New answers tagged

4

Even if you could, I wouldn't trust that the plastics, solder and semiconductors of an LED lamp wouldn't leach unfriendly chemicals out into the oven's air, and then the food. There's a reason they tell hobbyists to not use your food oven for "re-flowing" (building or fixing) electronic circuit boards.


24

As already stated, LEDs can't take the heat. In addition: Many ovens use halogen bulbs instead of "ordinary" incandescent bulbs. These are a type of incandescent light with two key differences: size and heat. The size is irrelevant for most ordinary lamps but great for an oven, where you want something small so that it won't take away from ...


9

Not gonna happen. Can't take the heat. Those consumer products one calls an "LED light bulb" is a built consumer product made of components - case, heat sink, electronics and an array of LED emitters. The latter are purchasable as components by electronics supply houses such as mouser.com, with over 100,000 types listed. Every one has a data ...


10

I think it's unlikely that this is possible. The environment in the oven in quite mild compared with an incandescent lamp, but LEDs, being semiconductor devices generally don't function well above about 100C. Some vendors seem to be making newer ovens with insulated or otherwise thermally isolated lamp compartments so that they can install LED lighting but ...


1

Two ways to connect 3-way switches and load. Firt feed and load in same junction box. Second feed and load connected in different boxes. In second only three wires run between boxes: two travelers and one phase return. So two wires live voltage.


0

If you're going to use relays, you need at least 2 relays on the output from the Upstairs sensor to isolate that sensor's activation of both LED strips from each other, and the individual activation of the other sensors. If your sensors don't output 12v with enough current to drive the LED strips, you'd need 2 additional relays for the Lobby and Stair_Lower ...


2

You may be able to replace the mount plate and tubular arm with a custom assembly of black iron pipe and fittings that acts as a stand. From bottom up... A 3/4" or 1" floor flange (whatever is large enough to cover the junction box) A vertical pipe of ~18" A 90° elbow to horizontal A pipe nipple of ~8" A 90° elbow to vertical (downward) ...


0

Use some bricks (or rocks, if I see the wall below correctly) and mortar to make a small tower on top of the wall, which will have walls you can mount your light(s) to.


1

This does not necessarily meet your request for "cheaper", but I have 2 suggestions that otherwise will likely solve your problem: Consider underwater pond lights. I use them above water along a creek bank that is prone to occasional flooding. After about a year or so, there have been no leak or condensation problems. This is in Texas, but they ...


0

"The lights are supposed to be IP66 waterproof" That's not very helpful if, in reality, they clearly aren't. Unfortunately, you bought junk :( There may be some point to messing with the products you got and fixing them (because as-is they are broken by design), but it's your call as to whether it's worth the trouble or not. Personally, I'd return ...


1

I am not sure if allowed in Canada but in the US we are allowed and even required to provide a drain in things like this a small drilled hole that will allow the water to drain out should eliminate the pooling. I used to have multiple drains on my big 1000w metal halide lights because they cool in the winter they suck the water in just like yours. A small 1/...


2

Here is a different answer, having now seen the ceiling box. (Thanks to @threephaseEel for requesting that) You have a shallow box with a chandelier hub in it that will obstruct a typical crossbar and nipple. You also have knob and tube wiring so I'm hesitant to suggest changing or modifying the box at all. To work with this box you need to buy an ...


2

Unlike some lamps this doesn't hang from a metal tube with the cord running through it. It hangs from the cord. Shove it through the nipple and tie a knot above it. There are S-shaped plastic dongles you can attach to the cable above the nipple, but those cost about 10 cents more than a knot and do the same thing. Hopefully your ceiling box already has a ...


0

Do you have a volt meter or a way to detect which of the lines have power? In my area one of the blacks would be hot but having 3 wires is unusual. a switched hot goes to the brown wire or L terminal. The neutral goes to the blue or n terminal. I would check with a meter to see where there is voltage. black to black? then voltage black to yellow? Last the ...


0

Are these driveway lights controlled by a day/night control of some kind? If so, an incandescent control needs only 2 wires to operate but CFL's or LED's need a different 3 wire control. Try screwing in another incandescent bulb to see if that fixture still works. If it does, and you have a day night control you will need to get the correct control. If you ...


2

Go with the larger dimmer. It will allow you to add higher wattage bulbs down the road. Your 9 watt LED bulb is equivalent to a 60 watt standard bulb. That's a middle of the road wattage so allow for larger bulbs.


0

As you probably know the 3-way on diagram A is the second switch and connects to the 3 way on diagram B which in turn goes to the light. I'm almost certain the to lights you wish to control separately are setup in series which means you cannot control them separately from the wired switches without disconnecting the second light and adding a new wire to one ...


0

That "eBay special" is not made for the UK market. Amazon has a program called "Amazon Marketplace" where anybody can sell anything on the Amazon platform, and the listings lurk among real Amazon listings. This means Amazon is full of eBay-tier junk, and it is flooded with cheap Chinese merchandise which ignores every safety regulation, ...


0

The three browns need to stay connected together to provide power to the switch for this and to other installed lamps. You could use a 3-way Wago block or other approved connector. you'll need the same for the blues unless your new lamp provides a connector for them too.


1

Connect your pendant to the leftmost and rightmost terminal in this picture. Your pendant should have brown and blue wires that correspond. If it has a yellow, green, or bare wire connect that to the corresponding large terminal at the top of the picture. One brown/blue pair in the center set of terminals is power coming in, and another brown/blue pair is ...


0

Sounds like the ground wire would have attached to the ceiling mount which in turn would have grounded the chain and any metal attached to that. The value in the earth is if, some how, the live comes lose and touches the metal rather than potentially electrocuting you it will be connected by all that metal to earth and trip the breaker. You want the earth ...


1

12V constant-current power supplies have a small "standby" power usage of a watt or three depending on quality, when all the DC loads are switched off. You can measure this by plugging it into a Kill-a-Watt. Other than that, they draw whatever power is used on the DC side, plus a few percent for conversion losses. 12V LED strips typically use a ...


0

I had a similar situation and decided on track lighting. With track lighting you mount the tracks and can then attach multiple independent spotlights. In addition to positioning the spotlight you can easily move their position on the track. This has saved me many times when we re-arranged the room. We did one track down either side of the room which allows ...


2

Number of fixtures is easily reduced by using long fixtures: 4 or even 8 foot fluorescent tubes, for instance. 45 foot long LED strip lights appear to be available, on a casual search. Strings of small lights on cords (fairy lights, Christmas lights) hung from hooks. Whether that's the lighting you want is a whole different question and mostly off-topic as ...


2

Normally, in the fixture, the hot and neutral should both be isolated from the chassis of the fixture. So it shouldn't matter whether the fixture is earthed or not. We earth things to allow for the possibility that hot or neutral is leaking onto the chassis. The idea is the chassis can't shock people; and if the leakage is severe, this will cause hundreds ...


6

Fixtures are grounded to protect one from getting shocked if there is a short or fault in the fixture. The ground wasn't connected properly, according to you, so you got shocked because of some problem. Now that the ground is properly connected, you shouldn't get shocked but the problem still exists and must be fixed. Examine the fixture for frayed wires, ...


1

The big thing is figuring out which wire is switched hot and which wire is neutral. Note that it is possible, due to messed up wiring, to have some other combination, such as hot and a switched neutral, which would not be a good thing. Use a non-contact tester to: Verify that both wires are "dead" with the circuit breaker (or fuse) off. If not, ...


0

Yes, it's possible to rearrange things to fit what you want The trick to this is that while Lutron's diagram shows line and load on opposite ends of the circuit, nothing stops you from wrapping that load wire back around to the first box then connecting to the existing load wire there. So, given that you have /3 going down the spur and starting with the ...


3

When they say fixtures are "bulbless", they really mean it. There are no replaceable bulbs in the fixture. The reason is simple: LED emitters are the most reliable thing in the lamp... probably more reliable than the enclosure. The typical failure point in a 120V LED light product is the electronic driver module, which is responsible for delivering ...


0

This is a standard "star" metal core printed circuit board, but what's mounted on it is definitely not standard or off the shelf. The white squares are LED chips, but it's not possible to tell what color of light they should emit by looking at them when they're not powered. They don't have yellow phosphor on it, so they're not blue-pumped phpsphor ...


1

I agree with FreeMan and his answer but from the sounds of it you have the wafer LED lights that just pinch the drywall? If so, you basically have 2 options. A dimmer that is rated for LED lighting and replacing the lights with Yellower or softer lighting. The dimmer is normally the best way to go here assuming the wafer lights support the dimmer function. I ...


4

Consider that any film you put across the opening of the can will hold heat in. Heat is the enemy of the electronics in the driver for your LED bulbs. Well, heat is the enemy of all electronics. It will also hasten the death of other types of lighting, and could, potentially, trap enough heat to start a fire. I would consider a dimmer, allowing you to adjust ...


0

Interesting question: Yes, you can connect all the letters in parallel. But be careful here. You're talking about both AC (mains powers) and DC (batteries). Measuring DC current is more difficult than AC. with AC you can just put a DM with an amp clamp around a wire and whamo samo, you have a current reading. Measuring DC current is less common, possible,...


0

you can connect the letters in parallel to a single 3V supply. The current requirement is going to add up so I can't guess how many amps you will need. is there anything written on the lamps? (if they unscrew on the metal part) You could use a multimeter to measure how much each letter needs (I expect that I uses less than W) and add those up.


1

This is OK, as the greens on the pendant lights are connected via 1 bare copper to the fixture. Normally, this would require both of the coppers to come from the same connection point if the shades are metal. if the shades are non metallic, it would not need the lower ground, but the metal canopy that they hang from needs to be grounded. Since the mfg. has ...


1

Strengthen the supplied sticky backing with something better at all stress points (beginning, end, change of direction, near any switches or other places the strip will be handled). Options: double sided foam tape A bracket made of a strip of wood with wood glue and/or screws A metal bracket ... just a thin strip of metal that runs across the light strip ...


29

There are two completely different thermal objectives First, don't set other stuff on fire. That's decided by the thermal insulation of the fixture (think: thick insulation in down lights) and limits the size (in actual wattage) of any bulb, but it's mainly aimed at incandescents. Incandescent bulbs love hot places and work better there. A fixture succeeds ...


2

The old switch Strictly speaking, you need to find out what those three wires are connected to. If I had to guess, though, I'd feel quite confident that the wires are as labeled here: The bridging wire (called a "jumper" in my world) tells the tale. The power supply is the only wire that would be connected to both switches, and thus to two ...


10

The manual is vague, but I think the trick here is what I like to call "old wattage". Back in the not-so-dark dark ages of light bulbs, everything was incandescent. Incandescent wattage was important because a light bulb with a 100 watt fillament puts out a LOT more heat than a 60 watt bulb. So if you put a higher watt bulb into many fixtures, it ...


17

I think you misunderstood the instruction manual. Where it reads "LED bulbs (9-Watt, Maximum)" is in the parts list. This is not giving the fixture rating. It is saying that the included lamps will use a maximum of 9W. As the manufacturer may source the lamps from multiple vendors, this makes sense. You will need to look at the fixture to determine ...


6

It's already puzzling out of the box: the manual reads "uses two 9.5-Watt LED bulbs which are included", and the sockets are rated "maximum 9W". Considering the horizontal position of the bulbs and that the light diffuser bowl is top-open and allows convection, it seems that 10W could be fine. How the legal line would be drawn if there is ...


5

Whether an LED bulb will be suitable for use in a fixture will generally depend upon two factors: (1) how hot the bulb would get in the fixture, and (2) how hot the bulb could get without adversely affecting lifetime. If a fixture has a 9W rating, that would suggest that a typical 9W bulb may get warm enough to reduce its lifetime somewhat, but not ...


0

If you have a plaster ceiling and it's in good shape, not coming away from the lath anywhere, there are some screw types and techniques that could reasonably hold weight like this. I don't recommend it but it's possible and you need to experiment to find what works well in your plaster. It varies. If you do this, also follow the advice below for the FIRST ...


9

The maximum power ratings are set by the design of the fixture. If it says 9W max. then you run a risk or damage or fire by exceeding that. Going from 9 to 10 W is a GREATER than 10% increase.


0

This is likely the result of line noise AND a poor dimmer circuit on the LED bulbs. Cheap dimmers will watch the AC waveform and time peak waveform voltages to divine what level it should be running at since even at way dim, the bulb actually still gets more than enough power to run full-blast. A spike/drop that cancels or delays the expected 120th/sec ...


0

I know this is rather old, but I would use a surface mount box, a couple of short bits of conduit and an elbow to get the cable inside the building. Mount the surface mount box directly on the center line, taking advantage of that stud to mount firmly to that. Run a short stub of conduit horizontaly to clear the stub. Install the elbow to turn into the ...


1

It is not clear if that flickering occurs when the lamp is switched on or off. The one-shot flickering - when the Lamp is switched off - with a period time of seconds to minutes is often simply caused by wires running parallel. If a LED lamp is switched off, still some current can flow through the capacitance between the wires which are inevitable with the ...


0

LEDs are notoriously sensitive to voltage variations...they react INSTANTLY to a short drop in voltage, like a heat pump kicking on, Electric range, pump, etc. Compare that to the old incandescent bulbs with a filament that had to cool for a bit before they would exhibit a flicker due to a very short voltage drop. This is the brave new world, we're ...


1

and then wiring the Hue smart plug into the ceiling via the exposed wires. What?, Exposed wires, NO. You would have to have an outlet with the Hue smart plug installed and then plug the modified chandelier wire into the Hue smart outlet. That will only turn it off and on, not control brightness, tone and color like with the Hue bulbs. The only option I am ...


1

After a couple of weeks of doing nothing towards this issue, I took my own suggestion with the prodding of Mysterfxit. First, I want to correct my previous statements re: troubleshooting. It seems once in a blue moon I don't (fully) know what I'm talking about. :>) It only takes one of the wall switches to reset the fan controller. The other switch isn'...


Top 50 recent answers are included