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1

It may be a faulty tester, or a faulty ground. The tester relies on a wired ground to simulate the ground fault. In fact they won't work on ungrounded connections, and that's not a defect.


0

Trip time is not part of the specs for GFCIs or the test circuits, only the level, which is between 4 and 6mA of current that is NOT returning on the neutral. It could be that your handy tester is using a current limiting resistor inside to test the circuit that takes 3-5 seconds for the trip threshold to exceed that value. The test button on the GFCI ...


0

The easiest solution is to make every receptacle on the line a GFCI receptacle. That would require you to remove the circuit from the load side of the original GFCI and pigtail it to the circuit and install each receptacle on the line side. That will give you GFCI protection but if there is a trip it will only be for the equipment you have plugged in at that ...


1

Yeah, if you can find one. I've never noticed any GFCI breakers on the market that large, but other than that, your concept is sound. The only issue with putting a lot of stuff on a single GFCI breaker is sometimes, you can have enough devices each with a tiny amount of leakage to add up to enough to trip the GFCI. However that probably won't be an ...


4

Is there any benefit to tripping a GFCI receptacle when it's not in use? Does big current draw make GFCI outlets go bad? I'd say you're over-optimizing. You only need 1 GFCI outlet on a circuit, and it'll last about 10 years. That's around $2/year. That's if GFCI outlets degrade from simply being attached to power; the second linked question indicates ...


4

If the outlets serve a countertop then they need to be GFCI protected. The 6' distance you refer to is for sinks not installed in kitchens.


3

It sounds like, from the huge amount of discussion in the comments, that you have already expended enough energy on this to have been able to go to the store and buy the necessary tap. The tap you need will likely cost just a few US dollars. The tap size needed for US style electrical fixture mounting screws is #6 - 32 NC. You can even use the small tap ...


2

Remember you can just fit a GFCI upstream of here All GFCI devices have the ability to protect downline locations. So if you know where this outlet location is fed from, then you can simply fit the GFCI device there instead, and leave the receptacle as you found it or use a plain receptacle. I mention that because a lot of people don't think it's GFCI ...


3

You may just need a better support plate, like this one from Home Depot: "Mounting holes are pre-tapped to accept devices faster"


0

None of the outlets are grounded, so I don't know why this one would read differently. Most likely your first two outlets are grounded (though not necessarily in a reliable and code-compliant way). Even if there are no explicit ground wires boxes and devices can still be grounded through armored cables, metallic conduits etc. Anyway, does this matter? ...


4

In response to your question: DO NOT connect the two conductors together. Two things you need to pay attention to. First make sure that the conductors have not been painted over. In many cases the conductors appear to be the same color, but by scratching and scrapping the true color will become apparent. Second, because general house wiring is in NM and ...


2

Assuming that the outlet was working, then no, do not splice them together. One of the white wires must be the hot and the other neutral, despite them both being white. Find that would make me very nervous about the house wiring in general. Do you know if the house was previously owned by a tinkerer who might have added that outlet? Any idea who wired the ...


2

There is no issue in sharing the neutral as it is on the LOAD side of the GFCI. Bathrooms do have specific codes which is pretty technical. I'll try to sum it up: All receptacles within a residential bathroom must be GFCI protected. If only one bathroom is being fed by a single 20A circuit, the lights and other small appliances like exhaust fans may also ...


6

Generally speaking, you don't want to have a fan/light - or more specifically, a light - on GFCI because if the GFCI trips due to something else on the circuit then you are in the dark. As I understand it (I am not an electrician, but I have seen other questions on this topic and I heard this from my own electrician years ago when he installed heat/fan/light ...


0

did they wire the receptacles in series or parallel? if in series all it takes is one to fail and rest will stop or sounds like in this case the wire failed somewhere in between. if you have power at breaker and nothing at outlet definitely a broken wire either the hot leg or neutral


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