New answers tagged

1

I actually managed to figure it out on my own. Referring to my picture, I moved the red wire to its own switch and added another white wire and attached it as well. Problem solved. Only downside was trying to pigtail 4 wires into one.


0

Do what common sense would engage yourself to do. Codes are written with safety in mind, but there are not capable of covering every single situation. If it were my place, and there was the slightest chance where a extra light switch could prevent an injury, I would make certain there was another switch. Falling down multiple stairs can be hazardous to ...


0

Nowhere is it written that the lights must be switched at all. You can have a 24x7 light or a day/night light if there is natural light. Also, the lights can be on a motion sensor, but the sensors must be arranged competently to see approaching stair users, which is harder than you think.


2

This is the surest sign of your 13W limit: the GU24 plate here looks plastic I bought a track light fixture for my previous house that had four GU24 halogen bulbs (50W). Those things got HOT. The socket, however, was ceramic inside a metal housing. It could survive the heat. Plastic here will not handle that.


3

I get where early LEDs didn't make much of an impression, with their blueness and rather terrible CRI. That didn't just bother you, it also bothered people in the LED business. As a direct result, they fixed it. Very thoroughly. Of course it's still possible to buy cheap, janky LEDs; in fact it's pretty easy. All the usual cheap outlets await. ...


5

If I buy a GU24 to E26 adapter and install a 30- or 60-watt incandescent in it: Is there a risk of fire because the fixture can't handle the heat produced by a 14+ watt light bulb? Is there still a risk if I remove the glass fixture and just screw the light bulb into the adapter? Would a 14+ watt light bulb potentially cause overheating in the ...


2

Without getting into how these fixtures are rated (you will find out soon) my answer to your three questions is "yes". Sockets will always have a higher rating than the fixtures that use them and it's the fixture rating that counts. Think of it like this: your car can go 100 miles per hour but you're on a winding road with cliffs on each side so the speed ...


1

I do not know the codes but I would guess that if you are in the basement during the day and you stay there until night time, then they want you to be able to turn on the lights for the stairs as a safety concern.


4

Stairway Lighting is Required, with light switches at top and bottom of the stairway if the stairs encompass more than three stair treads (Canada) or six stair treads (U.S.).


1

You can wire them the same way you'd wire the white wires together and the black wires together. If there's a green or bare wire coming out of the ceiling connect it to the group of ground wires too. Use standard wire nuts or something similar to the below illustration if in the U.K.


0

86 volts sounds like you might have an open neutral, and you're reading backfeed through a load somewhere. Time to call an electrician - usually this sort of thing happens because a white wire on 2 conductor cable had been used for a switch leg, but somebody went into a box and went color to color putting wires back together, which opens the normal return ...


1

I know with "some" track lighting it matters which way you twist them in. Which ever way you tried, try it again from the opposite direction. There are slots up in the tracks that must line up with the light


1

If there is power to the sockets and the bulbs are good, then it is a "bulb-to-socket" problem. Are you sure the bulbs are inserted such that they are making proper contact? Sometimes fixture housings prevent some bulbs from inserting all the way. In fact, I have some fixtures that require special 'long neck" bulbs...


1

I installed my system and looped it as I did to many other systems I installed. The advantage is no voltage drop but also give you the option to add additional lights just about everywhere in the areas long as you don't use the same path for the cable.


1

Don't loop if you don't have to The only advantage of the looping method is that it reduces voltage drop - this is not a problem for you. You have 95W of lights and with 12 gauge wire you can go 150 feet - your longest run is 59 feet. Run one pair left and another right and go from light to light until you get to the end.


0

I am going to say that looping would mean wiring everything the "straight way" THEN where the lights are attached at the furthest point away you would connect to them with a new conductors and run that set back to the either the relay or the transformer where your low voltage circuit originates. Obviously, if your transformer is controlled by some other ...


3

You need to just install a new loop. But, fortunately, the fix is pretty cheap and simple. I don't think glue is going to do it. You'll want to shop around for one that matches the color, size, and so forth, but here's a ring on Home Depot's website as an example, and another one from Menard's website. You might want to take the chandelier apart first and ...


0

You're not gonna like the answer. Glue won't work. You need to replace that hoop. Take the chandelier down from the ceiling unthread the wires from the chain all the way to the hoop. The hoop unscrews from the chandelier. You'll have to go to a lighting/lamp store to get a new hoop, I doubt your home store will have it. Then just reverse everything you did ...


0

With LEDs, 12V dimming works differently from mains dimming. The pictures of these LEDs show they are set up just like 12 volt LED strips - 3 LEDs in series with a resistor, repeated as needed. They also havea bridge rectifier, the angled devices in the photos, to assure they work in either polarity or on AC. AC Mains dimmers for incandescents ...


6

These new smart switches are active devices, and power themselves between supply (their black) and neutral (their white obviously). Therefore they care about the difference between supply (their black) and switched/lamp power (their red). Your old switches didn't care about that. You need the smart-switch black (supply) to go to the bundle of black ...


2

You need to reverse the line and load on the left switch


0

From the video, the sockets want 12V bulbs, so a 12V LED is appropriate. What's most likely is that the dimmer is an old-style one that doesn't interact well with LEDs. The way to fix this is to get a new lamp, or get the lamp off the dimmer, depending on your setup. EDIT: To expand, the issue is that LED lamps are actually electronics, and are not a simple ...


2

I appreciated everyone's comments and wanted to follow up with what seems to be the answer. My latest bulb has not burned out, and it has been 10+ months. Apparently I'd simply had a streak of bad luck with the bulbs I'd bought. My hypothesis that my usage or lack of usage of air conditioning in various seasons affected the electricity of the oven seems ...


2

It could be either one. The point is the loop is leaking to earth, and it shouldn't do that, and you should go through it and look at all the connection points. It's unlikely to be the cable unless he used indoor rated cable. DVMs are inconclusive. Obviously a low voltage reading is a problem, but some ground faults act like VBOs - they don't ...


0

Don't know about code. But the top light seems to cast a shadow. The actual step is in partial shadow from the step above it. I would like to see another picture with the stair light on, all other lights off, and it dark outside. If it was my stair I would try to put a light in the ceiling above the 2-4th step from the bottom. This is unpleasant ladder ...


0

Check with your Condo Association Board. They probably have a committee that reviews modifications to the individual units. I wanted to install flood lights in the back, the board approved it but the neighbors in back of me had to sign an "ok" form.


2

IANACO (I am not a condo owner) This seems like something that won't be in the rules because no one thought it important. Probably no rule about using your deck for landing starship shuttles either. Same idea. That said. Simple courtesy requires that you not disturb the other owners. So... A: Wire it up with a 3 way switch with a switch on each ...


1

The only thing that worries me is odd placements of the lights and switches requires more wires than a typical /3 cable includes, and that invites bad wiring, e.g. using two 12/2 cables where you need a 12/4 cable. Also, in this day and age, remember the light switches need real neutral at the switch. 2-wire switch loops (3-wire if 3-way) are outlawed in ...


1

Another suggestion is to replace your exiting fixture outside of the shower with a track lighting system or some other form of aimable spotlights wherein you can aim some of the light beams directly into the shower over the top of the curtain.


2

You can get light and privacy both See, when you speak of transparency, you're actually talking about 2 wildly separate things. Light can come through it --versus- An observable image can come through it If you've ever used your car's defogger, you know how you can have one and not the other. There was plenty of light, but you couldn't see. This answer ...


2

Turn off the power at the wall switch. If there are others in house while you are doing this, tape the switch in the off position or attach a note to it, and inform all others in the house that they are not to flip this switch while you are working on it. Safer yet is to turn off the breaker to this circuit in the consumer unit. The black coloured ...


1

IP66 is hose-proof, so find a recessed IP66 or IP67 luminaire if the ceiling or wall can be cut open or a surface mount one if not. If you're still scared go with low voltage LED lighting, mount the transformer in the ceiling above the existing light. and remember it is (or should be) all on an ELCB, so the worst than can happen is being plunged into ...


2

I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier: There exist shower curtains where the top bit is transparent, but the rest of it isn't, explicitly to get more light into the shower while still providing privacy. A search for "shower curtain translucent window" should find some.


0

Can the curtain rod be removed and repositioned lower? If so, you can cut off the bottom few inches of the curtain, (or buy a new, shorter curtain; I think the curtain you have now is longer than standard.) That shouldn't reduce privacy. You can also move the towel off the rod by installing a towel rack near the shower, so it's still accessible from inside ...


3

How about a glass shower door, a combination of clear and frosted glass? They can be ordered to size and are not expensive. If glass doors are not an option, you can install one or more battery operated led lights in the shower (see enclosed picture).


0

Your lights may be fine but the end needs to be taped for several reasons. First if 120v or higher an exposed wire could lead to a electrical shock or worse. Second the exposed ends could short together tripping the breaker and causing further damage to the conductors and or insulation. Third if the hot conductor contacts another electrical device that may ...


2

I would scrape off the paint in that circle to see what is there - you might find screws etc If not then I have used a bradawl in the past to find the joist - usually light fittings are close to joists for support or an extra piece of wood is fitted between two joists to provide support.


1

Edison screw (ES) is correct, in Australia this will be almost certainly an E14 size. This is the commonest small size. You might have one in your fridge to test. Make sure the rest of the bulb can fit! I live in Aust.


2

The ballast etc is inside the Eterna LEP13 lampholder and you can just change the lampholder or the pendant and leave the ceiling rose as it is. This is a misguided attempt under Building Regs that require a certain proportion of lighting points in new build houses to be 'low energy'. Similar product from MK https://www.ebay.co.uk/c/1412633868


2

G24q-1 bulbs do not take mains voltage I agree that the 8-terminal block is the standard UK mains splice. However, there must be a ballast or driver circuit between the mains connection and the G24q socket. You must account for that before you can rewire. My concern is that they may simply be using common UK wiring kit to extend from an external ...


1

You're really talking about a "Watts vs VA" issue. Go back and look at Tester101's "triac dimmer" illustration. Watts is the power you actually use (excluding the black area under the sine wave). VA is the entire sinewave that the generator must generate to create the part you use. "Power factor" is the difference between the watts you are actually ...


4

The 2 black + 1 white is your always-hot bundle. You won't use it (unless you want to power the fan 24x7 and use a remote on it). The 2 white is the neutral bundle. Your fan will need that. The loose black is the switched-hot from the switch. (it is the partner wire to the oddball white from above). This is the switched-hot for the fan. The switch ...


1

IKEA provides a tool to help identify bulb size. The one you need is listed as a group: (E12, E14, E17 or SES) The 12 in E12, for example, means a diameter of 12mm. This is just a bit under 1/2". Carefully measure the size of the threaded cylinder and you should know which size you need. E14 will be about 9/16". E17 will be about 11/16". E14 and SES are the ...


2

Most of those old motion detector stalk light deals are modular. You can open them up and change just the motion sensor, for instance. That's exactly what you can do. Change the motion sensor to one that does require a neutral wire. That means the sensor will be powering itself with its own local power supply, and won't be leaking current through the ...


0

Looking at your diagram, you are using the white wire as hot to the left-hand switch and black and red as travelers between the two 3-way switches. On the left-hand switch, you will find (excluding the green ground screw) one terminal looks different, probably a different color) than the other two. This is where the white wire goes. The black and red wires ...


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