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2

On a tandem switch, "the tab" is for the usual situation where you have a black always-hot wire feeding both switches. Leave the tab and you can just hook one wire and be done. With the tab broken off, the two switches are completely independent, and wire exactly like two normal switches. However, these are both "old school switch loops that ...


3

The key problem is that the power is coming into the switch via a switch loop. That is perfectly legitimate, but it means that white is not neutral. The other cable might be of help, if it is on the same breaker as the switches/lights, but rewiring to take advantage of that could get a little complicated. The easiest solution, generally speaking, is to find ...


2

To answer your question, there's a simple rule about where you are allowed to take a neutral: You may use a neutral only if it is in the same cable as a hot wire already going to your switch. In both your boxes, you have 3-way switches that are totally isolated (except for safety ground) from the other wires in the box. Those must remain isolated, there ...


2

After some searching and testing, I think I have found the answer of my own question. First, the YouTube video: https://youtu.be/kwydife035I was very helpful for me to get an idea of where to start. I tested both outlets and apparently the previous person who wired the cable did not follow the conventional colors but here are what I found out: So I ...


6

There is no such thing as "common" in AC mains wiring. Each circuit is wired in a full loop. If you do automotive wiring, you tend to think of the metal vehicle chassis as the "common" all current returns to. Or in electronics you have the Vss backplane. Those concepts do not apply in AC mains. All circuits are full out-and-back with ...


3

The neutral is clearly from the circuit you are not changing the switch on, as it goes into and comes out of conduits with the [hot or switched hot - blue] and travelers (orange) connected to that [3-way] switch.


5

One thing you can try is an "extension junction box". For a finished-wall area like this, you want a fairly handsome one, such as a "Legrand Wiremold Surface Conduit Starter Box". They come in 1" or 2" tall, and you can see if the hole in the back of the 1" one will clear the KASA switch. They are made for being launch ...


7

This is a common problem. I had a similar problem simply replacing a ~ 60-year-old 2-wire duplex receptacle with a new (but nothing fancy, not GFCI) 3-wire grounded duplex receptacle. The solution: A bigger box. In my case it was easy because the wall was open. With a finished wall it isn't nearly as easy, but not impossible. Standard walls in the US give ...


1

Good news: this is mostly straightforward The good news is since the first switch box has neutral present at it, this is a fairly straightforward wiring task. First off, you need to figure out which bundle of "common" (neutral, really) wires corresponds to the incoming hot for this circuit, which'll require some tracing and matching up of wires (...


1

That's how a smart bulb works. You turn it on and off via the app/digital assistant. I have what looks to be the same bulbs but with what I believe are hundreds of different brands sold; these will be straight out of Shenzhen. In this case therefore a 'smart switch' is substituting for a traditional switch, so instead of breaking the live wire to the light ...


5

Yes. Assuming I've traced it properly, those two switches both share the same hot, meaning they also share the same neutral: You'll want to verify this by confirming that one breaker (one circuit) powers the lights (or other loads) that are controlled by both switches. If not, you can simply use two different neutrals for the two smart switches. Looks like ...


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