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2

That tester. Don't read too much into it. It's a hokey-dokey tester. They work in new construction with all new products and open walls, because that work only tends to see a few types of problems. The product is tuned for that. When troubleshooting old work, they are wrong far more than they're right. That's bad because it send you on wild goose chases ...


1

Here's what I did. I took @Harper 's advice and made the line out on the right side of the box pick a circuit and pigtailed whites and one hot line for the outlet. However, instead of pigtailing reds and connecting blacks, I pigtailed blacks and connected the reds because the outlet wasn't working on reds (it's possible I may have had something loose, but I ...


2

#2. On a separate note, why are the white wires to the disposal connected to the line out to the next outlets? That is completely wrong. I don't know what they were thinking! It sounds like you have 2 completely separate circuits in this box: One that powers the disposal, and a double circuit (MWBC) that powers the receps. When you have multiple circuits in ...


2

Check to make sure your spa heater is configured correctly for 240V operation The Balboa VS501Z uses a solid-state control board that is configurable for 120V or 240V operation; however, when in 120V mode, it requires a hardwire jumper from neutral to a L2 (red) connection on the board to configure it, as per the manual. If that jumper is present on a ...


6

By the rules, no. In practice, definitely! It's perfectly legal to put a GFCI in a 12 cubic inch "Handy-Box". However in practice good luck. In my book, you got the wrong box. I use the following: 4-11/16" square deep box, but one with "1/2" (13/16" actual) knockouts on the sides. Not to be confused with a 4x4 box; that'll be ...


8

A GFCI only requires the same fill as any other device. In your case with 14-2 one cable in one cable out and the device 4 current carrying conductors 1 ground ,x 2 device , clamp. 14 awg =2 so 2 x 8 or 16cu inch. 2 devices ? 20 cu inches? There should be plenty of room, if you get excessive with your wire length that will quickly gobble up room, if your ...


1

Never mind. I thought the GFCI switch in the master bathroom was controlling the outlets in the same room. After some testings, however, I found out that the outlets were actually controlled by a GFCI switch in the guest bathroom. All the devices are working fine. Thank you all for your suggestions. Very much appreciated.


1

It sound like he has an open neutral with something plugged in down the line to put voltage on the neutral. There should be something else on the circuit that is not working.


0

Replace the GFCI, it's shot Given that it's a modern GFCI that did this, it's trying to tell you "I'm broken inside and can no longer provide GFCI protection" when it's stubbornly refusing to reset. So, it's time to replace it with a new GFCI; if you need help with that, post a new question here with photos of the inside of the junction box in ...


3

Yes. There is often confusion between GFCI with AFCI. AFCI is arc fault protection and is mainly aimed at protecting wiring in the walls from arcing and sparking, which starts fires. . As such, in new work it must be at the breaker, since putting it at a receptacle would put the relevant wiring on the wrong side of the AFCI device. AFCI is required on many ...


4

As NoSparksPlease has pointed out you can find the requirement for GFCI protection in the NEC Article 210.8 and right in the first paragraph its states; The ground fault circuit interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location. As far as I know, that is the only requirement the NEC has for new installations. So whether you decide to use a ...


11

The Code doesn't specify location of protection. NEC 2017 210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel. Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel shall be provided as required in 210.8(A) through (E). The ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location. Th 2020 Code changes (E) to (F), ...


-2

I will put in a plug for a AFCI/GFCI combo breaker here. I just replaced a failed GFCI outlet in the kitchen with one of these on the outlet circuit in a QO load panel. Cost of a 20A breaker with pigtail $52 off the shelf at Lowes. Cost of a single 20A Eaton outlet GFCI only at Lowes - $18. The QO breaker went into a panel that already had a Square D ...


2

The ground is in no way connected with a 2 wire GFCI setup to convert to 3 wire. The GFCI doesn’t use ground itself but it can use it for grounding the yoke if available. Code allows a separate ground wire to be pulled so if you are really concerned about having things grounded this is a possibility


1

(NB: I'm not an electrician, just a homeowner who has done some electrical work) Related: Does a non grounded GFCI meet code? It is 'perfectly acceptable' in that it is compliant with code (as long as it is properly labeled, as you state). A GFCI if wired correctly should trip if there is a difference between the current coming in and the current going out (...


1

Condensation Some part of the circuit - a receptacle, switch, or junction of some sort - has a very minor ground fault. It is OK when warm and dry. When the air cools at night down to the dew point, water condenses. It bridges the ground fault and enough current flows through to trip the GFCI. With one quick search, I found a current dew point in Bangkok of ...


3

There is no reason electrically to leave it curled up. You'll be perfectly fine straightening it out. I'm assuming this is an add on to an existing panel. If a new panel, I'd seriously consider a PON (plug on neutral) style panel. This eliminates the need for the pig tail. Last year I wired my son's new house with a SquareD PON QO panel and loved how ...


0

Yes, it happens all the time that the main breaker pops before a branch circuit breaker. Anytime the current goes through 2 protective devices, you have a "race condition" as to which one pops first. In some cases where detection is much faster than the disconnection, you can have several devices trip at once, because they have all detected and ...


0

The answer is NO you can not use 2 separate GFCI’s to create 240v. You can not parallel breakers except in supervised or listed conditions The hot springs spas I have wired require a 30 amp 240v and a 20 amp 120v feed with a ground on the 240 that you don’t show all on a 50 amp feeder the actual wiring diagram was on the inside cover of the controller not ...


2

Probably Not Note: US-centric. Basic principles apply elsewhere but due to different implementation (e.g., whole-house RCD), this may not be the case in some places around the world. The key is that ground fault and regular breaker trip are two very different things. Regular Breaker The basic premise of a regular circuit breaker, whether a main breaker for ...


2

You cannot combine neutrals from two GFCI breakers; it just won't work. A GFCI functions by comparing current flow between hot and neutral (for a 120 volt breaker) or hot 1 and hot 2 (for a 240 volt duplex breaker). Because you've combined the two neutrals, the current between the hot and neutral won't balance. I have no information on modifying your spa, ...


0

Led lighting typically requires a transformer or power supply. The power supply is plugged in or hardwired somewhere that is hidden like under the sink or on top of the cabinets. Low voltage wire 18/2 is then typically run from this location to each location that requires led lighting. You could use your armored cable to carry low voltage if you know where ...


0

As you suspected your Christmas lights apparently tripped the GFCI. The trick is locating the controlling GFCI. In some homes built in the 70s and 80s garage, exterior and bathrooms are on the same GFCI circuit. The GFCI might be on the breaker as well. "I also checked the line and load sides of the GFCI plugs inside the house and both appear to be ...


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