New answers tagged

1

Some great suggestions and I did get a shorter 5' piece of the 2 1/2" IMC threaded and did exactly what Freeman and Ecnerwal suggested. But to answer my original question: Answer: The final top section of IMC conduit needs to be securely tied to the structure by at least one strap/tie. This means the coupler will need to be (at least) ~6" below ...


1

You have to run 4-wire to a generator. A separate neutral and ground wire is mandatory. A ground rod will not substitute. The only way to avoid running a 4th wire is to use non-flex metal conduit the whole way. (or run 120V only, but that's no fun). But that's OK, I'm about to save you enough money to pay for the ground wire or the conduit. Minimum ...


1

I just so happened to have my electrician come out the day after I posed this question. For those wondering, I was fully comfortable with @NoSparksPlease answer, and was expecting them to go with a 40A breaker and #8AWG wire. However, after looking at the motor specs the electrician suggested 30A and #10AWG wire. He said they had wired several this way and ...


2

No problem, that is how you would do it. The only thing you cannot do is to make a splice in a wall and cover it without access to it. #8 wire sliced onto #10 though might be a problem, not at the splice end, but is your receptacle rated to terminate #8 wire? Why are you increasing the wire size?


2

You are in the wrong section, 440 is refer equipment, you need too roll back to section 430, Motors, Motor circuits, and Controllers. Part III Motor and Branch circuit protection Then look at label: Continuous duty motor, Section 430.32. More than 1 HP, Paragraph (A). Thermally Protected, (2) A thermal protector integral with the motor, check, now we're ...


3

Yes, you can do that and as you have noted, there are many used KWH meters for sale on EBAY and other places. A properly installed meter base along with a listed meter will do what you want and be compliant. It's not uncommon for such meters to be used with solar energy systems and such. I recommend the old-fashioned mechanical kind vs. the new digital ...


12

Yes, the national electric code allows wiring in structures like your shed. If you plan on using UF wire for the run buried 24” deep you need to bring the wire up in conduit so the wire is protected. If you run conduit, the conduit only has to be buried 18” for PVC. If you run rigid or intermediate metal it can be buried 6”. Burial depths are listed in the ...


11

It is advisable to use a slip joint [expansion coupling] on the conduit stub up, otherwise nothing out of the ordinary. Around here, that's not out of the ordinary even with a poured foundation. Assuming PVC conduit, 18" cover to the top of the conduit, minimum. Warning tape above. Stub-ups (what sticks out of the ground) need to be schedule 80, and it'...


1

Problem #1: Main Service Panel A is overloaded(!!!!!) Unless, for some reason, you want to try to run a tankless hot water heater, brute that it is, from your generator when the power's out, or faff with load shed boxes for that matter, your tankless water heaters alone are sufficient to overload Main Service Panel A based on the information you've given, as ...


0

Hey Scott: I hate to say it, but you have a mess on your hands. As others have pointed out, you have multi wire branch circuits (MWBC) that are not wired correctly. brhans correctly noticed (I missed it) that the MWBCs on the double stuff (tandem) breakers can overload the neutral and not trip....up to 40 amps on a wire with 20 amp capacity (12 ga). In ...


2

Aside from the general "overfull panel" problem as already noted by others in comments, there is a much bigger concern. Adding 30A @ 240V for solar power is not the same as adding an electric dryer or other 30A @ 240V appliance. In one sense it is much easier - this is something supplying power rather than consuming power. But in fact there can be ...


5

Sophie's choice: One way, you fry half the appliances in the RV... The other way, you electrify the chassis of the RV. Whoops! The only other possibility with a 6/2 cable is to hook up neutral and ground properly, then not hook up one of the hot wires, but this too is bad (just less destructively). The only way to support a 14-50 with 6/2 is to add a 12 ...


2

If the conductors are to be replaced, the utility will likely require the new work to meet their current requirements. For my utility that would mean also replacing the 2" conduit with 3" -- they simply won't install a residential service in a 2" conduit anymore. There exist compression-style fittings for rigid conduit -- you don't have to ...


1

Why not simply flip the riser upside down, so the 3' section goes directly into the meter/main, and the 10' piece goes up through the roof into the weather head. That way you can easily get two clamps between the coupler and the roof line, securely holding the 10' piece, and 1 clamp on the 3' piece between the coupling and the panel.


1

Well, if you have 2x 200A service, feeding that from a single meter would require a "class 320" meter (320A continuous, which is 400A derated 80%, so it matches, even if it does not appear that way at first.) The odds are (since those are a significant step up in expense for the meter can) that you don't have that for the meters you have now. So ...


10

The good news is that your proposed closet is big enough The good news about your plans is that your proposed electrical closet is indeed large enough to house the clear working space for your electrical panel (30" wide by 36" deep, though not necessarily centered on the panel), as well as a future subpanel adjacent to the existing panel and ...


1

I think I just found a good solution! from: https://www.diychatroom.com/threads/laundry-room-question-ontario-canada.684289/ Someone made the comment: "My preferred method is come out of a panel KO with a short run of non-flex metallic conduit to a generous 2-gang box (e.g. 120mm if you have them in CA), fit your AFCI-GFCI there" Genius! I can use ...


0

The laundry is a dedicated 20 a circuit if using the NEC. There is no maximum under the code for number of receptacles in residential but there is for commercial / industrial. As for the lighting circuits 80% of the breaker size is the max load allowed for load calculations normally 600 sf / 15 amp circuit or 800 sf for a 20 amp circuit is used. Since you ...


2

You are looking for a Siemens BL2 (not to be confused with a Siemens BL) ITE Blue Line loadcenters appear to use a special style of "thin" breaker instead of the more "typical" QP (EQ-P) breaker. Unfortunately, the ITE Blue Line (not to be confused with the other type BL breaker, which is the bolt-down version of the QP and thus no use ...


0

You don't need to name every single outlet. Just a descriptor that covers most of the outlets. You also must use labels that make sense to people not your family: so "Angie's Room" is Right Out.


4

The main thing is to watch your stab limits. Breakers clip on to panel parts called "bus stabs". They have a practical current limit, often stated on the panel label. Some people get it in their head "put the biggest breakers up top" (as if to reduce the few inches current must flow down the bus, as if that matters). Then they fit a ...


3

Rooms without a clear, unlikely to change, definable purpose (i.e kitchen, bathrooms, etc) are better referred to by compass direction than current function (2nd Fl NW rather than christy's bedroom or guest room or office...) and likewise if there are multiple bathrooms per floor, say. Or, go commercial, print out a floorplan, assign numbers to rooms, and ...


4

One circuit or feeder to an outbuilding If you install a 120/240V split-phase #6 feeder, you have to get rid of the #10 circuit. Then you would feed the well from the subpanel you plan. The only exception is if a circuit is a different voltage (no luck here), or a different usage - classically, a circuit switched from the source for yard lights, well, etc. ...


1

Remove the existing, under the condition you describe you are only allowed a single feeder set to a detached building. And give yourself a bit of a break on fill and pull a #8 ground, it's good up to 100A.


2

I'm not sure if this is appropriate, but I thought I would post the final "product" as this is how it looks after I did the upgrade with everyone's input. Of interest, I got a new inspector as I wasn't happy with the input from the last one. I also asked this guy to come by before I had finished (at his usual rate) to make sure he was happy with ...


1

Aside from the electrical concerns, whoever installed your plumbing pipe and cut notches in the bottoms of all the floor joists, SERIOUSLY weakened the floor system. Sure, you can cut all sorts of holes into the web of the joist, but DON'T cut the bottom chord. If those joists were 10" or a foot deep, they probably don't have the strength of a 2x6 now....


1

I assume the 2nd pic is the sub-panel in your garage? If so, you should be fine installing the breaker for the hot-tub in the garage, since it has a 125 amp feed. That is unless you have lots of other simultaneous heavy loads, which I don't see breakers for. Just because the amperage of the breakers adds up 170 amps in that panel isn't a problem. ...


0

The panel makes the rules Beyond the NEC 210.4(B) call for common disconnect (i.e. an identified handle tie or multi-pole breaker) for multi-wire branch circuits, the old "rule of six" for service/structure disconnects, and the favorable treatment NEC 705.12(B)(2)(3)(b) gives to "opposite end" solar/DG feed-ins, the layout of breakers in ...


0

Start at the disconnected end of the unused wire and follow it back to the other end removing it as you go. You should do this while the power is turned off. if it comes to a branching junction remove it and re-make the join (or leave a stub with a cap on it) check the other branches to see if they are used.


-1

It is possible for 2 breakers to control the same circuit because you have 2 legs of 110 coming from the pole. Lets say leg one of 110 coming from the power company is labeled leg A and the other is leg B when combined you get 220V. If breaker # 1 is powered by leg A of the power coming into the panel and breaker # 7 is powered by leg A of the power coming ...


1

Ground yes. Neutral no. You can do that with safety ground. You cannot do that with neutral. Neutral needs to come over to the new panel that the hots are served out of. This is easier to justify when using a type of metal conduit which itself is a valid grounding path, which is typically NOT the flexible kinds. EMT is a little more work but takes care of ...


2

(I should have answered this last year when I actually solved the problem.) My solution was a small piece of stick on velcro that secured the door when it was closed, and then released the door with a small tug. As it was placed on the inside of the door it was not noticeable when the door was closed, and it was also thin enough that the door looked ...


1

Option 2 is probably not an option at all - that setup is almost always for a special-rate storage electric water heating tariff and is only on for a few hours when demand is low overnight (which is why it's a special lower rate) or else it's switched off whenever loads are high (a different scheme, similar concept.) For my utility, you can keep them if you ...


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