wall... ...which will allow the horizontal portion of the drain connection to pull out of the wall. It may have enough slide connection so it can be reclamped to use the existing pipe to reach the new down spout on the sink. If it is not long enough then you will need to purchase new parts to achieve a ...


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Where the bench meets the base it's the same as where the wall meets the base. so there's not going to be a problem there.


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It should be fine as-is, after-all a bath full of water weighs about as much as a waterbed, and there are no special requirements for framing under bathrooms. (unless you want to lower the floor)


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Structurally, in a word, you need to consider support. The joists alone will likely not be enough to support the added weight over time. They will start to sag. You may be able to get away with a single pillar support, and double up the spans. Or you may be able to put in two or even three supports in the area. It is hard to say without seeing the layout. ...


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In addition to Ed's good ideas, it's common to just frame and drywall a box around the duct, which you'd drop below the joists near a wall where it's out of the way. Basements across the Midwest have primary HVAC ducts boxed in this manner. Image source and more info


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This sounds like the float valve inside the toilet might be allowing the water to drain down the overflow tube. Normally, the float will stop the water before it gets to the top of the overflow, but if the float is leaking or out of adjustment, the water can spill over the top. When water leaks into the overflow, it goes into the tank, and when it goes ...


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I think you're hearing pipe creaking due to thermal expansion. If it was leaking that much you'd know it due to moisture and mold. Here's what's happening: You flush the toilet. Cold water flows through the pipes to the tank, contracting the pipe. Where it makes firm contact with the wall framing it creaks at regular intervals, slowing and then stopping ...


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It appears that your wall is failing. Whatever those tile are, they weren't intended for bathroom use. You can scrap off the loose particles and then apply a thin layer of caulk or sealer to the area to prevent you from inhaling the dust. How many tiles you're taking about. Other than that, you're going to have to plan on redoing the walls. The tiles will ...


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As far as I see it, you have 3 options: Buy a longer curtain, it may be too long, which is fine. You can bring this curtain to just about any seamstress and they will cut it down and hem the bottom for a "factory" look at whatever height you want. Try to find longer/larger rings. This may not be possible to get exactly the size you want, but it could get ...


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Get a second shower rod that's white and tension adjustable so no new holes. Install it below the existing one and reverse the existing hoops so the round part has the rod passing through it and the small dip holds the curtain. See example below.


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I would buy a second set of those white plastic loops and drop the curtain down easily that way.


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Pattern cracking (alligatoring) can be caused by: 1) applying a hard coat (oil base) over a softer coat of paint. 2) applying too much paint per coat. 3) applying one coat over another coat before the first coat can dry...often because the first coat is too thick. 4) inability of top coat by to bond smoothly to glossy finish. Repair is by: A) ...


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That could be an indication of moisture behind the wall trying to escape. When you put on the BIN shellac, you basically sealed the moisture in, so it's blistering the shellac. Similar things can happen if you paint over latex paint with oil, IIRC.


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Oh, you definitely want a bathroom fan even if you have a window. There are two reasons you want to ventilate a bathroom, one is humidity from the shower. The "open window" method is not reliable for removing humidity, and that gets you mold. As for the other reason, half the time air blows in through the window, pushing bathroom air into the rest of the ...


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Absolutely buy an expensive fan, one with good bearings and a big motor. They are far quieter than the cheapies. You won't use a bath fan if the noise is deafening.


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The code requires an exhaust fan of 80 cfm for bathrooms with a tub, shower or spa. (See ICC M1507.) For bathrooms without a tub, shower or spa a window of 3 square feet (of which half must open) may be provided. (See ICC R303.3)


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When they were first required by code is one thing, but finding out when people first decided to use a fan to help bathroom ventilation is another - the saying "necessity is the mother of invention" is very apt...


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I don't know when it became a requirement but building codes came into effect in 1955. If they were installed then it was by choice since no rule existed before then, that I know of. If an old code book can be found particular to you area, then it could be determined. But back in the day, the code was different area by area. Not greatly but small differences ...


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OK, you had me at "a bulge with cracking". This is a little scary. Even though you don't feel any moisture doesn't mean it's not pooling on the top and rotting the wood. Tubs are heavy and tubs filled with water are a lot heavier. I really think you need to check into this a whole lot more unless you want a tub in the basement. You mentioned LVT flooring in ...


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Caulking and mold; Caulking that lasts needs more prep time than the actual application of caulking. My experience with caulking repairs is that mold typically forms in voids * where caulking is missing, * or has delaminated from the surface, * ---OR if someone didn't kill and remove the old mold first before simply just gushing on new caulking! The ...


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To me this sounds like a bad connection. My first look is for backstabs prior to the switch or at the switch, it can also be a broken wire sometimes a Knick on the wire when striped the wire can break over time, and last a wire not fully in a wire nut. All of these can show full voltage without a load but once a load (the light) is added it opens. I see ...


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The code is a bit nit-picky on this, with a likely unintended consequence. First a little clarification of definitions in the NEC, a Receptacle means a receptacle, an Outlet is any point of connection of utilization equipment (fans, wall heaters, towel warmers). NEC 210.11(C)(3)Bathroom Branch Circuits...at least one 120-volt 20-ampere branch circuit shall ...


2

Electronic timer not required They also make clockwork timers which are simpler to wire. The difference being your wrist powers the clockwork, whereas a neutral wire powers the electronic job. Regardless, the timer will need to be placed on the LOAD side of the GFCI. That means you need to get hot and neutral correct. I don't see a problem with the ...


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Your #1 and #2 have a deep relationship so let's answer those together. Your GFCI has a LINE and a LOAD side. The LOAD side is protected by the GFCI. As long as your electrical device is not in an area it would directly come into contact with water (i.e. inside the shower/tub), and is attached to the LOAD side of the GFCI, it is compliant. In other words, it ...


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The seams between walls and between walls and floor should not be grouted. There is always movement when planes change and that will crack grout. Clean out all the grout as Jimmy suggested. Then apply a quality silicone caulk at the corner of wall to wall and also to wall the floor. Caulk is flexible and will resist cracking whereas grout will not.


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I would venture to guess that originally the shower had a properly waterproofed substrate; the common inspector's test requires plugging the drain and filling the pan with water for a period, checking for water level change. There may be concern now, because cracked and failing grout can be a sign of movement (there are, however, other possible causes of ...


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I did exactly what u describe. Take a circular saw with a diamond blade and cut into the concrete on the outside of the pipesize. Small increments at a time. Cut the complete depth of the blade. Than take a concrete hammer and get rid of the inside between ur two cuts. If u have to go deeper just continue with the hammer. Add the pipe and new metal ...


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You might be best to just by a new one, however, one thing you could try is some plumbing tape (PTFE tape, or Teflon Tape). This tape is generally used to help seal screw connections on plumbing but could provide the extra grip between the threads needed to keep it connected.


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The temperature limiter is a TMV or Thermostatic Mixing Valve. It will have two inlets and one outlet. One inlet is for hot, and the other is for cold. So, it would appear that what you have is two colds and one hot. The cold water pipe is probably split somewhere before you see it coming out to supply the cold side of the faucet and the TMV. The inlet ...


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Get some fireblocking foam and fill the hole Since the thing on the other side of the wall with the hole in it is your garage, IRC R302.5.3 kicks in, which requires penetrations in the house-garage wall to be sealed in accordance with R302.11, item 4, which in turn requires an approved fireblocking material to be used for the job, albeit not necessarily ...


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https://www.amazon.com/Intermatic-SW15MK-15-Minute-Spring-Wound/dp/B00LBHBPKK We use Intermatic switches, which withstand decades of customer abuse. Not as cool, but reliable and effective


4

What you want is possible, but requires an extra box While button-type (electronic) countdown timers that can switch 240V directly aren't a thing due to the limited market they would have; this is still possible provided neutral is available to the timer and you are OK with an extra box hanging around. In particular, what you can do is use a suitable timer ...


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We put mirrors in a bathroom years ago and varnished the edges and back of each mirror with 2 good coats of varnish. They eventually failed - time and the temperature / humidity cycles take their toll. If you can get a replacement mirror now then get two and keep one for the future.


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I would use a clear varnish. Varnish has very little body and would seal the edge where the glass and metalized layer are exposed. By sealing this edge moisture can not get in and start delaminating the new mirror. If you want something with more body use a silicone sealer. Both should work well to prevent your new mirror from having issues with the moisture....


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You can apply thinset over the RedGard and prime and paint over that. Joint compound is reactivated when it absorbs water and can cause problems like mold and blistering or delamination of paint film.


1

You can first try removing the wire spring clip from the stem and then try to turn the bonnet nut assembly. If the whole unit still turns then keep the unit from turning by using channel lock pliers or vise grip to hold the unit in place. Make sure to use a towel to protect the threads. Once the bonnet nut is remove then twist out the valve stem.


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