New answers tagged

1

You need this cover: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Hubbell-TayMac-2-Gang-Square-Plastic-Weatherproof-Electrical-Box-Cover/1000391265 And this box: https://www.lowes.com/pd/TayMac-2-Gang-Gray-PVC-Weatherproof-New-Work-Old-Work-Standard-Switch-Outlet-Wall-Electrical-Box/4005491 And this https://www.lowes.com/pd/CANTEX-1-2-in-Combination-Connector-Schedule-40-PVC-...


2

Code rules Notice how removing the receptacle severed the hot and neutral wires, but it did not sever the ground wire. That is on purpose. Code requires receptacles in certain locations. Generally within 6' of linear wall anywhere someone might want to put a light (practically: every 12'), and on kitchen countertops within 2' of anywhere someone might put ...


5

OK, The two screws on each side of the outlet connect to the same piece of metal so, in essence,connected to the same point if the tabs between them are intact. You need to connect the three black wires together and the three white wires together. You can then get a cover to cover the junction box but the box must remain accessible, can't be covered over ...


2

Would work (provided the box fill requirements are met), but generally it is considered bad form to have unnecessary splices in hard to find or reach locations. And 50' of 12/3 is going to cost currently about $130, 50' of 12/2 is $80, 250' of 12/2 is $155. Buy the 250' roll of 12/2, hit the switch with the homerun, then leave the switch box with unswitched ...


1

Modern Code has standards for kitchen receptacles, and for good reasons. Anytime you add a kitchen countertop receptacle, it must Be 20 amps Power no loads outside the kitchen Power NO hardwired loads except a gas range and a wall clock Be actually grounded Have GFCI protection in one way or the other. No built-in appliances (e.g. dishwasher) even if they ...


1

It was simply because I didn't have the pigtail grounds connected to the ground from the supply line. They were just connected to the receptacles separately. Open ground issue fixed and all receptacles work.


3

The 15amp outlet(was not GFCI) Because most likely, it was protected by a GFCI device somewhere else. (did you know GFCI's could do that?) src Anyway, the "I'm not going to use any of those stupid blue labels" person has struck again. The Electrical Code requires that receptacle to have been marked with a "GFCI Protected" sticker, ...


0

Depending on your code Romex should be fine just be sure it has the ground with it. I hope the junction box you show is not going to be covered when you finish the room. There is a possibility as you replace this piece of cable you will find more problems with other cables, be prepared for some extra work.


3

Random bit of pipe as a damage shield TLDR: any pipe or bent metal will do, and conduit rules don't apply. If you are just using a stick of conduit here and there as a damage shield for the area that is low on the wall, then any piece of metal will do - you don't need to use conduit or even think of it as conduit. (old gas pipe? 2x4 with a slot in it?) As ...


0

If you are not, in fact, in conduit all the way, or the conduit is only serving as a short protective sleeve, you will want 12/2 NM-B and 10/3 NM-B cables for the 120V 20A and 240V 30A circuits, respectively. A cable is several wires inside an outer jacket. 12/2 has white, black, and bare ground in a cable jacket. 10/3 has white, black, red, and bare ground ...


3

Per further comments, this answer does not actually apply, as the conduit is only serving as a sleeve. You are (per your statements in the question) in conduit so you do NOT want cable, at all. You want THHN wires. If your conduit is solid metallic (EMT, typically) that is your ground, you don't need a ground wire. If it's not that, you'll need a 10Ga Green ...


1

Neither of the proposed options involves any particle board. The junction box is either installed in the wall as usual, and a cover plate installed as normal, or a box extension is installed. Or in a different situation, the box could have been installed to protrude through the cabinet. Not sure where OP is, but I believe any of those would meet code (...


6

Leave the power off, or you risk having to explain the dead quartz countertop fitters. If you just remove the faceplates, then you will be leaving bare live wires exposed in the back boxes. Anyone could touch them without realizing that they are live.


6

The outlets need to be pulled away from the wall and ideally box extenders should be installed as well. If your boxes are plastic they make rings for this purpose. For metal boxes you can use mud rings of various thickness. While you are at it, might be a good time to replace the outlets with new ones, for example swapping the color or for decora style. ...


2

If you are pulling the outlets themselves out of the box any distance, then you should leave the power off (or at least off while work is being performed). Most all outlets have side terminals/screws to connect the wiring . Once the outlets are pulled most any distance out of the box, those screws will be exposed. Workers will have any number of metal ...


0

**Key Question: Is this receptacle switched? I hope the answer is yes. If it is not, then there is something strange going on. Assuming it is switched - i.e., flip that switch on and the receptacle has power, off and no power: Hot flows through the box using the blacks Neutral flows through the box using the whites Switched Hot comes from the switch on the ...


0

Even though this is an acceptable way to wire grouped outlets (in the same box), the tab is not intended as a pass through for outlets in a string of separated outlets as it is a failure point and makes trouble shooting difficult. It used to be common to connect both feed and pass wires under the same screw but pigtailing with wire nuts is now the norm. The ...


-1

Thank you, manassehkatz. Thank you everyone. I found the open neutral in one of the outlets in the bathroom and now I'm getting good voltage readings!! I put everything back together and it all works as it should.


3

After terminating the neutrals the installer twisted/flipped the device to screw down the lives keeping the screwdriver in their dominant hand, causing the neutral wires to cross. If the bend of the wires appears deliberate, that may be because they were manipulated after the fact to help them fit inside the junction box or for a neat appearance.


5

As Ecnerwal already pointed out, it doesn't matter at all. One way to think about it is that there is an alternative way of wiring this receptacle: Use a wire nut to connect the two neutral wires together with a short white wire and connect that short wire to either screw (doesn't matter which one). Use a wire nut to connect the two hot wires together with ...


7

Note "Line" refers to a wire pair of both hot and neutral. There's no such thing as Line and Load on plain outlets They're all "Line". The screws and the brass strip they attached to are visibly, obviously directly connected. Therefore they are the same exact thing, and obviously don't have a different function in any way. Thus, they ...


12

It makes no difference, perhaps it was more convenient for the person wiring it up. Or they got it connected on Neutral, and changed their minds about which side was going to be up before wiring Hot. Regardless, it makes no difference - there is no "line and load" on a non GFCI outlet - if the tabs are unbroken, both screws on a side are the same.


6

Potential wiring faults During microwave operation, the microwave sound started to sound lower in pitch occasionally suggesting to me that the circuit is overloaded That's not how overloads work. Your circuit is probably short enough that it has <1% voltage drop at max amperage. If you overload it 200% (30A) then you have 2% voltage drop. A triple ...


3

I would: Put a 15A GFCI into the existing electric box Install an old work box a few inches from the existing box Just make sure it's in the same stud bay and you should be able to re-use the existing wire's chase-way Heck, go ahead and put in a double-gang old-work box and run two 12/2 wires to it so you can have two dedicated 20A GFCI outlets. what AWG ...


4

The question is "why". I'm going to guess ... since that's all we can really do. Useless MWBCs that were poorly conceived, poorly executed, and never useful, were combined at the panel to gain back a couple of spaces. Someone thought it would be cool to run two circuits to lots of outlets using MWBC. Just to have the capability all over the ...


9

You've got a complicated issue here. You want to use a 20A circuit (which is required for new kitchen countertop circuits, so that is 100% correct) so 12 AWG wire. But you really want to be able to run two significant (> 10A) appliances at one time. You can't do that on a 20A circuit. There are two possible solutions: MWBC = Multi-Wire Branch Circuit ...


-2

Based on wire coloring it is probably not European installation (USA maybe?) so I am not sure what local standards and codes are. Here this would be two circuits one for outlets (breaker -> outlet1 -> outlet2 -> outlet3 -> outlet4) and one for the ligts (breaker -> switch -> light1 -> light2 -> light3). Outlet circuit would be 2,5mm²(~...


6

Crazy but in a good way. Brilliant actually. Use any common 3-way switch, I don't see a problem with it. The only issue that might call for a 2-gang switch box is the need for GFCI protection on both appliances. Simply use a GFCI deadfront prior to the switch. You can't use a GFCI receptacle because that would be adding a kitchen countertop receptacle, ...


11

Looks legit, though if you haven't priced the 12/3 yet, you may wish for a way to do it all with a bigger spool of 12/2. (take power to the switch, hop from outlet to outlet, have the lights be a spur). Note that the ceiling junction boxes need to be enormous. The center box will have 10 conductors + 4 grounds (4 for the price of 1 = 1 wire count) + 2 for ...


4

Just found the setup in the photos below. This circuit was run with 3 wires + ground. White is neutral, Black and Red are on the same phase. There's a single pole 15 amps breaker feeding it. This is not a MWBC. Then they are both on the same breaker. If they are different breakers then they are an MWBC which is dangerously misfired, and should be promptly ...


1

No - other than a break in the line which is unlikely. I'm assuming the red outlets are not working. If you checked the line coming into the first non-working outlet and found no power and the outlet behind the shelves works - the problem then has to be between the last working outlet (behind the shelf) and the first non-working one. Afraid you're going to ...


6

Totally normal. We might call the red wire a "switched hot" because yes, it does provide a line/hot connection, but it is different from an ordinary continuous line/hot wire because it can be interrupted or switched. With this topology the /3 connection is required for the switch loop because code requires neutral to be present at switch locations (...


1

I looked these wierd things up. You have no wires connected to the always-hot inputs. Switched hot Hot in 1 (Switch) ] Tab (intact, unbroken connects 1&2) Neutral Hot in 2 (outlet) You are backfeeding from the switched hot terminal (red) to the hot input terminals (via the switch) which are tied to each ...


3

Retrofitting ground should suffice Run a ground wire, but not to two 8' ground rods driven into the earth. Instead run it back to the main service panel (or subpanel that the sump pump outlet is powered out of). #12 bare copper should suffice. It can follow any practicable route, and does not need to run with the circuit wires. Instead of going clear back ...


2

There are a few different ways things can be done. However, the good news is that it looks like all whites are neutral, all blacks are always hot and the one red wire is switched hot. In addition, you only have the red wire on the receptacle but not black, so it is not a split receptacle. You need to do the following: Receptacle - Change from switched hot (...


2

Remove the red wire from the switch, wirenut it to the black wires already at the switch location (not your new cable.) Now the outlet is unswitched. There are more complicated ways to do this, I advise this as the simplest. Connect your new cable White to the whites in the switch box, and your new cable Red to the switch, where you removed the old red. Cap ...


8

Short answer, no you can't legally do that. But read to the end. NEC 250.130 allows connecting a ground wire to an existing electrode, to the existing grounding electrode conductor, the ground bar in the panel where the circuit originates, to a ground wire that is part of another circuit originating in the same panel, or (yikes) to the grounded service ...


2

The 86 volts is likely phantom voltage. Only one of those wires is "neutral to the panel". The other is "neutral when connected to the other neutral via the receptacle, but floating when by itself". So that does not sound like a real problem. Ground may not be a real issue. If you have metal conduit (doubtful, but tell us if you do) then ...


2

Red wire should be switched hot. Blacks should be hot. Turn off power for the outlet at the breaker, make sure power is dead at the outlet and switch. Should be a tab connecting both hot screws on outlet. Remove tab and use a short piece of black wire(same gauge) and pigtail it to the two blacks and connect to second hot screw of the outlet. Check that the ...


12

This sounds like some improper use of ground wires. Ground connected together with neutral on a GFCI (actually, on any receptacle) is not allowed. You properly separated that ground wire and connected it to the ground screw, which solved that problem. (Note that you should also be using screws for the hot and neutral wires rather than back-stabs, but that is ...


2

Yes, that's normal. You might be thinking every outlet and light gets its own cable "home run" all the way back to the panel, but no. Power is distributed by taking it to junction box 1, then taking it onward from there to junction box 2. That's why most receptacles have 2 hot and 2 neutral wires in the box. Plain receptacles are designed to ...


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