New answers tagged

5

Yes, that job as-done is incorrect, though I could see where a novice working with poor instructions might think it is correct. You need one of the types of boxes mentioned by Jack or Machavity. In particular, note how you have the Romex or UF coming through the oval holes. I get where that makes sense. However actually those oval holes are variable ...


9

As Jack noted, you really really need a junction box here. As mounted, the wires could rub against the metal plate. A pancake might be overkill, though (and you do need a NM clamp for those). I would recommend a joist junction box instead It's fan rated, requires no clamps, and you can attach your plate to it easily. Oh, and you don't need to ground a ...


4

I'm not going to swear to this but I'm pretty sure you need an electrical box installed and this disk attached to it. The feed wires enter the box with the correct clamps. See photo below. Then ground the box and the disk get grounded when screwed to the box but that's not needed because the fixture has its own ground wire. You don't need to tape the wire ...


1

Generally, assume you want a 4" octagon box, which is 3.5" on the flats and 4" in the cornerish dimension. If it just fits inside a 4" square box, that's the one. They also make a 3.5" octagon box, which is 3" across the flats and 3.5" cornerish. That is generally too small, and this size is largely deprecated. You can get a plate to adapt 4" boxes to ...


0

Yes a small induced voltage difference is often present, particularly with a flat cord where the ground and neutral are different distance from the hot.


0

The voltage measurements are normal any reading from ~112 to 125 vac hot to neutral is normal throughout the US. A small voltage neutral to ground is also very common. if the voltage gets above 2.5 volts I have seen switching supplies have problems. But your measurements would point to the controller not the junction box. Having a motor load like a garbage ...


2

Yes, because of voltage drop If you've ever done a voltage drop calculation, let's say you want to run a 12A well pump load. You do the calculations and it says you'll have 6 volts of voltage drop, so 114V. OK. Well, how does that happen? There are TWO wires - hot and neutral. Is the voltage drop shared across both? Yes. Each one drops 3 volts. ...


1

As all of the other answers indicate, you must use a proper NM clamp. To the best of my knowledge national and local electrical codes always require a clamp for any cable entering any kind of device box. One of the reasons for a box in the first place is to facilitate replacement and repair. If the cable were not clamped while you were then fiddling with the ...


1

Use a NM clamp The correct thing to use is not a grommet, but a NM clamp, as the latter grabs the cable's jacket and strain-relieves it to the box. They are available in a few different types (some are metal, others are plastic), and install into a standard 1/2" knockout, either using a locknut (for metal and some plastic types), or simply by snapping into ...


3

I have the same lights myself. You either need a NM clamp or some sort of plastic grommet to secure the wire. NM clamps are easier to find in most cases. You need 1/2" clamps, but they may be labeled 3/8". Remember to only remove the knockouts you need, or you'll need to plug one at the end of your run. Be sure to screw the box down before attaching the ...


7

You don't use a grommet in this application but rather an appropriate clamp. The correct type depends on what you are connecting here but the usual thing for non-metallic cable is something like this: https://images.homedepot-static.com/productImages/7b668807-9db0-42c3-86b1-e9ec7481045c/svn/halex-conduit-fittings-20511-64_1000.jpg


0

You'll have to bore the stud anyway, so I'd just nipple between the two panels Since you'll have to put a hole in the stud no matter what you do, I'd make that hole count as much as possible. How? Well, we start by scrapping the junction box and using a rigid metal conduit nipple between the adjacent sides of the two panels. This gets rid of a wire and a ...


1

If you add a box to extend the cables it will need to remain accessible. I would pull back to before the triple and drill down , it looks like there might be a level below (I think I see studs below And fire block foam where they go down?) After dropping down, route the cables back to their original termination. Without knowing more about the structure, ...


1

The good news: you have the wires you need The good news in your situation is that you have all four wires (two hots, a neutral, and a ground) present already (which makes me wonder why the NEMA 10 receptacle was installed in the first place, but I digress). This means that this circuit can safely power a 16A EVSE with ease. The bad news: electric car ...


2

You need to see if there's a ground inside the box For your application, equipment safety ground MUST be separate from neutral. let's examine the cases. There is neutral and a ground wire (or metal conduit) The NEMA 10 does not connect to this ground. You can extend off this outlet by tapping the two hots and ground (and neutral if your charger needs it)...


0

(I updated your use of 110/220 volts because that hasn't been widely available since the 1960s.) The answer is no. NEC does not allow multiple outlets on a 240 volt circuit. Anyway, wouldn't you rather a 50 amp 240 volt circuit for charging your vehicle?


7

It's your ground wires. They're on top. They're biffing onto a neutral or hot terminal. Also, you need to use the #10-32 screw in the steel box and put a pigtail on that, and join that to the ground wires. Alternately you could use ground clips to attach to the sides of the box. The key here, however, is to push the grounds into the back of the box ...


2

You have connected the light #2 incorrectly. The white wires should connect to the same side of the light socket just as you did at light #1. It appears from the pictures that the light sockets have have two screws for each side of the light. Two of these should be connected to the threaded sleeve part of the light socket and this is where you want to make ...


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