New answers tagged

1

So long as all the outlets are in the garage, you meet the language of the code. The intent of the single outlet (marked freezer) would have been to minimize the possibility of the freezer being taken out by some other load tripping the circuit. You don't need to follow that intent, particularly if you are not also using it for a freezer.


0

I think you might be reading something old. The 2002 through 2017 NECs that I have here do not say it in that way, they don't have the part about having no other outlets. That phrase IS there for Laundry areas, but not in the part about garages in general.


2

Easy one. Here are the secrets: The circuit involves a switch loop which uses /2 cable (black-white). Switch loops don't have neutrals. If white is not used as a neutral, it must be used for the always-hot, not the switched-hot (so it reliably reads hot when touched with a voltage tester). So... 1 white among blacks tells us a switch loop is involved, and ...


0

First, you need to be absolutely sure here or poof breaker pop. Do you have a Volt Meter? You don't have before pictures, do you? I'm trying to understand the photos you've provided. In the top photo, there are just two wires in the pigtail- right? A pair of black/hot? Also in the top photo is a pair of blacks and a single white going to another pigtail, ...


0

Is this outlet connected to a GFCI outlet? If so, the GFCI may have tripped during your experimentation, effectively disconnecting these wires from power.


0

This may be a very simple fix. It turns out the similar problem I described was all due to low batteries in a Firestick remote. Apparently when the batteries get low in those, and possibly other types of IR remotes, it can send out spurious IR signals that get received by the appliances. Dumb design flaw in the remote. It should probably just have a ...


1

Dandavis has the right general idea for when you can use a high current to get a significant voltage drop on your cables. This voltage drop will be significant enough when compared with the nominal mains voltage to be distinguishable from socket to socket. For lighting circuits, you have much less voltage drop. When measuring each socket, your meter ...


13

To figure out the order of items on a circuit: (warning, tedious and laborious, but accurate) First, sort out which items are on the circuit - i.e. what turns off/on with the breaker. Turn the breaker off. Pick any device on the circuit, open it up. If there's only one cable coming into the box, close it up again, noting that it's an end. If there are two or ...


8

I think there's a way along a single branch to map out what's closest to the breaker and what's closest to the end of the line. It's somewhat dependent on wiring quality, having it consistent along the branch under test. You need a voltmeter and a 1500W space heater. Unplug everything you know about from the branch. measure +note the voltage at each outlet ...


3

I have worked on older homes that all the lights in the entire home were on the same circuit (plus a few receptacles). The requirement for residential pre 2021 is 1ea 15a circuit per 600 sf or 1ea 20 amp circuit for 800 sf (I haven’t looked it up to see if that has changed I doubt it because residential is still 3va per sf on the lighting calculations where ...


11

Remove the crimp connector and use a wire nut to attach a new 6" piece of wire then connect to the screw terminal on your device.


2

As I suspect, these are on separate circuits. Code requires the two breakers have a handle-tie so they must be shut off together - that is because there was two separate circuits on the same yoke (receptacle, switch, etc). If that was a Code violation, we'll be eliminating that. Here, "which wires are in which cables" matter. You previously had ...


2

The following assumes that the metal tab was broken on at least the hot side of original outlet, completely isolating the top and bottom. The neutral side may or may not have been isolated. On the new outlet, connect black wire 2 on the right side and white wire 2 on the left. These are the always-on hot and corresponding neutral. Top or bottom doesn’t ...


2

A surface mount box can be attached to the exterior siding (what is the siding?) In some cases I like to cut the siding an inset the box and screw it to the sheeting OR cut through the sheeting and make the box flush mount (old work box could be used in this case). Since you have the UF a surface mount is fine I usually use 2 screw clamps, cheaper than a CGB ...


0

Underwriter's Laboratories (UL) is a testing lab who also writes the standards for what is allowed in the US market and those who rely on UL's standard making. UL or competitor labs such as CSA, ETL etc. will not give their mark of quality to products which are not safe. Of course for business and treaty reasons, direct mail (including via Amazon dropshop ...


2

Yes, it will work ok. because only an ungrounded plug can be used backwards, and the wide pin stil goes into the wide slot etc. Others have commented that this layout is non standard and it's unlikely that the device has been blessed by UL.


0

Don't use an extender! Assuming an extender is some sort of little 3-to-1 (or similar) gadget to just "make extra outlets", those are not normally recommended for (a) permanent use, (b) hidden use or (c) high power use. Permanent Use - They get forgotten and they are an extra point of failure since they are just "hanging around" so they ...


0

New answer, new approach: If you want to avoid the expense of installing an outlet properly, an unsafe botch that would be vastly preferable to the one you propose would be to just run an extension cord from the nearest existing outlet, wherever that may be, to the location of the camera, with appropriate fasteners to run the cable along the wall or ...


0

You do not have any issue with the capacity of the existing circuit to power this device. Your issue is how to create the connectivity safely. The solution you describe with DIY connections at both ends of a 230V wire, one end soldered(??) onto a cheap plastic PSU in place of its plug and the other end somehow connected to an existing outdoor lamp, you don'...


1

This has great potential to become a hokey fix-up DIY bodge, but try not to be tempted into cutting all the corners. BTW, you said it's "only pulling 24v" which is incorrect. It's pulling 240v, but only 0.2A That's actually less than half the power consumed by a 60w light bulb, so even if your ring is running a chandelier in the hall too, it's ...


4

You need a weatherproof 4/O to single-gang plate with in-use cover:


1

The right way to do this: Add a blank cover on that box and use a close nipple to add another rectangular outlet box below it. Then in that rectanglar box, install a GFCI receptacle (unless this is fed from a GFCI circuit breaker already). Then you can get what's called an "in-use" weatherproof cover for the rectangular box. In-use covers have a ...


5

I never found the answer to the specific question "what part of the code", but I did speak with some electricians who indicated that if the kiln were permanently installed it would be considered a 'continuous load', similar to a 'heating appliance' like a stove or a furnace. However, my kiln is on wheels which I use to roll it into the corner when ...


6

Aside from what else is going on, this is a goobed up mess. The #1 problem is that a junction box can't just have a hole bashed in it by smashing a rock against it. The cable entering it needs to have a proper cable clamp, which means the box needs a proper knockout. The cable is #4 SE cable, and that cable can do 2 interesting things: First, that bare wire ...


4

That cable appears to be type SE cable, and so it would be allowed by the exception to NEC 250.140 to replace the 30A receptacle with a 3-wire NEMA 10-50R. Below is the code section you can read. It seems to me your existing installation fits the conditions, even condition (3) about the uninsulated cable. It would be better to upgrade to a 4-wire, but not ...


12

It appears to me that this cable has two insulated conductors for the two hot legs plus an uninsulated conductor to be used as a ground, i.e., it does not have a third insulated cable to be used as a neutral. The cable is wired to the receptacle using the uninsulated conductor as a neutral. This is not allowed by code. This cable can legally supply 240 V, ...


10

Go for it, for now at least... You appear to have at least 6AWG if not 4AWG aluminum present there, so you will have no trouble with a full-sized range circuit using the existing 40A breaker and a NEMA 10-50R receptacle. Since this is aluminum wire, though, you'll need a Cu/Al rated receptacle, and also to make sure you use anti-oxidant grease on the ...


3

You are right to be skeptical. The components in your circuit are the breaker, the outlet, and the wiring in between, which is the unknown in this case. If the wire is the right gauge (8 I think), it's condition is good and has been run correctly you could change the outlet, if it's too small a gauge you could overload the wiring.


3

Connect the wires as they were on the outlet (using wirenuts, or another approved connector type if preferred) and use a blank junction box cover over the box (you must leave the junction box cover accessible.)


22

Easy. Just get a round to single gang adapter like this: Amazon even suggests this is bought together with an in-use cover and GFCI, so you are clearly not the only one with this problem. If you don't have GFCI on this circuit, you should add it. Even with an in-use cover, that would be better done inside (breaker panel or an earlier receptacle in the ...


1

Can't do that! The reason is keying The whole point of having different receptacles for different voltages is to provide interlocking so the firestarting thing does not happen. And it may seem all clever to do this while you're the only person tending the machine. But what's your sunset plan for this? How do you plan to assure nobody else does something ...


5

Use a 12V/1A enclosed chassis mount (or DIN rail mount, for that matter) supply Your problem here is that you are trying to apply a "wall wart" in an application (inside a control panel of some flavor) where you'd be provisioning a receptacle solely for the wall-wart's use. This is a waste of a receptacle, and also poses NEMA 5/NEMA 6 confusion ...


1

Putting a 120V receptacle on a 240V circuit = future guy’s fried 120V appliance when he plugs it in without the knowledge that you have that it’s actually a 240V circuit with the wrong outlet type on it. You need at least a NEMA 6-15R or 6-20R (looks like standard 120V outlets, except the blades are sideways so you can’t plug in 120V appliances.


49

That is well within ANSI C84.1 North American Utlity Standards.


11

You will be fine with that. The power company usually delivers 5% +or - the normal 120/240 residential voltage. Your meter also has a tolerance of up to 3%.


19

240 V is the "nominal" reading. You'll usually get ±10% voltage from the utility lines, and your appliances are designed to accommodate that variation.


2

t's the slot in the head of the plate screw that makes unscrewing the screws a hassle! I always curse slot headed screws when I encounter them! The trick to use that makes the screws unscrew with no problems is to clean out the slot of the screw head. Using a utility knife slice through the dried paint that is clogging the slot. It may take a couple of ...


0

"seems straightforward" except GFCIs wire completely differently from plain receps. First, recognize the code violations here: a neutral-ground bootleg jumper, and b) 2 white wires on the same screw. Here's how to hook up a GFCI recep. Leave the "For Wizards Only" warning tape on the "Load" screws. With power off... Take one ...


1

The good news is that a properly installed GFCI effectively protects you not only from the ground faults that it is designed for, but also makes things so that the key use of the ground wire - to provide an alternate path for return current should there be certain types of failures in a device - will effectively be unnecessary because those same faults will ...


2

No way, and no reason, to do it. A proper 15A breaker for most panels is 5 bucks. The whole point of breakers is protecting wires and equipment. A 70A breaker is simply too big to provide any protection to 15A and 20A circuits. Stranded wire is NOT for splitting off. It's for flexibility (solid #6 would simply be too stiff). You can't modify equipment or ...


0

You can't pull from the microwave circuit under Code, so use the range hood circuit instead Your 1700W microwave is far in excess of the 50% limit set by NEC 210.23(B)(2) on the total wattage of fixed appliances connected to branch circuits that also have lighting and/or general-use receptacles on them: (2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place. The total ...


2

Short answer, because there are a ton of details. A 70A breaker does not connect directly to 15A or 20A receptacles (the "standard outlets"). There are basically two possibilities: Subpanel A 70A breaker can be connected, with appropriate wire, to a subpanel. A subpanel typically has a bunch of breakers, which can include 15A or 20A breakers that ...


3

You need to remove the tab between the brass screws on the outlet. This will separate the two hot feeds.


31

TL;DR Remove the tab on the hot (red/black) side "A/B" plus the symptoms sounds like you have a Multi Wire Branch Circuit or MWBC. With an MWBC, you can have the top receptacle's hot on one part of the circuit and the bottom receptacle's hot on the other part of the circuit. Each receptacle is then 120V hot-to-neutral but the two hots are 240V ...


0

The height location of your entertainment system power outlets is not regulated by code with the exception if they are above 5-1/2’ they do not count to the required receptacles in the room. If you want them located in some fancy base board molding they can be there up to 5-1/2’ or height in between. If higher additional receptacles may be needed depending ...


1

Anytime you have a metal box, you ground the metal box FIRST. When the receptacle's yoke has hard-flush metal-metal contact with the junction box cover, and the cover has hard-flush bare metal-metal contact with the junction box, then it picks up grounding that way. There are other ways as well. However, you NEVER connect the ground wire to the receptacle ...


2

Metal boxes must be always be grounded. For a surface mounted metal device box NEC 250.146(A) allows omitting the jumper to the device if the yoke mounts flush and at least one paper washer is removed or omitting the jumper if using a cover mounted receptacle if the cover and box are "listed as providing a satisfactory ground...". Really the Code ...


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