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0

I need the same help buyt with the red wire on the switch box. Red goes from switch to outlet. Want the outlet got 100% of the time and the switch controlling the lights above now. Same scenario


3

Depending on how you wired them, the problem could be in the box with outlet #9, the box with outlet #10, or in between them. Check the boxes first because that's easier, and if that doesn't fix the problem, look into replacing the wiring between 9 and 10. AFCIs can be very finicky, but you can figure out what the problem is by thorough troubleshooting. Just ...


-2

You can't do that according to NEC. You need a dedicated circuit for receptacle/s and it must be GFCI protected. You can add a GFCI receptacle (dedicated circuit) and branch of that GFCI receptacle to another receptacle. If you still want to do it ( I DO NOT recommend it), you can take your source wire and add some pigtails to it to go to other switches, and ...


3

AFCI and GFCI are both zones of protection. They are not receptacles, though they are sold as a "combo device" including that function and a receptacle. Those protect their own sockets obviously, and they can protect a downline. With AFCI, pretty much the entire point is protecting the downline wiring in the walls. There's very little point ...


6

They protect from different things. AFCIs are primarily about preventing fires started by electrical arcs. They were (IMHO) not ready for prime time when they first hit the market, I think they have gotten better (certainly fewer "my vacuum won't run on this circuit" stories these days. But not zero, I see on a quick look.) If you happen to be in a ...


3

Read our FAQ for receptacle/switch replacements. So I gather you prefer using receptacle A to plug in your light. Here came an error in logic: since you only want a split receptacle at A, you only broke off the tab there. You missed the fact that receptacles B and F also had broken-off tabs. By wiring it up as you found it but not breaking off the tabs, ...


4

Simplest option is that outlet F was also half-hot/half-switched and you were not aware of that, so breaking its tab (or isolating that red wire from the outlet and insulating it, if you don't want it half-switched) might fix your problem. I would guess that you missed that in the original wiring, or it would work as expected. Connections at B look like a ...


1

Female to male PVC connector? source Maybe this? Thread wires thru, screw female part onto what you have coming out of the wall and there is your protruding threaded male part with wires protruding. I invariably get the wrong one first time so bring your new box to the hardware store to make sure it will attach.


2

You're making it harder than it is. Hooking up a GFCI is a two-step process In step 1, you shut off power and cap off all wires except the wires you think are supply/source. You attach only those wires to only the "Line" terminals of the GFCI. Then, you make everything safe for power-up, and then power up and thoroughly test the GFCI. Make sure &...


2

You can if you’re willing to make the receptacle always hot, in which case you can repurpose the white wire to the switch box as a neutral. Basically, after turning off the power, you remove the switch first. Then, you reconnect the receptacle with your usual middle-of-the-run receptacle wiring, white to silver, black to brass, though you may have to replace ...


0

Apparently, the feed goes to the switch first, then to the lights and finally to the receptacle. If you’re willing to go with wireless switching, you can wire a receiver to each light, connecting the wires according to instructions. (Be careful, though, since some wireless receivers use European wire colors, where the neutral color is blue rather than white.)...


1

The easiest way to do this is to disconnect the red and black wire from the switch and wire nut them together. Use a blank cover to cover the switch box. This allows you to go back to switched outlets in the future if you want. Make sure there will still be a light controlled by a switch by the door. You can get more involved and disconnect the red wire from ...


38

Since the wire is 14/2, the breaker feeding it must be 15A. Someone apparently changed that to a 20A breaker (presumably because they were sick of constant breaker trips every time they attempted to use two heat appliances at once). Since that was done, you have the sense of "hey, do it even more". That "end justifies the means" POV ...


1

Three-Way Switches You have standard toggle switches. You need three-way switches. A standard switches on/off. A three-way switch switches one common wire to alternate between two other traveler wires. Pretty much any standard toggle switch can be replaced with a 3-way switch - regular, Decora, etc. The most important thing is running 14/3 (or 12/3 on a 20A ...


2

The evidence gleaned from your question and the conversation in comments strongly suggests that the shorting bar between the top and bottom half of a "partial switched outlet" has not been removed. If it has been already removed from the outlet that you have open then there is a strong possibility that there is another switched outlet on that ...


0

The silver colored screws, on one side, are where the neutral conductor goes. The gold colored screws, on the other side, are where the hot wires land. By default, the upper and lower screws do not correspond to the upper and lower half of the outlet. In order to separate the upper and lower halves, there should be a small metal tab between the gold screws ...


2

Thanks to @ThreePhaseEel I dare say the problem is fixed. Asking the right question - in this case "what make/model are your circuit breakers" is what led to the answer - a standard breaker was inappropriate for such a large inductive load. After replacing it with a "high magnetic" breaker it hasn't tripped once. I did not know such ...


7

I'm going to be plugging in a 14000 BTU portable air conditioner and it just seems like a good idea to have a 20A outlet to reduce heating in the outlet, even if the circuit is rated only for 15A. That won't have any effect. The internals of both 15A and 20A outlets are made of exactly the same stuff. That's due to a UL requirement that 15A receps must be ...


4

No 20A receptacle on a 15A circuit allowed. 15A receptacles can safely take a 20A current, so in terms of heat development in the outlet or receptacle, it's the same anyway.


1

Another option is to just stick a decora adapter plate in front of the standard receptacle and buy a double decora wall plate. This is a much more expensive route than Three-Phase's answer, but it would solve the problem and potentially make things look uniform. Alternatively you could buy a decora receptacle and go double decora as well.


3

You said down stream: if this receptacle further away from the panel than the original I would suspect a bad connection in the wiring or this receptacle is loose creating a voltage drop. With reduced voltage the amperage to start the motor will be higher and that could be why the breaker trips, now and did not in the original location. Yes your motor can ...


1

Since the problematic outlet is closer to the breaker (""previous compressor's location was downstream") the resistance of the wire to the far outlet is helping limit the start-up current. This prevented the tripping in the former location. Sometimes using an extension cable accomplishes the same benefit, which you could use as a temporary ...


45

What you want is a decorator/duplex combination wall plate What you're after is a 2-gang wall plate with a decorator (Decora) opening on the left and a standard duplex opening on the right, like so: You should have no trouble finding one of these at the local big-box store.


2

It sounds like at one time this was a 240v circuit but it’s not now and you need a proper neutral. Get some white or gray paint, or tape and coat both ends of the old cloth braid. In the panel move the wire from the breaker to the ground buss (if a newer panel and the grounds and neutrals are separated to the white or grounded buss). Then use the neutral at ...


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