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You have a break in the circuit somewhere. The procedure to diagnose the location is to start from the beginning of the circuit (the breaker) and follow the pipe or cable to the first junction. Open the box, and check for voltage. You should use both a non-contact voltage sensor as well as a multimeter to test. The problem with using a sensor is that it may ...


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Take some long- nose pliers and clinch the battleships where they go around the front edge of the box. This will keep the battleship from wandering into the center of the box.


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Replace the box with a newer box that has a little more clearance. You might need to shave away some drywall but who cares that's easy enough. Electrical tape is for hacks and adding an insulator on the side isn't ideal, you don't want anything in there extra that you don't have to


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The first rule of GFCIs You have connected the GFCI's neutral pigtail to the neutral bar correctly. The only thing that can explain several GFCIs failing in every iteration of your rather exhaustive testing - is also one thing you did not mention. The first rule is: All hot and neutral current MUST come through the GFCI device. Because, the basic function ...


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Just to be sure... On the new sub panel, is the the new circuit in question a Multiwire branch circuits (common neutral). Single pole GFCI breakers will not work on a MWBC. Doesn't sound like your problem, but just wanted to cover this base.


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From the added information in the comments, this 2-gang box is only 3-5/8" wide which is insufficient for the two modern outlets which are installed in the photo. Standard device boxes are 2" wide and this leaves plenty of room for a clean installation without resorting to hacks like tape. This old device box would be grandfathered and code ...


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First require / request the inspector to cite the code # to write a violation ,,, that is a legal requirement in my state, what state are you in? Even in my state under the 2020 nfpa70 code no AFCI is required on the 2 required 20 amp kitchen circuits that are GFCI protected,,,I have seen problems with inspectors for DIY including my self,,, moved to a ...


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So those metal cut-in boxes are really designed to be gangable switch boxes, but there's nothing wrong with using them as long as you don't violate wire fill allowances. They are a design from an older time when electrical devices were much smaller. They are not up to standard sizes of today and are inadequate for modern devices containing electronics. As ...


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Forget it - there's no such thing. UL is the reason. Manufacturers approached UL about creating just that, and UL said no - mainly the interest is in the industrial space. Why? As soon as you provide some sort of programmatic API for a GFCI or really any other protective device... some jackass will come along and write a script which automatically resets ...


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Not all GFCI outlets are made the same. Some have “Line” on the top, some have “Load” on the top. Check it. Don’t make the same mistake I did assuming you can simply pull an outlet and replace the new one the exact same way.


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To me, I'm seeing an old style, outlet for standard accessory use, with a bonus, switched lamp outlet. You plug your electric clock (in the old days) into the accessory outlet and it stays on. Like you would want. The lamp only comes on and goes off when you hit the switch. Like you would want. I would eliminate the switch and just use the other circuit to ...


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Finally I am able to solved this issue. This is the configuration I described earlier. Electric Panel---20A Circuit Breaker---GFCI (Kitchen)----Load1---Load2---Load3---Load4 But I forgot to mention that there were 3 more wall sockets connected in parallel to the GFCI. same 20A Circuit Breaker-----GFCI----Load1----To ---Load4 same 20A Circuit Breaker------...


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If replacing the device yourself is something you'd consider then you're all set to pull it out of the wall and test it. With the power off, remove the faceplate and then remove the device itself from the wall. Don't disconnect any wires just yet; only remove the two mounting screws so that you can pull the outlet and its attached wires out of the junction ...


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Any circuits fed off a GFCI or RCD device must have total monogamy between live and neutral wires. Any load served by the hot must be served by the neutral. And vice versa. Some amateurs are in the habit of "borrowing neutral" from any old circuit that happens to be nearby. Their logic being that neutral is like the chassis on a car with car ...


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