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4

My preference for this kind of work is to use all steel junction boxes and metal "EMT" conduit throughout. This generally puts the work beyond question or reproach; you don't have to worry about things like wires being pinched. Further, you are able to use the EMT conduit as your ground; meaning you only need to put 2 wires in the pipe. You actually ...


11

Do you need actual outlets? Chargers and lights can both be run off of USB, and a USB hub+extension cables doesn't even involve real wiring. It also works in both 120V and 240V countries with just a plug adapter as long as you get a 120/240V hub, which could be an issue if you just use regular outlets. I'm not sure there's any legal concerns, because you're ...


5

This looks like phone wiring, so no This appears to be telephone wiring, based on the thin gauge and the color coding. There likely was a telephone jack here at some point, but it was removed by a prior owner, leaving what you see here, which does you no good whatsoever in your quest to add a receptacle. Of course, it could be for some other low-voltage ...


1

i find that is often the result of the wires not having a proper z bend in them and are pushing the socket out on one side. The screws aren't able to counter the strength of the solid copper. bend the wires to hold the socket straight and all should fix itself.


1

The symptoms described point to the outlet being hot enough to instantly smoke oil, before the oil even possibly came into play. In short, your outlet was already melting down when the oil splash drew your attention to it. A little oil on the outside, even if it somehow did conduct and heat as a result, would not result in the inside being all burnt. Replace ...


0

Since you said the breaker is AFCI and the breaker is now tripping I would guess the controls in the air purifier or the heater control contacts are getting dirty. When contacts get dirty or pitted they arc more than new and will trip AFCI circuits. I love square d but AFCI and GFCI breaker troubleshooting stinks as they don’t have the indicators that other ...


3

Any answers to this will probably be based of the actual experience of the answerer. Cooking oil is not a good conductor of electricity. It could possibly trip a GFCI. Outlets like the one shown will fail over the years because their contacts lose their ability to "hold tight" due to the metals being annealed over time because of the current draw. My ...


9

I find that i can usually manipulate them into alignment. The tabs on the outlet that the screws go through attaching the outlet to the box are made of somewhat malleable metal. Turn the breaker off to the circuit so there is not ANY power to the box. You should use a non-contact voltage tester to insure that there is no power in the box to any wires. ...


6

At a certain big box home store with blue and white trim, they have a "Silver Steel Wall Plate Spacers" that look like this: These are purpose made for what you are trying to do. The description reads Innovative design helps repair electrical outlets that are too far recessed into the wall. Works with all switches, receptacle, and GFCIs. Installs quickly ...


2

You are in luck for making the outlet always hot. It looks to be wired as a simple switch loop. The only change required to make the outlet always hot is to separate the existing wirenut and replace the black on the outlet with the black that was pigtailed. You hadn't given any details of how you expect the switch location to control the new lights but if ...


0

First of all, figure out if the original wire is stapled or not. If it isn't then the solution is easy. CAUTION: Requires work IN the panel. If you are not 100% confident you can do this safely, call an electrician. It's not difficult, but you need to know exactly what you're doing. Turn off breaker. Cut pretty close to the box. Use this slack to do ...


0

I'd go in with a Dremel and a cutoff wheel and nip the wires at the screws on the outlet where the wires are short. Then I'd use nuts to extend those wires to a proper length with pigtails and tie in a new run to your moved outlet. The only reason I don't see this working is if you're in a low-profile box, where you'll not have room for wire nuts behind the ...


4

You'll have to move the electrical box You can't entrap an electrical junction box behind built-in furniture like that. Every box cover must be accessible without tools (obviously you need a screwdriver to remove the box cover itself, but those are the only screws you are allowed to turn). Further, you cannot splice anywhere but a junction box, and again,...


4

yes You can turn this into a 15 or 20 amp receptacle possibly even 2 circuits depending on how many wires in the cable. If there is Black, white and a ground you will need to move the wires around in the panel but a legal 15 or 20 amp 120v circuit can be set up. If this is a main panel Put the white on the neutral bus or the ground bus (if white and bare ...


2

The reason for the criss crossing of the wiring is to allow electricians to quickly identify faulty receptacles. In this method, if the receptacle experiences a short or becomes faulty, the 120v link through the outlet would be broken. Some receptacles short externally, some internally. This method quickly identifies the problem. It became un popular once ...


2

Connect the white wire between outlet #1 to #2 to the neutral screw on outlet #2. (Do not break the tab on the neutral side.) Break the tab on the hot side of outlet #2. Use a wirenut and a short piece of black wire to connect the two black wires for outlet #2 to one hot screw on outlet #2. This will be your unswitched outlet. Connect the white wire to the ...


10

A couple things here. GFCI devices differ one from the other I'd imagine that most of your GFCI receptacles are one brand/model, and then you have a few of another brand/model. Expect differences between them, and to understand any particular one, you need read its documentation: which in practicality means yank it out, obtain its model number, and look ...


2

Typically, the red light indicates that the GFCI has tripped. When you push the "test" button, it intentionally trips the GFCI so you can see that it's working normally. The light should come on, the power should go off, and the Reset button pops out ever so slightly. During normal operation, the light should be off, power on, and both buttons flush with the ...


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