New answers tagged

2

There is "innerduct" which is basically a close cousin of ENT to be run inside another conduit. Practically speaking, just run two conduits. The conduit with the innerduct inside it has to be quite large, thus relatively expensive .vs. two smaller conduits suited to your needs.


3

Is there a reason you want to remove that disconnect? It looks like your feed it #10 and the Romex into the garage is #12. You could just remove the smaller cable and add conduit to you sub panel in the garage and pull #10 wire from there to your sub panel. Only 120V is going into the garage but you have the ability to bring in 240V by connecting the red ...


2

Pull the cable (USE-2 in conduit? - that was masochistic) back (or out, but back is adequate), cut the conduit, make it go where it should, send the bill to the contractor, pull the cable forward again. You do have to attach a pulling rope to the cable end and not cut that in the process, unless you do pull it all the way out. Edit: following the last bit of ...


4

The answer to your title question is "yes" but your example has other flaws. You do not derate off the 90C number in the table. You derate off the maximum thermal value for that wire. For instance THW and THWN are stated in the 75C column, so they derate off their 75C number, not 90C. TW and UF are in the 60C column, so they derate off 60C. You ...


7

You do not need to derate the wire in conduit #2 based on wire fill, but the ampacity of #14 for receptacle circuits is still limited by 240.4(D) to 15A. The description of wires in conduit #1 is a little confusing, but from a 240/120v single phase service 4 hots and 2 neutrals properly configured as two multiwire branch circuits would count as 4 current ...


Top 50 recent answers are included