New answers tagged

1

The conduits will bend even if rigid, if thin wall or emt they are easily bent into place. I pull my wiring out and mark with a paint pen or sharpie stripes take a picture or draw a schematic black wire 1 has 1 stripe white wire 1 has 1. Red 1 has 1 then black 2 has 2 etc. normally not more than 5 in a box keeps from having so many stripes). Power off of ...


3

Overstuffed and undergrounded Your first problem is that a pair of 12/2 UF lines simply won't fit in a ¾" schedule 40 PVC conduit. Encore Wire's UF specsheet says that their 12/2 cable is 0.195" by 0.415", or 4.95 by 10.5 mm when converted to metric. However, NEC Chapter 9 Note 9 says that we need to use the width of the cable as our ...


2

Some tips here on the types of utilities beneath those marks Red is usually power, and the power company provides buried wires (not cable) in most cases. It will likely be 2/0 or 1/0 direct bury wire and there should be three of them (two 100+ amp legs and a neutral). Code mandates they be buried 18-24" deep. Yellow is typically natural gas. Depending ...


23

Crossing existing utilities is no problem; it happens all the time. Just be careful when digging. There is probably a prescribed margin to either side of the marks within which digging must be done with "hand tools only." In some areas the margin is 24 inches to either side (48 inches plus the width of the marks themselves); in other areas it is 18 ...


9

You can put your new underground line at that location. Where it may get tough is the depth of the trench: if the existing lines are just at 18 or 24”, depending on your run. If you are using UF you need 24” of cover, if conduit 18” or dig under the existing services. Be cautious, as I have had markings be over a foot off and the lines be shallower than code ...


7

Think aluminum Since you are concerned about costs, I would try to nudge you off novices' preconceptions about copper vs aluminum wire. Novices tend to "stay with what they know" (having worked with copper in 15/20A branch circuits), and tend to believe all the scary stories about aluminum wiring in 15/20A branch circuits. This extrapolates into ...


5

Personally, I'd switch to EMT once inside and away from the need for limited cover depth for burial. Maintains the conduit-as-grounding-path. No need for a junction on the wires - just a transition in conduit types at a pull point or box. Resists rodent teeth. Easily bent. Borrow, rent or buy a bender. Read up a bit on using a bender. Fulfills the "...


4

Once inside convert to NM wire type in a junction box then no conduit will be needed. If you are using thhn dual rated you can use non metallic flexible conduit and stay with the same wire if you already have the wire. Non metallic is usually called smurf tubing because it is usually blue but comes in many colors if your walls will be closed it will be fine, ...


5

Although this has an accepted answer there is a lot of guessing going on here. NEC 300.18 requires raceways “shall be installed complete between outlet, junction, or splicing points prior to installation of the conductors”. The hand book then identifies the reason: the handbook is an expanded version of the code (and the book that most inspectors use with ...


2

If your goal is to minimize trenching, Rigid conduit is the best choice... it only needs 6" of cover, you can trench it with a garden trowel. Note this is 12" under a vehicle pathway (driveway etc.) Use largest size you're willing to pay for but 1/2" is enough for small stuff. Note that Rigid conduit and the metal boxes it is bolted to ...


3

I'd use conduit with THHNs in it and save the UF for wiring the office-shed One thing most people don't realize about UF is that it can be used as a substitute for NM with the same makeup; the NEC permits this in NEC 340.10 point 4, and while it's usually uneconomical, it's a good way to use up spare lengths of UF. This is because while it's legal to use UF ...


2

You might as well go all the way with your subpanel upgrade There is absolutely no reason to put a dinky 10-space panel in your shed when you could get a 24-space or 30-space, 100 or 125A, main breaker panel for a minimal additional cost (the price differential we're looking at here pays for oh, a pizza or a few fancy cups of coffee, depending on where you ...


2

You just need an EMT connector and locknut (and to make sure that there's no paint in the way) You don't need the extra work of a grounding bushing for voltages under 250V, even when concentric or eccentric KOs are present, provided you're not dealing with service entrance wiring. This is implied by the lack of a specific bonding requirement for such ...


2

The standard metal coupling suffice, if you install them properly. This one is a compression style coupling, but the setscrew style will suffice as well. You make the ground contact by running that conduit nut down and bapping it tight with a screwdriver blade and hammer... and tightening the compression fitting or setscrew. After 50 years in a quasi-...


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