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I have the elbow on the left and is impossible to feed the plumbing snake in the hole as the middle part is obstructing it. Is it possible to covert the single screw to double screw as shown on the right side ?


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Repair That most likely cannot be safely repaired. Usually parts of the case interlock to keep out water. In theory, if the manufacturer would supply a replacement housing, a competent person could transplant the parts but I doubt anyone would ever do that. That's not an expensive unit to replace. Some Mira showers did have an easily replaceable lower ...


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It might be possible to get a replacement plastic part from somewhere like Shower Doc, but it's your landlady's responsibility to pay for the work and get it done by a qualified tradesperson, immediately.


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After you've undone the plumbing below, I'd use quick support rods or 2x4s cut a little long to push up on the bottom of the sink and help to lift it out. While the quick rods are pushing up use a long knife and slice any silicone that is holding the sink to the counter. If you use the quick support rod then you can just turn the rod to increase the force ...


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What jurisdiction is this located in? In most places in the US it is illegal for a non-licensed person to do electrical work in a rental. Technically even buying a part for this device and replacing it would be a violation and absolutely repairing the circuit board in it would be a repair and thus illegal if you tried doing it. And if your idea is you are ...


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Since the old sink is cracked just use a sledge hammer to break it into small pieces which can then easily be levered off the glue joints.


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Use a long sharp knife, like a carpet/flooring knife, to slice through the caulking or construction adhesive that was used on the top of the vanity when the sink was set onto it. Then yes, use a lifting/prying strategy that minimizes potential for damage to the cabinet. You may need to slice, lift a little, slice some more, lift a little more, slice...


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I have found (over many years and snaking hundreds of drains) that the ability to get past a bend in the line is directly related to your technique (read, experience) and the tool you are using. Cheap cables are prone to flex too much and are difficult to get around some bends, especially if you've kinked it (although I keep a few cheap ones, I call them &...


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Aah, plumbers. Google instructions on 'framing an attic hatch'. At a minimum, you want the cut joist to T into something across the two good joists. You also want to put short joists (going in the same direction as the rest of the joists) as close to the plumbing as practical to support the edge of the flooring. If you already have a compressor available, a ...


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If you can figure out your design precisely - length, width, any odd corners, sinks, etc. - then I suggest taking a look at "solid surface" such as "cultured marble". Essentially some sort of resin with color and "stuff" mixed in. Reasonably hard - but not as hard or as heavy as stone (granite, quartz, etc.) and can be ordered ...


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I don't think you can get high-quality and lightweight in the same package. Granite, quartz, marble, concrete, and the like are high-quality materials more or less for the same reasons they're really heavy. Because they're all more or less rock, they have a certain level of durability that you're not going to get from other materials. But if you don't have ...


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autobody filler might work out you can put a real thin layer of it then sculpt it with a sander then finish it off with enamel paint, assuming this is a fiberglass pan. Make sure you don't create a slippery surface though. Another way would be to remove the glass wall and completely resculpt this with filler than put down tile mastic and tile it with ...


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You'll get water. I've dealt with an older house where the main feed was dropped to 1/2" and they got water. Mind you, I replaced the 1/2" with 1" when I got to working on the water system in that house, and water delivery improved. But it's more a matter of what you're willing to live with, and how well it works, not complete failure to work. ...


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Not a calculated method, but if that home is yours and you're planning to spend a good few years in it, I would put in the 1" main PEX to water heater and as you go to edge water outlets of the house, convert that 1" to 3/4". The cost of 1" vs 3/4" isn't too drastic and having the extra capacity, especially to the water heater will ...


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That looks like fairly typical old toilet guts. You should be able to replace with any "standard" kit - Fluidmaster, Danco, etc. The parts are actually (a bit surprisingly) very much standardized. I suggest making sure it is a kit that is adjustable to handle the old (water wasting) and new (low flow) toilets. 1993 was in the middle of the ...


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You can but you might not want to. PEX pipe being dirt cheap, it's common to "home run" back to the source, minimizing the effect of one use point drastically affecting the water pressure on another use point. On the other hand, if you make the assumption that this bathroom will only be used by one person at a time, you can choose to discount the ...


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I did something similar in my son's tiny house. But I did an individual run to each item (kitchen sink, toilet, shower and bathroom sink) to limit the joints used to the ends only. Much easier not to worry about leaks hidden in walls (just have to remember if fixing things with screws). The professional plumber looked and said that was what he would do as ...


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You shouldn't be seeking out that connector. The problem is, you have not removed the fan. You've removed only part of the fan assembly. The thing that plugs into is more parts of the fan assembly. Remove it too. That particular fan is designed to break into halves: there's the half that mounts in the ceiling (first) and then half that latches into it once ...


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First, the model number is WL8-500P. I was able to get the installation document from PP that showed all the pieces. The t-connector is held on by a metal omega spring clip, which I had already removed, and friction between the connector and two internal o-rings. I didn't have to remove the "plug" but I did add a lot of penetrant and banged with a ...


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Job water weld around the pipe where hole in wall is.


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I'd be inclined to take a closer look at the suspected leak area. It's unlikely that you're getting enough water through the grouted joints to leak a noticeable amount of water into the floor below. What I would suspect is you have a bathtub without an integral flange and the joint where the tile meets the tub is compromised or not properly sealed with ...


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That sounds like a longer lasting solution than duck-taping a couple of shower curtains up. Remember that a shower curtain protects the floor outside the tub from getting wet, so I'd think this should work just fine as a one-year-or-so "temporary" solution. Make sure that you overlap the sheeting onto the surface of the tub. It could be that there ...


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That whole tee piece needs to come off, then there is a hex shaped nut under it that holds the spout assembly to the sink. It's often a 2-person job because the force needed to remove the tee piece and nut after its been on there so long can cause the spout itself to turn. So... someone needs to hold the spout up top while another removes the plug (which ...


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Yes. That's how it's supposed to be. You have water coming out by the tube which has the on/off mechanism and a small flexible pipe that is expected to send water inside the overflow tube to refill the bowl. Without that, the bowl is not likely to refill much, actually. I uploaded a video on YouTube to show it in action.


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This gets into an interesting discussion as to when something has to be "brought up to code". This might be worth its own question/thread, but I'll put it out here anyway. In many areas (your mileage may vary), your local jurisdiction/inspector may require that as part of a major remodel of a bathroom or kitchen for example, that the bathroom/...


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Codes differ between areas and across time. The International Residential Code requires SOME form of venting, either a fan exhausting to the outside with at least 50CFM or a window with at least 1-1/2 sq. ft. of opening area. Whether or not your locality adopted those standards at the time your condo was built is not something we can help with. But code or ...


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Tiled walls aren't waterproof. the individual tiles are waterproof but the grout always leaks. this is why a waterproof membrans is applied behind the tiles in wet areas. A propper fix involves removing the tiles and sealing the pipe to the waterproof membrane behind the tiles. maybe you can get in there with the spout removed and stop it up enough with a ...


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That is too large of a gap to seal with caulk. If you are looking for a (very) temporary solution you would be better off with plumber's putty. Get a tub of putty (it is not expensive) and knead it well until it is warm and soft, then pack the void with it. It should do a fair job of keeping the water out for awhile, until a proper repair can be completed. ...


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That is not a bathroom crevice that is a canyon. You can not stop water from flowing in a canyon unless you build a big ass dam. But before that WTF is going on in that tub? HOLY SH!T was my reaction. Nice tile, good quality tub (I can tell its cast iron) and egregious small mistakes. WOW!! Let me give you the John Madden teleprompter rundown. #1 - ...


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what is that called? The true name is escutcheon, the common name is pipe flange or trim flange. Those escutcheons are typically designed to gently grip the pipe with small bendy metal tabs that are part of the escutcheon. Other (better quality) ones have a set-screw that holds them to the pipe. The bendy tabs on yours are probably now ineffective and your ...


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This is what I ended up using. I got them at a store in the UK called ToolStation. Here are the contents of the box. The only thing I needed was the light itself (lower left); all of the other stuff is waste.


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I am generally apprehensive about fixing tile directly to gypsum wallboard, and recommend using cement board if you have the choice. It is imperative that you do not use wallboard in a wet location. That being said, I have seen tile attached to wallboard work perfectly well in locations with low moisture and where any rough use (impact) is not likely. As for ...


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Hold on there. The fan was designed to have the motor replaced, that's why there is an AC socket there. And only one screw was used for the motor. You may be able to buy a replacement motor, or more likely, the same model fan with a higher CFM motor. Take the motor out of the new fan and put it in your old box.


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Do you see the ceiling joist? Most likely the fan is fastened to the joist with nails. There's probably some "ears" on the housing where it's nailed to the joist. You should be able to pry the fan housing away from the joist. If you're careful you should be able to remove it without any major damage to the ceiling. Turn off the breaker and ...


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You will most likely have to open the ceiling, remove the fan housing which was presumably nailed or screwed in place from the outside before the ceiling was fitted, install the new fan and repair the ceiling. Drywall repair is a fact of life for getting things done, many times.


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Yes, these cartridges typically come in pairs, where one they rotate in opposite directions to each other. Often they are colour-coded, too, I imagine your plumber simply fitted red in hot, blue in cold, which suggests your taps are fitted reversed to what is considered 'normal'. There is no reason not to simply swap the cartridges over so that they rotate ...


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I've typically seen faucet handles configured in one of two ways. For radially symmetric "knob" type handles, both may be set up so that the behave like common screws - righty tighty (off), lefty loosey (on). For "lever" type taps like the one linked in the OP's comments, it may be more common to have both handles rotate "in" ...


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Another picture. You don't need to insert the screwdriver too much into the opening--maybe 1/4 inch.


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Thanks for everyone's input. Kohler was little help, but I used a Philips screwdriver and it does in-fact twist it off. You don't need to insert the screwdriver too much into the opening--maybe 1/4 inch. Just turn counter clockwise and it will push the toggle bolt off from underneath. enter image description here


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