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I get it. You see 2 screws on the side of the outlet, and figure, "only 2 wires are allowed - no branches". No, thats only a limitation of the splice method, like a 2-hole Wago. If you had a 6-hole Wago you could connect 6 wires to that splice. In particular, you are using the receptacle itself as a splice. That is a clever way of saving some space in ...


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Since you don't give many specifics I'm going to make a few assumptions: You are in the US and single means one device with two plug-ins and double means two devices with a total of four plug-ins. I'm also assuming that the two wires in the box you are sourcing your power from are black and white with a third bare copper ground. First - make sure to shut ...


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Assuming the breaker doesn’t trip and there isn’t a GFCI involved, this would generally indicate a poor, high resistance, connection somewhere in the line. Your voltmeter pulls so little current that you see the full voltage but when you connect a real load, the poor connection drops the voltage. Since you replaced the breaker and outlet, the problem must ...


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Mains guy here. Nope. To be precise, Ms. Nope. We often see people take a bog-standard NEMA 5-15 socket and intentionally miswire it so the (tall) neutral pin is actually connected to the opposing hot pole. That seems to work, when you plug in a computer via the common cord (NEMA 5-15P to IEC C13). But like many things that seem to work, it will kill ...


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If you installed a separate network jack you could then use https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07YB1JF2G/?coliid=I1Y8V2VWUUUYP6&colid=3734QTJQJNL48&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it If you don't have any other network options, you can use a PoE injector to supply voltage on the other end of the cable.


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As long as you ran a ground wire from the receptacle to the box, you should be fine providing the box is grounded. It's not uncommon for older systems with metal boxes to have the box grounds connected. Make sure they aren't just bridging neutral to ground anywhere to fool the tester. You do need to run ground wires to the box on receptacles. A ...


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First off, good for you for using the screw terminals and not using the backstabs. The capped black wire could be hooked up to the other brass screw on the outlet and the jumper clip removed. Then you'd have one outlet always hot and one switched, but it's fine the way you have it. Something to think about ... in the future when you have two or more wires ...


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No, because of the source. Generally anything you find on eBay or Amazon Marketplace is from the endless junkstream from Alibaba. These things are firestarters. There are two things you need. Must have a UL listing (or other recognized testing lab; not CE) Equipment used in mains wiring must meet basic quality standards. That is called out on ...


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WHOOP WHOOP! Call the power company RIGHT NOW and report an outage This is the classic symptom of a lost neutral. Each leg of your power is NOT 120V, yet the two poles add up to 240V, and voltage varies as load varies. 90% of the time, the lost neutral is out at the electric pole or service drop, because that is up in the weather, moving with the wind, ...


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You May Have a Lost Neutral If voltage only goes down, that is an indication of overload. But when voltage goes up in one place and down in another, that is an indication that your neutral is not working properly. Since you show 0V neutral to ground, the problem is very likely outside your home. In other words, a utility company problem. Since you have a ...


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Line is the source, and load is what is being fed from the receptacle in question. The easiest way to test this is to bare and spread all of the wires. Once they are all spread (make sure nothing is touching this is important) , kick the breaker on and place one lead of a multimeter on a black wire (hot) and touch the other to a white wire (neutral). If you ...


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I'd pick any mounting point for the receptacle that I pleased; however, I'd try to arrange it so the mounting point aligns with one of the knockouts on the panel, e.g. on its sides. It has many on its sides; for some strange reason someone framed around it, but I'd go right through it. Regardless, I'd connect with a 3/4" EMT conduit bent no more than needed;...


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You do not need to run the pipe up, then come down, there is no specific mounting height required. There are accessibility rules, and many appliances have instructions included with the appliance that prohibit using extension cords. The instructions are part of the UL listing. A Professional looking job is subjective, extra bends in the conduit will be the ...


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Conduit Any wires below a certain height need to be protected. In a typical wood studs + drywall setup, that can be running the wires inside the wall, protected with metal plates in certain locations. However, with a block wall you will run the wires outside the wall, which means running the wires through conduit. Once you are using conduit, you can run the ...


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Hot and neutral wires are working wires. Ground wire is a security/reference wire. Any connection may loosen over time. When hot wire gets loose, you'll notice it immediately - the devices behind the failure stop working properly. Same apply for the neutral wires. On the other hand when the ground wire gets loose you want to have as few devices affected as ...


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raising concerns about what other odd things were done with the wiring. You are right to have such concerns. My experience in rewiring older homes is that everyone who lived there before you was an idiot when it comes to wiring, and did crazy stuff for you to discover. As others have said, it could be a two-hots-shared-neutral circuit. You should carefully ...


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In addition to what @ThreePhaseEel said, the purpose of having two screws on each side is not so that receptacles can be wired in series. While that is allowed, the purpose is for "split receptacle" setups, where only one outlet is controlled by a switch (or each is controlled by a separate switch). This is done by breaking the metal tab that joins the two ...


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Start at the beginning: do you have a solid connection to a copper earth rod at your incoming breaker-box? The 'rest of my house reads open ground' is indicative of a problem at your main. Sounds to me like you have described a complete absence of an earth-ground for your home.


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I am glad you are finding it convenient that some devices allow themselves to also be used as splice blocks. However, that is prohibited for certain types of wires: Any and all ground wires Neutral wires on multi-wire branch circuits That is because it will cause serious problems for other (e.g. downline) loads if those connections are severed due to ...


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This is because removing a device isn't allowed to interrupt grounding connections Removing a wiring device from the circuit cannot break grounding connections, or else you are violating NEC 250.148(B): (B) Grounding Continuity. The arrangement of grounding connections shall be such that the disconnection or the removal of a receptacle, luminaire, or ...


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Fundamentally, the color codes are Ground -- green, yellow/green or bare only and ever Neutral -- white or gray (can be re-marked to be hot if in cable) Hot -- every other color including orange 240V 3-phase wild-leg phase - if exists must be orange. That is it. That is the whole of NEC color coding. Therefore, black and red are functionally equivalent....


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Slow down. The location may already be GFCI protected. Do not panic and install GFCI receptacles. This location is probably already GFCI protected, because this should have been done some time ago. Let's check that. Putting GFCI protection at a point already GFCI protected is bad, because a trip will trip all the GFCIs, and they are very difficult to ...


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Yes, kitchen receptacles near the sink need to be GFCI protected. Since you don't have GFCI at that location, there are three possibilities to consider: They are protected at the circuit breaker with a combination circuit breaker/GFCI. The downside to circuit breaker/GFCI is that resetting it is not as convenient as at point-of-use. They are protected ...


1

What you have there is a split outlet, which each socket controlled separately. By luck, your new outlet does support that. Sometimes a device has wires that are not strictly necessary for its primary function. It is being used as a splice for additional wires. This doesn't need to happen at the device. It is also common for the two wires to be ...


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Are there any switch boxes in the room? Most rooms require some sort of ability to switch a light or fixture. If not, it probably is a multi wired branch circuit, two hots sharing a neutral. Check your main panel to see if it's labeled. I'd try to trace the circuit, remove a few outlet covers and determine where the red goes. It's your house, good to know ...


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It could be a Multi-Wire Branch Circuit (MWBC). You can test this with a multimeter -- if there's 240V between the red and the black hots, it's an MWBC. These used to be common for kitchen outlets, since often heat making devices need the whole capacity of a circuit themselves, so this technique allows double the circuit capacity with just one more wire. ...


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Teething pains in new work like this, is routine enough: most buildings are built in a hurry, and they use lawful techniques which speed assembly but have lower reliability. (and one reason the builder wants to be involved in warranty work, is to track failure rates to evaluate whether these cost-saving shortcuts are actually worth it). So it's the Chinese ...


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There are 2 things I'd check. Or, hire an Electrician, regardless of Landlord, to figure out the situation. But anyway, first would be to inspect, correct and tighten any insertion of breakers and wiring at the panel, since you'll turn off the bar breaker for check #2. Second, pull the bar's outlet out to see if the tab between screws is present or not. If ...


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Try turning off the power to the bar outlet and also the power to the living room lights and outlets. Pull out the bar outlet and inspect it for loose connections, especially on the white,neutral, wire. The two breakers you turned off could be sharing the neutral and it could be loose in the bar outlet or connected by the backstabs in the outlet.


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The problem is, you have both appliances on the same circuit. Most kitchens are wired with two kitchen receptacle circuits for this very reason. Running two high-power (heat making) kitchen appliances at the same time on the same circuit is simply a non-starter. Almost every heat appliance is 1500 watts, because that is the maximum UL will certify on ...


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Use a heavy duty extension cord for one appliance to another circuit. N.B. Normally, this is inadvisable due to heating of the cord and voltage drop, but if you get one with sufficient current rating, it should be OK during the time the appliance is in use *if you are in the kitchen, paying attention. Check the current rating of the device and get an ...


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There's one caveat to be aware when you daisy-chain GFCIs: they might not all trip when tested by a tester. It's time for a story... When I bought my current house, we were showing it to my in-laws (before the purchase) and all the lights in the back half of the house were out. We were baffled, as no breakers were tripped. Towards the end of that visit, I ...


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I would find the first one on each branch circuit, keep that one and reinstall the old outlets on the others on that circuit. Most GFCI’s require power to reset so you may have already figured out the first one with the sequence to reset. A simple outlet tester with a GFCI trip button is a handy tool to have for about 10$


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There's more than one type of GFCI Aside from the ubiquitous GFCI receptacle, there are also GFCI circuit breakers GFCI standalone devices (called "deadfronts" as they look like a GFCI recep with no holes) GFCI switches (the GFCI is the switch; it's a deadfront rated for daily switching) GFCI switch-receptacle combos (a plain switch and a 1-socket GFCI ...


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It is rather unusual to have more than one receptacle outlet in a bathroom. A receptacle outlet can consist of 4 individual receptacles mounted in the same box. That means that two of the common duplex receptacles; which is two receptacles which will each except a cords plug mounted in the same yoke; mounted side by side in a two gang box is still only one ...


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