New answers tagged

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Frame it out and build a small bulkhead then add a access door where it would please you. This way even if someone were to screw into the drywall they would be nowhere near the electrical stuff. You can Frame it out of light gage steel or just stick with 2x4. This way you also avoid the need to repair the ceiling.


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Because your panel is a GE Qline The original breakers was their 1" wide 2-pole breaker. The type straddles two spaces, leaving 1/2" above and below. You took it to the store, I am guessing a big box, and looked for breakers like that. They didn't have GE 1" 2-poles. But you or they mistook it for a duplex. GE does not make duplex breakers. But you ...


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I think your idea of a wood panel isn't bad, but I would go the extra mile here: Buy a nicer board, a couple of basic hinges, and a knob Paint the mounted opening white and fix your drywall Cut your board to be large enough to cover the opening and paint it white Attach the knob and hinges, then mount to the opening on the side closest to the wall It looks ...


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I don't suppose you want to remove the first layer of 1x2's, fix the ceiling as you would normally to and then add a register (yes, another one) vent to cover up the wall portion? Just like the one I showed you yesterday...lol:


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Victorian construcion typically puts a cabinet style door behind tub faucets, so they can be easily changed. But then, tub faucets came to exist in the Victorian age. They would fit a lovely little cabinet door on the vertical, with a latch. The hinge would be on the left, to permit this door to swing open and allow the ceiling hole to be accessed. ...


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The rule for steel plates is 1/16" (1.6mm) The general rule in the NEC for steel plates used to protect wiring from damage is that they need to be 1/16" (1.6mm) or thicker. In other words, you need a piece of sheet steel 15 gauge or thicker in order to provide adequate protection to these cables. This rule is set out in NEC 300.4, specifically 300.4(D) in ...


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Does the ground terminal on the inverter connect to anything else.. the inverter (and car) chassis, for example? If it does, and if the ground wire from the inverter to the main panel is not connected, then there could be a potential that develops between the body of the car and other nearby metallic structures (overhead garage door track, stair handrails, ??...


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Yes, I'm making a second answer. Why? Because today I needed to shut off a circuit in an old stab-lok control center. I flipped the breaker and fortunately I checked. It did not actually turn off. I fiddled a bit, it disconnected, I bumped the wire with my screwdriver, it came back on. I sort of shook the breaker into submission and it finally seemed to ...


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NEC 210.8 covers GFCI , in my 2014 version the replacement of 2 prong receptacles with 3 prong when GFCI protected was in 406.4.d But not the same in 2017 , I will update this when I find it for the 17 code. I looked at 406.4.d and did not see it in 17 code 250.130.c “non grounding receptacle replacement” information note states see.406.4.d ,,, oops I ...


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Subpanel 1 is old fuses. Small, but nothing inherently wrong with it (at least not without more details/examination). Subpanel 2 is Square D - Good stuff. Main panel is a Federal Pacific Stab-Lok firestarter I am not a professional electrician (barely an amateur) but I have seen enough here on DIY and on other sites to know that is a BIG problem. See, for ...


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You're going to have to start by mapping your house. It helps to have a whole bunch of night lights, or any kind of lights, or loads of some sort that light up clearly when the power is on. One for each receptacle in the house. I'm fond of making up names for them. So for instance the Square D breaker box, I might call those Quill, Rocket, Gamora, ...


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The floating neutral is good news, but you don't need a ground rod for this The fact that your generator has a floating neutral is actually quite fortunate for you, as breaker-interlock-based transfer setups are largely incompatible with generators that have bonded neutrals (the more common case). However, since you're plugging your generator into your ...


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That looks like where a main breaker goes, and the stuff in there looks like the damaged guts of a main breaker. I supremely doubt this is for the outside lights. This an extreme hazard being just like it is. I strongly recommend you get an electrician out to fix it before it burns someone's hand. What's more, it appears that something that is supposed ...


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If you're in North America or Japan, I am very concerned about this 240V reading between a phase and the hot tub water. It's possible that your grounding is messed up, and your house is accidentally grounding to a phase. Generally, that happens with a combination of two things: A lost grounding electrode, so the system voltage ends up "floating" ...


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If I test for voltage between a phase and the hot tub water, I get 240V. I'm a bit concerned about that. The big question is how much current is flowing during the test. If it is > 10mA then it should trip your GFCI, as you are leaking current through the hot tub water, which is exactly the hazard that a GFCI is supposed to prevent. Is there anything else ...


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I tried taking a multimeter to test for continuity between the house's ground and the hot tub water, but it didn't show anything. You should not see anything if the ground were properly connected. Most of the time, the hot tub is fiberglass and the piping is plastic, so there should be no connection to ground, EXCEPT via the pump housing, assuming a ...


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You need to talk to your AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction, i.e. The guy who issues the permits). This is provided for in the Electrical Code by giving AHJs latitude to set grounding standards to suit local conditions. You are like the 10,000th person in their jurisdiction to have that problem. They have compared notes with other AHJs nationally with ...


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Your utility would violating Code up here in the USA While the US National Electrical Code does not apply to utility wiring or operations for the most part (these fall under the US National Electrical Safety Code, or NESC, instead), the NEC does contain requirements for electrical service sizing, and your utility does not follow them for their split-phase (...


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Why 30A service? Because of provisioning. They are not able to provision 50A service at this time at this location. That is probably due to transformer or pole-line wire capacity in the neighborhood. Giving everyone 50/60A service means they would be oversubscribing their transformers and pole lines. This would necessitate a big capital expense ...


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Haven't heard back from you, so here goes. About the panel/breakers This thing you have is a meter-main with 12 breaker spaces. The main is "backfed" meaning the main breaker is just one of the breakers. The Challenger breakers are known to be defective. And because of that, many electricians treat Challenger panels as if they're defective. They're ...


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The only issue I see is service wires in the same conduit with feeder/branch circuit wires. And of course, this is no time to scrimp on spaces, e.g. A 30-space would be a good answer.


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Your plan is still code compliant in the 17 version. I like copper but you may find aluminum easier to find and it is a little easier to bend even though it is a larger size. Make sure to use an anti oxide compound especially with aluminum, but I even use it with copper. Also make sure to properly torque the connections. I teach my apprentice’s to torque ...


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I have replaced a couple of these. The back plane is narrower than today’s panels (code required space). The one good thing I have found in all but 1 case was that there were boards on the inside the of the studs to make the panel fit 16 on center. This means I was able to rip the spacer boards out and a new panel fit in between the studs. Just a note to ...


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There may be a perfectly reasonable reason for the Pushmatic panel tripping with 2 major appliances going at once; however, that would also be a reason to replace the panel. Pushmatic is a fine panel It does not have the problems of some old panels of being unsafe. However, it does have a reputation for the action of resetting the breaker being very ...


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Yes, the gaps are a “Fire Code” issue, ( in the U.S., anyway...I don’t know about Canada, but I suspect it’s similar.) You indicate your building is 3 stories plus a basement. In the U.S., this requires “Fire Resistant” construction, unless there are automatic fire sprinklers throughout the building. What this means is that gypsum board must be on each ...


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If you are planning to use a generator just for an emergency situation at your house. You are better of purchasing a residential type of genset. If you are trying to save money and only want use the generator for something other than a residential emergency supply. Then you should go with just the standard portable generator. However, your input into your ...


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I use cad weld when I need bonds that will stand up to anything or I do not want to have an access hatch for the bond to be inspected. Looking at the mess at your weather head you may not be able to find an electrician that can do it. The graphite trays that contain the metal are two expensive for the homeowner, but you may check around. Cad welding is an ...


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The problem isn't getting a cover, that whole panel is falling apart and the conduit and meter cans above it look really bad too, not to mention the gutter above them. Not sure where this is at but if it was in Florida, they'd be disconnected on the spot. You really need to think about getting this fixed.


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Sheet Metal That's really the only choice. That was almost certainly what was there before. Conductive is actually NOT a problem. If it is designed and implemented correctly, the metal will not be in contact with ANY wires under normal conditions. There is, obviously, a concern if somehow the metal is in contact with one of the hot wires and then someone ...


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