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3

Soo.. maybe the question, or at least the remaining portion of it, is this: "how does current flow between two hots, ie when there's no neutral connection?" To understand the reason, consider the source of the power. It comes from a transformer, which is basically just a coil of wire. There's something special about how utility transformers are ...


4

Confusion from failure to use marking tape Yeah, I know. Marking wires with electrical tape to indicate function seems like such a needless chore. "I only need to understand it right now. I will never be in here later troubleshooting!" This of course ends up not working 1/4 as well as expected. Some of the people who are marking-hostile write ...


1

The white is allowed to be used as a hot in specific conditions such as shown in the diagram they supplied. Here is the code reference that allows it: NEC 200.7 Use of insulation of a white or gray color...(C) Circuits of 50 volts or more. The use of insulation that is white or gray.. for other than grounded circuit conductor..only ...(1) if part of a cable ...


2

You are confusing color with function. White is not Neutral. White is a color found in cables; the function of the wire can vary, in a cable. At least in the US Market, /2 cables have black, white and ground (bare or green) /3 cables have black, white, red and ground. For a true 240V load (no 120V components) there is no need for neutral. For those loads, a /...


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TL;DR: Your tankless heater is a 240V "only" circuit and the instructions assume cable. There are 3 types of circuits and 2 kinds of wiring methods in typical US residential construction: Circuit Types 120V This generally includes lighting (though modern LED lighting can often handle 240V just fine), "regular" receptacles around the home ...


1

White is a color and on 240 you have no neutral so the white is used as a hot this is code compliant fro 240v only loads if there was 120v in the heater it would require a x-3 with ground wire. Switch loops also allow the hot to be on the white. White is a color and usually used for neutral but not always and almost never marked or reidentified in this case. ...


1

If your 15A & 20A circuits are 120V, you are not fully loaded on a 30A 240V feed IF they are on "opposite legs" - USA/Canada power is 120/240V and a 30A 240V feed can run 60A of 120V circuits fully loaded without tripping. Half the 120V circuits are on one hot "leg" and the other half are on the other hot "leg" and there is ...


1

Whoever was fidding in the panel last really didn't know what they were doingscrewing up Whoever was last doing electrical work on this panel probably shouldn't be invited to return for more, given what they managed to screw up with your shop circuit. Your GE panel, instead of using tandem breakers (2 breaker mechanisms in a single pole frame) for "...


2

Your electrician must have moved breakers around so that the "bad" ones are now on the same phase. 240 Volt circuits must be on opposite phases. When you run down one side of the panel, alternate breakers are on opposite phases so any 240V are usually placed on adjacent breakers and Ta Da you get it right. However, all your breakers except the four ...


3

This panel has 20 spaces/40 circuits. The spaces alternate (by row) between the 2 hot legs. The "A" and "B" within each space are on the same leg. The functioning 240V circuit is on 12B + 14A. The dead 240V circuit is on 16A + 16B. All the voltage readings you've made and the pictures match. The simple solution, is to swap 14B and 16B. ...


4

Hmmm. Are the working and non-working outlets on different circuits? If so, it sounds like your alleged "electrician" put the 2 hot wires for the non-working outlet on the same phase. If so, I'd have a different qualified electrician check out his other work. To fix this, if the non-working outlet hots are on the same phase, you need to move one ...


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