New answers tagged

1

One GFCI protects it all in your case Since the feeder breaker is a GFCI, it provides GFCI protection to whatever is connected to it; think of it as providing a "zone of protection", if you will. This is enshrined in the NEC in 215.9: 215.9 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel. Feeders supplying 15- and 20-ampere receptacle branch ...


6

Your idea is fine Using a GFCI device in the first position to protect the entire circuit is a perfectly fine idea. It will work if the device is wired correctly and the rest of the circuit is (already) wired correctly. Lights definitely can be placed on GFCI (it just doesn't buy you much if they are also grounded). Both sidestep accidental "Line vs ...


1

You can indeed install a GFCI as a first device, but you need to know which are the incoming "Hot" (usually black) and "Neutral" ( white). As well and hopefully, there's a associated ground ( usually bare copper wire ) Lighting can be protected, but there would have to be a reason. And that would be " Can a person come in contact with a light fixture ". I ...


12

Lights? A GFCI can protect lights. You just usually don't need to protect lights. Lights that are installed out-of-reach in the ceiling are normally not required to be protected by GFCI simply because GFCI would not help. GFCI protects against current leaking through a person. If you can't touch the light, no current can flow through you. There are some ...


2

Yes. Get an extension cord (I assume they are all 3-prong in the UK). Slice down the edge of the cable and remove the outer sheath for about a foot. Don't cut into any of the insulation on the individual wires (though if you nick ground's insulation, don't worry about it). Bind the hot and neutral (brown and blue) wires tightly together with electrical ...


0

I would re-examine the plug. It gave you problems before and maybe the insulation and conductors are in worse shape than you thought. Next, try plugging the oven into a different outlet and see if the problem travels to the new outlet. You stated that it runs off a standard 13Amp outlet, not actually sure what that is as I'm in the U.S.A.


0

There are a variety of test. The simplest and cheapest is to test for continuity between the earth/chassis of the oven and the live/neutral. This you can do with any cheap multimeter. However it won't reveal groundfaults that only reveal themselves under high voltage which breaks down the insulation. Or you can DIY a short extension cord which runs the ...


1

Best method for homeowners would be to plug in something with noise ( Floor fan set on "high", vacuum cleaner, corded drill motor ) and firstly look at your panel breakers to see if the circuit you're interested in turning off is labeled... If you see a "potential candidate" breaker, then turn that one off first. If not, listen, turn one off and if your ...


5

You want to trip the overcurrent detector (breaker) serving a GFCI outlet. No. Don't do it. What you're looking for is so similar to the other question that it really is a duplicate. It is wrong for all the reasons that one is wrong (and not insane in a certain industrial setting for the reasons I describe in my answer there). The presence of GFCI is ...


0

I suppose this answer more properly belongs on the linked question rather than here, but.. if you really want to trip the overcurrent breaker and not trip the GFCI outlet, then the only thing to do is introduce an overcurrent. A dead short as proposed by answers in that related question is indeed an overcurrent, but it's also rather extreme. The thing to ...


1

Honestly, the safest way (assuming this is a receptacle circuit) is to use a plug-in wiring tester with a GFCI test button. Plug in, push button, done. No safety issues or hassles. And you really should own one as an electrical DIYer anyways.


0

Tripping a GFCI receptacle disconnects the hot power conductor at the receptacle. All GFCI receptacles have a TEST button which when pressed trips the GFCI receptacle. Tripping a GFCI breaker disconnects the hot power at the breaker (in the panel) for the entire circuit. There are devices called GFCI testers which when plugged into a GFCI protected circuit ...


1

The GFCI section will trip if any current leaves the hot wire without returning on the neutral wire. The circuit breaker will trip if more current leaves the hot wire than its trip rating, such as 15 or 20A. So, if you want to induce a trip on the breaker without tripping the GFCI outlet, you simply need to draw more current than the breaker's rating ...


5

Whoever told you that was referring to ***A***FCI breakers, and only in the context of a GE panel. In every other case, they don't know what they're talking about. A GFCI operates by comparing the currents on all the normal/intended conductors to assure that current in = current out To do that, it needs access to all the conductors at once (not ground)....


4

Never gonna work. Sorry, but even if you might be able to get one at a time to work, GFCI on MWBC is based on the breaker comparing "all hot" to "all neutral". Two electrically separate breakers simply can't do that. The handle tie requirement satisfies the general MWBC safety issue of making sure that if one is off for maintenance then the other is off as ...


1

GFCI is a concept, not a socket You have for years been dealing with one type of GFCI device: the GFCI+receptacle combo device. Your line of thinking is that all GFCIs are this. GFCIs come in a variety of packages. A plain GFCI-only (actually you'd recognize that immediately) A GFCI+breaker A GFCI-that-is-a-switch (it uses TEST/RESET for ON/OFF) A ...


1

Go for it Since you have a full four-wire connection to a NEMA 14-30 receptacle, your plan to replace the breaker with a GFCI breaker is sound, as long as the dryer is properly configured for use with a 4-wire cord. Note that this will also let you know if your dryer has a ground fault, so you may wish to keep an appliance repairman's phone number on hand ...


2

It could be either one. The point is the loop is leaking to earth, and it shouldn't do that, and you should go through it and look at all the connection points. It's unlikely to be the cable unless he used indoor rated cable. DVMs are inconclusive. Obviously a low voltage reading is a problem, but some ground faults act like VBOs - they don't ...


16

Overloads don't trip a GFCI. Period. If there was an overload, it would trip the actual circuit breaker. Since this is a GFCI/receptacle (as opposed to a GFCI/breaker) and the GFCI trips, that is a GFCI problem - 100% - and not an overcurrent situation. 14 AWG raises the question of the size of the breaker. If it is 15A then everything is good. If it is 20A ...


1

I got it figured out with the help of my electrician friend... Pigtail hot inbound and outbound wires with one of the hot wires protruding from back of the combo switch. Send the 2nd hot wire protruding from from of the combo switch to LINE brass/hot side. Take neutral inbound and outbound wires and pigtail to LINE silver/neutral side. Obviously connect ...


4

GFCI lights and fans Naturally, the electricians did not GFCI-protect that light, so I want to move it to the GFCI-protected line coming into the master bath Naturally. Lights and fans don't need GFCI protection. However fans do have a tendency to have minor ground faults. Is there a reason you want to protect them? Keep in mind there's a side ...


3

Talking to the AHJ, he says yes, the new circuit must be 20amps. (FYI, we are now under 2017 NEC). He also cleared up an ancillary issue I've seen debated inconclusively elsewhere: is it ok to attach that shower fan/light to the same GFCI circuit as the bathroom outlets ? The answer: it is, if and only if the GFCI circuit supplies only that bathroom. ...


4

This is exactly WHY there is a TEST button. The TEST button is so that you can "test" the device. There are known failure modes, and because this is a life-safety device, testing is important. Many newer GFCI devices actually have automatic testing since most people don't bother with monthly (or yearly) tests of their GFCI devices. The automatic testing ...


5

This can happen, just replace the GFCI outlets in question The TEST button on a GFCI creates an actual ground fault (about 6-8mA, maybe up to 10mA, from load-hot to line-neutral or vice versa), so if a GFCI fails to trip when the TEST button is pressed, then it's dead and needs to be replaced. This can happen due to improper wiring (backfeeding a GFCI's ...


2

GFCIs detect ground faults within appliances. AFCI's detect arcing faults, usually in wiring in the walls, but sometimes in appliances. But the first law of GFCIs is these things only happen to other people. Your appliances don't fail! Seriously, people really do think that, and will spend hours and hundreds of dollars chasing every problem but that. ...


3

Trip diagnostics a-la QO The QO dual function and combination arc fault breakers use a somewhat peculiar procedure for trip reason readout, as detailed in the installation instructions: Turn the breaker OFF. Push and hold the TEST button for the remainder of the procedure Start a stopwatch at the same time you turn the breaker back ON Stop the stopwatch ...


5

There are no limits on the number of receptacles per 15A or 20A circuit in general, though there may be in some jurisdictions. See, for example Is there an average number of outlets that are wired off of one circuit breaker? A GFCI, whether as part of a breaker or combined with a pair of receptacles, is only monitoring for a difference between hot & ...


7

There's no limit. A standard GFCI will protect up to 20 amps, drawn from any combination of receptacles, either the built-in one or any number of additional ones connected to its load terminals. If you're trying to add GFCI protection to an existing circuit, you needn't worry about how many outlets are downstream on the 'load' side, assuming things are ...


5

That drawing cannot possibly work. Right off the bat, you are paralleling, providing two paths for neutral to go. That itself is a code violation, nevermind the GFCIs. It won't work because as Nate Strickland describes, neutral won't know which path to take. GFCIs involve looping all the wires of a circuit through a current transformer, where each wire ...


7

Close, but not quite. From the point of the two GFCIs onward, the neutrals must be kept separate. Consider: if you had a device drawing power on the black hot circuit from a load farther down the line, and nothing on the red, which GFCI would its neutral return current flow through? Since they're just connected in parallel in your diagram, it would flow ...


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