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4

I recently did the exact same thing you're evaluating. We used a conversion kit to install a pendant light above our sink where there was previously a recessed light. As far as dimmability goes, that's mostly up to the switch and the bulb you have, i.e. you have to have a dimmer switch and a compatible, dimmable bulb. We went with Leviton in this particular ...


3

That connection method should have no effect on dimmability - I've used dozens of replacement can lights that use such an adapter on dimmers, and they work fine. The more common problem I've experienced with dimming a single fixture with LEDs is that many of the LED-compatible dimmers have a minimum wattage as well as a maximum wattage that they will dim on ...


2

This house needs AFCI breakers. Badly. It has old cloth-wrapped AC or MC cable, which has perished badly. You already see horrendous arc damage on one of the bottom wires; that kind of thing burns houses down. And AFCI breakers detect that type of arc-faulting, and trip the breaker to stop it. That cable has to go. Every single one of these cables has ...


1

Not a direct answer, but a way to clue you in if nobody else comes along with an answer: I had to diagnose the wiring on my house when I first moved in. What I did, I first turned off the power on the circuit, then after being sure it was off, I connected a little 9V battery across two wires. I had my wife stand at the other light switch, and with a ...


1

Most such lamps use 12 volts AC, which is considered safe in terms of electric shock. The reason for this is that a minimum current is required before muscles contract, preventing one from letting go of the wires. For most people, 10 mA at 60 Hz is considered safe, other than if the current were to go directly through a vital organ (e.g. during open-heart ...


3

Lamps below the low contact voltage are not uncommon. I have installed many “fancy” systems that the conductors are not insulated and the lamp holders clip on to the wires . Some fixtures have fancy looking loops with the same exposed wiring. I am sure it scared the #%%^ out of you but it is not dangerous. I think it is 15vac and 30vdc


2

I have used LED strips for full room indirect lighting. I mounted them on one inch angle aluminum. Following is a picture taken in my previous house where the LED lighting replaced fluorescent lighting. In my present house I had special wood moldings made to hide the aluminum-mounted LED strips.


0

Most hardware stores sell bulb changing extension poles: I can't tell from the picture if there is a decorative shroud over the bulb; if there is I would change the light fixture. I had my GC put 20 year LED puck lights in hard to reach areas in my home (indoor and outdoor). You might consider this too if it fits the rest of the decor.


0

Hook the white wire from the fixture to the group of white wires under the red wire nut. The black wire from the fixture goes to the single black wire in the box. It appears that the person who originally wired this used two 12-2 instead of a 12-3 going from the fixture to the switch. I think the NEC frowns on this. OK, if this is a switch loop, then forget ...


3

What you've got here is power in to the fixture box, power out to whatever is next and a "switch leg" cable to the switch. You are probably right that the wires from the fixture were connected to the blacks with the wire nuts. Unfortunately this isn't best practice, dangerous at best. This setup leaves the fixture "hot" all the time and effectively ...


2

Standard UK loop in wiring. The 3 reds joined together will be live in, live out (to the next light) and live down to the switch. The 2 blacks joined together willl be neutral in, neutral out.* The black on its own should be sleeved brown (was sleeved red) for switched live.* The new light connects to * and * (and earth, if it's not doiuble insulated). ...


1

Your new fixture connects just like the old one. Don’t get upset that someone did not follow the proper color code as your code has changed over the years. Connect your new fixture to the same 2 wires that the existing fixture is connected to. Those brown wires are high temp fixture wire and usually connect to a fixture. I would go back to there splices but ...


2

Same problem - I am looking at using 2 little giant ladders and a metal work plank to get up there. It doesn’t look like fun. I did watch a video were a platform was built in the stairwell and then a ladder placed on that. Didn’t see fun either... (source)


4

You can try this type of ladder. It allows for a configuration like this on a staircase: Here is another option that might work as well.


2

There's no standard for this type of twist'n'lock and no reason for manufacturers to adopt one, so your best bet is to find a brand name or a label somewhere, probably hidden inside the part of the fixture that is mounted the wall. IKEA has a similar fixture but it is unlikely to be compatible. Still useful if you want to change both. Make sure you follow ...


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