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Yes. It looks like the fan has 2 lights, one fed by the blue wire and the other fed by the orange wire. You can disconnect the blue, orange or both from the fan remote, and connect it instead to the red wire from your switch. If you move only one of them, the one not moved will still be under the control of the remote. You may notice if you walk into any ...


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To clarify: Right now, you have one switch controlling the master fan control and then upper light, lower light and fan on/speed/off are all controlled by remote, correct? If so, you might be able to control upper light, lower light or both (simultaneously, not independently) with the other switch, or possibly each light separately, depending on: Is it ...


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We can't tell for sure why the fan switches on on its own, but one possibility is that there is a different remote control within range, e.g. a neighbour's as you already allude to. Most likely you do not have climb to the fan and open it. You can change the frequency of the remote control following the description in the installation manual. The fan's ...


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Conventional US terminology is that a black/white/ground cable is referred to as a 2-wire or /2 and a black/white/red/ground cable is referred to as a 3-wire or /3. That is because grounds are always (in normal residential fixtures, switched, etc.) (a) always present (except in very old houses or metal conduit) and (b) always all connected together. ...


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While I can't speak to the general case, the new scheme works for the Hampton Bay EF200D and the 4-lead capacitor. After connecting the new switch according to the new scheme, the fan steps through appropriate speeds as the switch cycles and there have been no electrical issues.


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