New answers tagged

2

This is the surest sign of your 13W limit: the GU24 plate here looks plastic I bought a track light fixture for my previous house that had four GU24 halogen bulbs (50W). Those things got HOT. The socket, however, was ceramic inside a metal housing. It could survive the heat. Plastic here will not handle that.


3

I get where early LEDs didn't make much of an impression, with their blueness and rather terrible CRI. That didn't just bother you, it also bothered people in the LED business. As a direct result, they fixed it. Very thoroughly. Of course it's still possible to buy cheap, janky LEDs; in fact it's pretty easy. All the usual cheap outlets await. ...


5

If I buy a GU24 to E26 adapter and install a 30- or 60-watt incandescent in it: Is there a risk of fire because the fixture can't handle the heat produced by a 14+ watt light bulb? Is there still a risk if I remove the glass fixture and just screw the light bulb into the adapter? Would a 14+ watt light bulb potentially cause overheating in the ...


2

Without getting into how these fixtures are rated (you will find out soon) my answer to your three questions is "yes". Sockets will always have a higher rating than the fixtures that use them and it's the fixture rating that counts. Think of it like this: your car can go 100 miles per hour but you're on a winding road with cliffs on each side so the speed ...


3

The old smart switch is not capable of controlling a fan and light separately... and you never claimed it did. That means your 3 cables are Supply (always-hot) Onward (always-hot) power to something else (Switched-hot) power to the fan/light First, all grounds get nutted together with a pigtail that you'll need to buy, and get pushed into the back of the ...


0

Assuming set of wires in the middle ( bottom right ) are hot and that you know the other 2 sets of wires go to the fan and light : Your double switch has 4 terminals on it. Take note that on one side of it there is a jumper which connects 2 terminals together. Let's call that your "hot side". The other side of that switch has 2 terminals on that AREN'T ...


1

As you have now learned the hard way, always take a picture BEFORE disconnecting any wires. That way (a) you can put things back to the original configuration if necessary and (b) the original configuration can help others trying to figure out what is going on. That being said, the simple setup would be: One set of wires = power in from panel. Presumably ...


1

I know with "some" track lighting it matters which way you twist them in. Which ever way you tried, try it again from the opposite direction. There are slots up in the tracks that must line up with the light


1

If there is power to the sockets and the bulbs are good, then it is a "bulb-to-socket" problem. Are you sure the bulbs are inserted such that they are making proper contact? Sometimes fixture housings prevent some bulbs from inserting all the way. In fact, I have some fixtures that require special 'long neck" bulbs...


1

Try a bulb that aims light where you want it Don't put a shade on it. Get an LED "bulb" that aims the light exactly where you want. If you wanted light in all directions, a screwball CFL certainly will do that. (As will an incandescent or a corn-cob LED, which intentionally aims light in all directions). However LEDs actually generate a cone of light;...


2

Those threads are indeed designed for attaching screw-on shades. Usually I see them used for table lamps where the socket and bulb are pointing up and the fabric shade (open on top and bottom) diffusing light with no glare from looking at the bulb. I would imagine it could work the same for you, just "upside" down... Try a lamp shop.


4

Welcome to the world of recessed lighting. I've run into this a few times and have used common springs. You have to shape the ends to fit into the can. Rubber bands and elastic string won't stand up to the heat long term. Instead, exact replacements are available online at $1.18 for two. Since you're installing 40 trims and need two "springs" per trim, ...


1

Figure Out What You Have First The instructions below are based on a typical configuration. This is very likely to be the case if: The 2 Black/White cables are currently connected together Power is coming in on one (and if you disconnect them, only one, of the black wires). You need a tester to verify this before continuing. If these 3 cables are all ...


0

You probably have a supply line in, a traveler out to the switches, and two switch legs (red and black) coming back. This is an educated guess. You absolutely need to get an inexpensive tester and find out what is hot. Trying to install your fixture without it is dangerous.


3

You need to just install a new loop. But, fortunately, the fix is pretty cheap and simple. I don't think glue is going to do it. You'll want to shop around for one that matches the color, size, and so forth, but here's a ring on Home Depot's website as an example, and another one from Menard's website. You might want to take the chandelier apart first and ...


0

You're not gonna like the answer. Glue won't work. You need to replace that hoop. Take the chandelier down from the ceiling unthread the wires from the chain all the way to the hoop. The hoop unscrews from the chandelier. You'll have to go to a lighting/lamp store to get a new hoop, I doubt your home store will have it. Then just reverse everything you did ...


2

I appreciated everyone's comments and wanted to follow up with what seems to be the answer. My latest bulb has not burned out, and it has been 10+ months. Apparently I'd simply had a streak of bad luck with the bulbs I'd bought. My hypothesis that my usage or lack of usage of air conditioning in various seasons affected the electricity of the oven seems ...


0

Check with your Condo Association Board. They probably have a committee that reviews modifications to the individual units. I wanted to install flood lights in the back, the board approved it but the neighbors in back of me had to sign an "ok" form.


2

IANACO (I am not a condo owner) This seems like something that won't be in the rules because no one thought it important. Probably no rule about using your deck for landing starship shuttles either. Same idea. That said. Simple courtesy requires that you not disturb the other owners. So... A: Wire it up with a 3 way switch with a switch on each ...


2

Turn off the power at the wall switch. If there are others in house while you are doing this, tape the switch in the off position or attach a note to it, and inform all others in the house that they are not to flip this switch while you are working on it. Safer yet is to turn off the breaker to this circuit in the consumer unit. The black coloured ...


4

I suggest that you don't have the right to interfere with communal wiring and lighting, one because it is not part of your property (leased, rented or owned) and two, because you may not have the qualifications or insurance coverage to do that work. However, If you want a light for your door controlled by a motion detector then there are LED lights with ...


2

I would scrape off the paint in that circle to see what is there - you might find screws etc If not then I have used a bradawl in the past to find the joist - usually light fittings are close to joists for support or an extra piece of wood is fitted between two joists to provide support.


2

The ballast etc is inside the Eterna LEP13 lampholder and you can just change the lampholder or the pendant and leave the ceiling rose as it is. This is a misguided attempt under Building Regs that require a certain proportion of lighting points in new build houses to be 'low energy'. Similar product from MK https://www.ebay.co.uk/c/1412633868


2

G24q-1 bulbs do not take mains voltage I agree that the 8-terminal block is the standard UK mains splice. However, there must be a ballast or driver circuit between the mains connection and the G24q socket. You must account for that before you can rewire. My concern is that they may simply be using common UK wiring kit to extend from an external ...


-1

Do a little trench in the wall / ceiling and bury a proper plastic conduit, nexy tou'll just have to 'pull' new wire


3

...ever seen lights that use this kind of box for hanging? No, because that box is not made for directly attaching anything to it. The box needs an adapter ring attached to hang a standard fixture (or to mount switches, receptacles, etc.) By itself that is just a junction box called a "4-S" (for 4" square). Look for a 4-S to 4-O plaster ring. It goes ...


0

Rotation is critical. If you're off center with the first clip's position the width of the glass between clips grows quickly. Set the first clip exactly at the center of a side and press it outward, then work the other two over.


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