New answers tagged

4

The first thing you do is roll it all back to status quo ante with the original switches and get it back where it works 100%. Now you'll see a black wire that is split to go to at least 2 switches. (it may pogo from switch to switch). We're not worried about that one for now, but its function is always-hot. We'll be spending most of our time with the ...


1

Even more simple. Test the wires with the switch in the off position. It looks like the switch you are trying to replace is on.


0

If the switch shown is the one you want to hook up, then you'll need to determine the always hot wire and attach it to the wire from the other switch and then to your new switch. Then the remaining wire goes to the other terminal on your new switch. Remember to turn off the power before doing any work.


4

You will never get 100% out of a dimmer, but 70 sounds low. Do you have a trueRMS multimeter or a cheapo unit? A non-RMS one could be mis-sampling the AC voltage given the irregular shape of the resulting AC waveform, which can give an off reading. I would also check again with a load (bulb) in-place. You might not have enough current to get the triac (the ...


2

If the dimmer in is a dimmed down position, then 70 Volts would be appropriate. Why are you turning on the power before totally finishing the job? People get hurt with loose hot wires.


1

I figured it out finally after trying different bulbs. I finally registered the smart switch and downloaded the Smart Lights app. I was playing with the settings and when I changed the phase from “forward” to “reverse,” the dimmer function started working (see photo below). I wish Legrand would have that somewhere in a FAQ but it’s website is not useful at ...


0

Assuming you're located somwewhere where 230V lighting circuits are common Is says that it's compatible with LED lights that have a power factor of 0.8 or better and nor more than 80w total. Your load is less than 80W so that's a good start, but you'll need to check the power factor of your LED lamps to confirm its suitability. power factor doesn't add, it ...


2

You'll want a LED compatible, multi-way capable dimmer In your case, you'll want a dimmer that's compatible with dimming Edison-base LED replacements, and also supports multi-way operation. This is not something you want to cheap out on, or order from Amazon, by the way; your local home improvement/hardware store or electrical supply house should stock at ...


1

Note that you only use one dimming method. Dimming methods do not stack. So it sounds like the Home Depot (why shop there?) 3-way dimmers are expensive. It’s just as well; those are going to be triac dimmers. Which use the “modify the AC power” technique discussed above by mana’. Triac dimmers simply turn the AC power on or off prematurely; that is the ...


1

The dimmable LED’s that I have in my plant can not have the main voltage altered those 2 extra leads are for dimming , I use full power / ~ 10% for night lighting I wire all the extra 2 wire dimmer controls into a control relay that connects those 2 leads and my light level is dimmed , some use a potentiometer to vary the voltage at the 2 leads but the ...


2

There are at least 4 different ways to dim mains AC powered lights (i.e., anything from 110V - 480V): Modification of the mains power fed to the lights This is what typical residential applications use. It is cheap because of mass production (i.e., almost any home or office can use it) and easy because it generally involves "switch replacement" ...


Top 50 recent answers are included