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The sales info I looked at showed it with a 3 wire plug so it should be ok. Some electronic controlled devices require a neutral and then a 4 wire would be needed but it looks to be straight 240 so your plan should work. As far as GFCI code specifies 15 & 20 amp circuits so it would not be required but gfci’s around liquid are a good idea.


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Yes, this is a lost neutral or ground. Keep in mind that if this is a NEMA 10 type receptacle, hot-hot-neutral (no ground), then a lost neutral is a rather dangerous situation. Such connections typically bond neutral to the chassis on the assumption that the neutral wire rarely fails, and bootlegging ground in this way is less unsafe than having no ground....


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The third wire is not connected, either broken somewhere along its path or there's a missing connection in one of the junction box leading to the outlet. If there's multiple connection boxes from the panel to the outlet, you can test at each to figure where the problem is. Either a nut came loose somewhere or a wire was cut/torn. The question doesn't make ...


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You'll have to pull the box out and rearrange things While it sounds like you have all the correct wires available to extend this on as a four-wire connection to your new range location, your last installer forgot the clamp for connecting the cable to the box, and also made the ground connection outside the box, which isn't right either. So, you'll have to ...


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https://www.amazon.com/Intermatic-SW15MK-15-Minute-Spring-Wound/dp/B00LBHBPKK We use Intermatic switches, which withstand decades of customer abuse. Not as cool, but reliable and effective


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You need a 4-wire range connection. Since this is a remodel, you must upgrade this circuit to a 4-wire connection. That "NEMA 10-50" 3-wire connection is obsolete, illegal and dangerous. If there is metal conduit, or a separate ground wire hidden back there, then you have the necessary grounds present, and extending is a possibility. Otherwise, forget ...


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You should splice it in a box and extend to floor level behind range. Pay special attention to NEC 210.50(C) Appliance Receptacle Outlets. Appliance Receptacle Outlets...shall be installed within 1.8m (6 ft) of the intended location of the appliance. Also check with the Installation Instructions of the range to see if it specifies receptacle location or ...


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What you want is possible, but requires an extra box While button-type (electronic) countdown timers that can switch 240V directly aren't a thing due to the limited market they would have; this is still possible provided neutral is available to the timer and you are OK with an extra box hanging around. In particular, what you can do is use a suitable timer ...


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With the limited info provided I will guess that it is a 240v heater as the other one was but this time they only used a single pole thermostat to control the power, it works the negative here is that there will always be a hot conductor in the baseboard unless the breaker is turned off, this used to be quite common, or was used with multiple heaters in 1 ...


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Mutually Incompatible Certification Schemes The primary problem with what you describe (installing a foreign-standards receptacle into a North American electrical system) is while foreign receptacles of reputable make (vs. some Cheese-pipeline special) are going to have a third-party certification, that certification is going to stem from a different ...


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There is no listing for non-standard receptacles, so at a basic level, it would require "examination" by the AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction) in your area under NEC Article 90.7 to make sure it doesn't violate the basic "suitable for use" rules in Article 110.3. You might find an AHJ who will accept the IEC certifications as adequate, you might not, there ...


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