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LED flickers, because it is a light emitting diode (a solid state lamp). The Lamp will only light when its power cycle is "on". A dimmer in essence, SLOWS DOWN THE CYCLE TIME, therefore slowing down the time frame in which a cycle is repeated. So, the lamp appears to flicker, because it is turning ON and OFF!


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I'll tell you a secret: they flicker all the time You just don't notice it, because the higher the power, the longer they stay ON and quicker switch on/off. As you dim down them, their flickering becomes more even and noticeable. What about randomness ? Well, it flickers randomly to minimize harmonics disturbance. Wait, what's that ? It's topic for another ...


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Electronic devices like LED compatible dimmers that chop up the AC power into tiny chunks tend to generate electronic noise that consists of harmonics of the line frequency but at very high frequencies. These signals will bounce around between other devices nearby through the wiring. This can cause interactions between those devices which would be more ...


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Check that your LED bulbs are compatible with dimmers, and check that your dimmers are compatible with LEDs. If their respective packages don't say, then they probably aren't compatible and you will have problems. Even if everything claims to be compatible, you still might have issues. In that case, the best you can do is experiment with different brands ...


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LEDs on AC Power Don't Like to be Dimmed. Period. (LEDs on DC can actually be dimmed quite easily - just look at an older battery powered LED device (like handheld computer games from the 1980s) and you can see the LEDs dim when the battery is low.) But most AC powered LED lights - whether complete fixtures or Edison bulb incandescent replacements - have a ...


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The specifications of the LED lights you have say they will dim down to 10% without any flicker or buzzing. Some lights don't go down that far, and some will go even further. Based on the manual for your dimmer switch, there is an adjustment to change the low end of the dimming range: I would assume the switch would be factory set to work with most lights,...


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How about we start by marking some wires with colored tape. Wires that are supposed to be hot all the time get marked black. Wires associated with the fan hot (that we switch) get red. Wires associated with the lamp hot (that is dimmed) get blue. Mark the appropriate hot wires amongst those five cables. On the dimmer, you mark the supply wire black (...


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To properly dim an LED, you need the following info: What type of LED you're trying to dim (integrated IC or 'bare') What type of dimmer you need to use What type of controller you need/want LED strip (or integrated driver IC) LED strips usually have a driver built-in and operate at 12 or 24V. They are easily powered by a regular (Constant Voltage) power ...


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Since your product has actually cleared all the EU safety standards and then some (TUV follows UL's standards generally), I recommend keeping your safe product all-safe. That precludes using the cheap Asian junkstream coming out of Alibaba and blasting onto AliExpress, eBay, Amazon, banggood and other turdmeister outlets. You want drivers which either ...


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Buzzing is usually because something is physically loose inside, and is being vibrated by the electro-magnetic force from the internal wires. This gets worse with dimming, because triac dimmers make a very bizarre waveform that makes insane amounts of harmonic distortion, and it may resonate better at 180 or 300Hz or 420Hz than 60Hz. You could crack it open ...


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I do believe it is wired backwards. That would never be tolerable in a DC (direct-current) system. However, AC reverses 100 times a second (giving 50 full cycles per second). A funny side-effect of that is that some things don't care about being back-fed, e.g. breakers. If your dimmers are one of those, then you got lucky. However, I would expect that ...


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Trivial, but it won't work as you'd like with common gear You can have a dimmer controlling some number of lights. You can also have a switch interrupting each individual light (at its simplest: a "pull cord" on each fixture). The switch needs to be downstream of the dimmer (between the dimmer and light). It should switch the hot wire only (unless you are ...


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If the three single switches are in the same 3-gang box, you can combine them into one dimmer switch. Turn off the power. Remove the three switch feeds from the hot leg and connect the hot leg to the dimmer with the appropriate connectors.. Remove the three load wires from the switches and connect them to the load wire of the dimmer. Connect ground wire, if ...


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