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34

Call the power company and report an outage You lost a phase. (one of the two hot wires from the service). I can tell, because if someone had been monkeying around in the service panel just prior to the water heater breaking, you would have mentioned that, yes? I hope no one is making a monkey out of me! What happened is, when the phase was lost, the water ...


4

A common reason for this problem is 1/2-size breakers used incorrectly. Normally a panel has alternating legs with each pair (left/right) first on one leg, next row on the other leg, next row back to the first leg. If you install 1/2-size breakers ("duplex", "double stuff", "tandem") then they share the same leg because they are ...


3

It means at both points you are measuring the same leg. This can happen when both leads are on the same leg in the panel or if one hot leg is connected to the heater you can see the full voltage of the hot connection through the heater. There could be many causes for one leg to be hot and the other open; a thermostat off or failed, failed breaker connection, ...


14

It means that the hots are on the same phase. They need to be on opposite phases for your heater to work. Make sure that both hots are fed from a 2 phase breaker in your panel And not a narrow double stuff breaker..


1

There are scenarios where you can put 120 and 240v receptacles on the same multiwire branch circuit, but the catch here is that it is not Code legal to put a 15 or 20A receptacle on a 30A circuit. Imagine a 120v/1500w dryer element goes short drawing triple the current putting out triple the heat. 4500w/120v = 37.5A. Looking at a breaker trip curve a 20A ...


3

I'd just add an extra outlet to the 120V circuit that's already required in the laundry area Instead of jumping thru hoops to try to wedge a subpanel into the laundry area (which is what you'd have to do to make your proposal Code-legal), I'd simply run a short length of Wiremold from the existing washing machine outlet to a surface box behind the dryer and ...


0

The green wire with the yellow stripe is ground, which will connect to the green or bare wire. The brown and blue wires are the hots, which will connect to the black and the red, or the black and the white of the red is not available. Which is which between the brown and the blue does not matter.


4

Just wire it up like a table saw. Hot-Hot-Ground. Never use the obsolete and dangerous NEMA 10 connector. Whether you need neutral or not, a 4-wire NEMA 14 connector is always OK, and provides the most versatile socket (it will support 120/240V loads also). If you don't need neutral, a NEMA 6 connector is just right. You can use black-white cable, and re-...


0

This will be a brief answer; I'm sure others could be more complete. The short answer is yes only if the existing wiring is a multiconductor cable such as NM and not individual wires like THHN in conduit. However, it has to be done carefully. You have to change to a normal 15 or 20 A breaker for your typical 120 V receptacle or it wont be protected from ...


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