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3

It sounds like you have a defective range. Check with the manufacturer. Perhaps there is some secondary grounding point that you need to remove/reconfigure. Or they may consider this a warranty repair. Depending on the wiring (some ranges are really simple, some are not) you may be able to take things apart to track down where there is an improper connection ...


1

Absolutely fine. Pigtail the hot and neutral line wires to connect GFCI line, incoming wires and outgoing (not protected) wires. Even if the receptacle supports two wires per terminal, pigtails have some advantages: You get a bit more wire length to work with when installing the receptacle - limited by the pigtail rather than shortest of the two wires It ...


1

If the GFCI has provisions for multiple wires then yes, if not you may have to get some wire connectors and a couple correctly colored wires and make a pigtail connection.


0

I mean, the easiest answer here is two timers, right? Seems like a lot of extra work and worry to rewire something that could be solved by two timers. Even better, make them smart switches and add all kinds of extra control if you want it.


0

Just change the second outlet to a gfi and line side everything on the first and second outlet. Now light is no longer on load of gfi but both outlets are still protected.


2

It may be possible to add a circuit and split where things are fed from. The best option would be to add heavy duty covers or in use covers with proper seals as code requires on outside receptacles in wet locations this keeps the receptacles dry so they won’t be the cause of the trip. If the garage is attached to the home adding circuits is much easy and ...


1

Remember: the run from service panel to first AFCI must be either metal-jacketed cable or metal conduit. I would find that drawing very confusing. It's always a struggle to show neutral on a white background (hint: don't), but what ere they thinking? White is the legally required neutral color, and black is the conventional hot color. So that bung ...


3

Any branch of the circuit whose hot and neutral are plugged into the "Load" terminals, will be protected from that GFCI. You are required to label those outlets "GFCI Protected" (NEC 110.3(B) and 8(C) of instructions). Use any labeling method that isn't handwritten. Also mark "No Equipment Ground" if applicable (NEC 406.4(D)2)....


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No. You are correct. Pressing the test button is an electrical test which should do absolutely nothing without power. If that is happening, either the wiring is not what you expect or the GFI outlet is defective. I suggest completely unwiring the GFI outlet to determine which is the cause. PS. It should not be necessary to remove the cover to determine if ...


4

Ok 2 parts, yes you are misunderstanding how a (listed) GFCI completes its test. The test is completed by the internal circuitry creating an imbalance. The clicking noise you hear is the mechanical debounce that helps the reset function work better (not all GFCI’s use this method but many do because who would trust a micro switch smaller than a pencil ...


0

The NEC in 250.130(C) now requires extending an Equipment Ground Conductor to the grounding system when making an extension of a two-wire circuit that does not have an EGC. If your circuit was extended before the current requirement or was extended by local exception then the receptacle needs to be marked " No Equipment Ground" and the ground ...


3

This is a no no and you should remove that jumper. Some DIYer wired that before checking this site. You might want to check inside the main panel to see if you can find any more weird stuff.


3

The ground being tied to the neutral is a code violation and should be removed. If the GFCI has power and will not reset after that it has failed and needs to be replaced. They are designed to fail in a safe or off position.


0

mine is similar in first diagram...on 3 wire...load side neutral can't share when coming back from line side cause my situation..source is in the end of the room from inside while gcfi is on outside wall from other side of room in my detached garage that share both rooms...thing is ..one is incomplete room..everything is cover but its barebones that i can ...


1

There are basically two options: New Breaker This is the simplest option, though probably not the least expensive. And may not even be possible, depending on the breaker panel. Replace the existing 20A double breaker with a GFCI 20A double breaker. If you can do that, then the wiring is easy: Blacks together Red to hot on new (ordinary) duplex receptacle ...


1

Can you come off the 50 amp feed for LED lights, yes. But what you have now is a non fusible disconnect, not a sub panel that can add another breaker for your LED lights. You can not just stick a 15 amp wire for lights under the 50 amp terminal and run your lights. (the wire would melt long before the breaker trips if there was an issue). You will need to ...


2

Your electrician is way wrong a 1.5Kw device only draws 12.5 amp a 20a breaker won’t trip below 2400w for current (usually beyond that for current based on an inverse time ratio). Microwaves convert the power to RF the wave shaping creates harmonics that the AFCI can not tell what they are. The AFCI thinks they are arcs and trips. This tripping gets more ...


6

If the wiring is 12 awg it is safe. I caution folks that want to upsize parts to check the wiring because sometimes a breaker was upsized to prevent un wanted tripping. A 20 amp GFCI really doesn't provide any thing that a 15 amp will except the ability to plug in a 20 amp device. When was the last time you saw a 20 amp plug on an appliance? They are out ...


4

TL;DR Test with an extension cord to another GFCI It is probably the machine. Unlike the situations with refrigerators, where water is not involved (except the ice maker) and where food spoilage is a big concern, washing machines have no real "excuse" not to be on GFCI. Plus GFCI is mandated for the the laundry room under current code, so the ...


0

GFCI outlets don't provide over-current protection, only ground fault protection. If you were fairly adept, you could make up a short extension cord with the wires separated (or carefully butcher one you have into 3 separate wires. And if you have an multi meter with an "amp clamp" you could put the amp clamp around the ground wire and plug it into ...


1

It's possible that code might require this to be an AFCI/GFCI breaker, so you might be violating code if you do this, fair warning. With that said, the black wire is the hot wire, which should go to the new breaker. The white wire is the neutral, which should go to your neutral bus. Your question itself shows that you only have a passing familiarity with ...


6

If you look carefully at your old outlet, you’ll see that there is embossed on the outlet “line” near one pair and “load” near the other. The line wires are the power feed and the load wires run onto more outlet and/or lights that are also protected by the GFCI. If you want, you can connect the load wires to the load terminals of the new GFCI. However, then ...


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