New answers tagged

1

Access to the wiring connections of any can light is based on pulling the light out of the hole, then accessing the connections though that hole. In this case, the wiring box can be pulled all the way out of the hole so you're in better shape than some situations. With a good brand name like Lithonia, this are sure to be UL listed which means they should ...


3

Well, there is "safe" and then there is "safe and legal". Running what amounts to an extension cord up the wall to a light meant to be hard wired is going to be a code violation and there are subtle safety issues. As far as "will this work and not kill me", then probably. The cord needs to be fastened to the wall so no one trips on it or snags it with ...


2

Yes, you want to tap off the existing switch. First, get a 5-pack of colored electrical tape ($4 at the big-box). Go into the existing switch box, make sure the black wires are switched and not the white (if not fix it). Find the cable to the existing switch; the black wire will be switched-hot. Mark it with red electrical tape. Now, everything in the ...


1

It looks like he got the switched load from lamp A tied into both lamps. The hot from switch A going to switch B and load switch B going to lamp B. Now when switch B is closed, both lamps will be on, wired in series, and switch A does nothing. If switch B is off, then A is normal.


0

LED flickers, because it is a light emitting diode (a solid state lamp). The Lamp will only light when its power cycle is "on". A dimmer in essence, SLOWS DOWN THE CYCLE TIME, therefore slowing down the time frame in which a cycle is repeated. So, the lamp appears to flicker, because it is turning ON and OFF!


1

I'll tell you a secret: they flicker all the time You just don't notice it, because the higher the power, the longer they stay ON and quicker switch on/off. As you dim down them, their flickering becomes more even and noticeable. What about randomness ? Well, it flickers randomly to minimize harmonics disturbance. Wait, what's that ? It's topic for another ...


0

Electronic devices like LED compatible dimmers that chop up the AC power into tiny chunks tend to generate electronic noise that consists of harmonics of the line frequency but at very high frequencies. These signals will bounce around between other devices nearby through the wiring. This can cause interactions between those devices which would be more ...


1

Check that your LED bulbs are compatible with dimmers, and check that your dimmers are compatible with LEDs. If their respective packages don't say, then they probably aren't compatible and you will have problems. Even if everything claims to be compatible, you still might have issues. In that case, the best you can do is experiment with different brands ...


17

LEDs on AC Power Don't Like to be Dimmed. Period. (LEDs on DC can actually be dimmed quite easily - just look at an older battery powered LED device (like handheld computer games from the 1980s) and you can see the LEDs dim when the battery is low.) But most AC powered LED lights - whether complete fixtures or Edison bulb incandescent replacements - have a ...


13

The specifications of the LED lights you have say they will dim down to 10% without any flicker or buzzing. Some lights don't go down that far, and some will go even further. Based on the manual for your dimmer switch, there is an adjustment to change the low end of the dimming range: I would assume the switch would be factory set to work with most lights,...


3

The better way to do this is buy a higher quality garage door opener that has the features you want. But OK, well, if you really, really want this... we'll need to hack the appliance. That's not disallowed by NEC, but it voids the appliance's UL listing, which means it's no longer approved equipment. So it shouldn't be hardwired, it should be cord-and-...


3

Not a good idea. You're talking about backfeeding 120V into a circuit board that has just turn off 120V. You could definitely screw up your opener. I'm surprised you don't have a regular light and switch in your garage independent of your opener. Do you have any switches by the garage door that don't do anything? They might be for a light that's just ...


7

Lights on garage door openers are normally controlled by a proprietary wall console like this: Genie Wall Console (I have no idea if this is the one you really need, just an example) They use the same two wires as the pushbutton does, but send special signals for other features such as the light and lock functions. The wall console wires might even need ...


3

20 AWG is rated for 5 amps, so it's good for taking any strip as far as you ought to. I prefer 22 AWG or 0.25 mm2, and stranded wire. The reason is, if the wires are any thicker, they will tend to "wag the dog", pulling the LED strip out of shape/position and potentially tearing off the solder pad. The "0.75" on the output terminals is surely not a ...


3

Either remove the wires entirely, or if it is impossible to do so, remove as much of the cables at most ends obliterate the cables at both ends so they are entirely orphaned in the wall. Don't get your cables mixed up! Then, remove the old junction box entirely. Gone.


1

Regarding running costs, at a price of 11.5 cents a kilowatt hour a 1 Watt bulb left on all year would cost $1.00. So assuming you only have the light on when its dark, say an average 8 hours a day throughout the year then removing the 3 LED bulbs would save you about $5.


4

Yes, that will cut energy use in half, though the type of bulb (LED, CFL, incandescent, one that's not invented yet) does not matter. Of course, you also get half the light. A bulb which is removed does not use any electricity whether or not the fixture is switched on (James Thurber's Grandmother notwithstanding, for the literarily inclined.)


6

No! The wire is (almost certainly) only rated for 20A. If the breaker is tripping because more than 20A is flowing, then uprating the breaker will mean more than 20A flows through the wires, your wires heat up, and your house burns down. (If the breaker is tripping because it's a GFCI breaker and there is a ground fault, then a 30A GFCI breaker will also ...


0

Diode in reverse parallel with Led (or Led with limiting resistor). Should give you a halfwave rectified 60hz sine & the Led will still light up, but some people might notice said flicker. You might compensate the flicker by evening out sinewave with simple RC. Might be all simpler than a bridge rectifier circuit.


1

As you seem to know, the "bare" wires, along with any green or yellow/green wires, are always and only Equipment Safety Ground. They get used for nothing else. How the 3 wires must be allocated NEC 110.3(B) requires you install the light switches according to the instructions. This is not optional. Since Reading the Fine Manual is mandatory, you see the "...


4

You're going to need a deep socket or maybe a needle nosed pliers.


5

The middle image clearly shows a nut at the bottom of the recess or hole. Get some deep thin wall sockets and it should come undone easily. Or undo the flathead screws and make the wires safe then break the base. Then remove or grind down the threads...


0

Buzzing is usually because something is physically loose inside, and is being vibrated by the electro-magnetic force from the internal wires. This gets worse with dimming, because triac dimmers make a very bizarre waveform that makes insane amounts of harmonic distortion, and it may resonate better at 180 or 300Hz or 420Hz than 60Hz. You could crack it open ...


2

It appears Allen & Roth is a "house brand" of Lowes, meaning Lowes buyers visit Shenzhen and go around to Chinese makers and wheel and deal to get things like this made as a limited run. However in their defense, they make the manufacturer build to US safety standards and secure a UL listing ETL listing for the item. Because US retailers are required to ...


2

I've had the same problem and I don't like buying a new sensor for want of a $0.01 piece of plastic. Yes, I've found that a piece cut from a milk jug seems to work perfectly for me.


2

Can't do it Here's the problem. Your original installation only has the two wires, even though it controls both light and fan. This means the original switch was not a plain switch. It was a complex beast, which multiplexed both fan and light control onto those two wires. It can be fairly guessed that it's having a conversation either with a smart fan,...


1

Wow, this is a tangle. Here's what's really going on here. There are 2 lights! Your photo doesn't document which (non-visible) terminal on the 3-way is common. But we can figure it out for 2 reasons: a) we can see one traveler, and both travelers are always in the same cable. And b) the upper right has 2 wires, and there would be no earthly reason for ...


0

from your description it sounds ok. the two blacks on the common could go to two lamps on the stairs...


1

You have an open neutral somewhere in the line From the meter readings you took with the breaker off, namely no continuity between any pair of wires, even neutral to ground which should have a low resistance between them since they are connected at the main panel, as well as the neutral "ringing" as hot with a non-contact voltage detector, it sounds like ...


0

Residential occupancy sensors are rated for indoor use, down to 32F (0C). there are commercial / industrial versions for for things like walk-in freezers good to -20F or even lower, but will not be made for mounting in wall boxes because there would not be wall boxes in there since there would be moisture issues as well. But that is one avenue to pursue if ...


1

I invite other answers, but since you mention cove lighting specifically, there are slim transformers that are made to be easy to hide like this model: Armacost 12v LED Driver transformer To use this, you could have a 120v standard electrical box behind the molding where the NM cable would exit the wall and attach to the transformer. I'm not sure exactly ...


1

Since your yellow wire was not stripped it is probably your switched hot and this being an extra light fixture I would pull the light black wire off the connection to the other blacks and connect the lights black wire to the un-used yellow, this will probably give you control of the new light and probably an existing one that’s how I would have done a spec ...


4

Look for a switch with a yellow wire that doesn't seem to control anything. That will become the switch for the light fixture. Connect your light fixture green to green, white to white, and fixture black to ceiling yellow.


1

You're saying "last one", but that has two meanings. First as position: the last one in the row. Second as time: the last one remaining. The second meaning is relevant here. What's actually the case is all 4 sockets are wired the same. What's causing the problem is removing the last (final) incandescent. It wouldn't matter if you removed it from ...


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