13

A prong by itself cannot make a complete circuit. Even if it did, it would immediately trip your circuit breaker and likely damage the receptacle (as in it would visibly spark/arc). It doesn't sound they they're on the surface either, or they would be a shock hazard. If I were you, and you feel confident enough to turn the power off, you could replace it ...


11

I'm assuming US plugs here. No, broken prongs will not cause an increase in your electrical bill. In order for electricity to be used and appear on your bill electricity must move from one side of the top row to the other side of the top row in a circuit, through an electrical device of some kind. If you jumped directly from one side to the other with a wire ...


10

The problematic receptacle Use of a NEMA 10 family receptacle is illegal today. It was always illegal with that cable type, which is a "/2 + ground" type, for reasons I go into in comments on George Anderson's answer. Use of SE cable was legal, but only to help dealers use up their remaining stocks. So the NEMA 10 must go; you don't have the right cable ...


9

It's a plug that accepts Hubbell's 1906 tandem and 1912(?) parallel plugs. Both were rated for a maximum of 250v, but usually wired for 120. Similar rating to Edison 1" (now called E26), most are rated for up to 250v, but we commonly see them used only for 120v.


8

Maybe used for a welder? Kiln? The worst thing right now is the breaker "protecting" the circuit. It's double what it should be. 10ga wire in cable is rated at 30 amps! Not 60!!! The wiring on your outlet is OK, just dated. It's fine for a 240v only appliance: 2 hots and a ground. Not code legal anymore, but commonly done for clothes dryers in the ...


4

You're pretty close to color-coded here, so I'd get some colored tape and mark stuff up. The cluster of 4 hots on the wire-nut is all always-hot. It comes from supply, goes onward to some other outlet, and then there are two pigtails going to the 2 switches. I like black for always-hot, but it's not mandatory. I would change that red pigtail out for ...


4

You can definitely plug your powerline adapter into your in wall adapter. It might take up more than one space on the in wall adapter thought preventing you from being able to use an outlet. check the sizes before you buy.


3

It's very unlikely the wiring in the walls was damaged. Usually what happens is a weak connection gets fried by the short circuit. As many others have mentioned previously here, these failures are often the result of the infamous "back stab" outlets. You might have to take out several of them (WITH THE POWER OFF) and inspect for loose connections or ...


3

What I like to do is to buy a power-strip in the foreign country, then cut of its cord and replace it with a sturdy US-purchased plug. That way you don't have to modify your house or your appliances, but also don't have to use those cheap travel adapters. If you do still want to modify your house it probably will not be as easy as when you upgrade an ...


3

You're going to run a new 14/2 (plus ground) cable* down from the light and connect it to the same points as your current light's cable: The white wire goes to the bundle of whites The black wire goes to the screw on the switch that has the black wire now The bare ground connects to the ground bundle It looks like that switch can accept multiple wires ...


2

I'm a bit puzzled at the "dryer-type outlet" and how precise you're being on that language. There are 2 dimensions here: the type of outlet, and the ampacity. Typewise: a true 3-prong dryer outlet, NEMA 10, is outlawed. It especially should not be used with the neutral (L-shape) being abused as ground. Neutral is not ground. A NEMA 6 is appropriate, ...


2

Can you put more than 1 240v receptacle on a circuit , YES. Can you splice #8 wires in a 4x4 2” deep box with a 30 amp receptacle. The box fill in this case would allow it. Box fill explained #8 wire is 3 cu in , you did not say if you had straight 240 with ground or + a neutral. I count a total of 7 conductors only count the ground 1 time. A clamp ...


2

In my experience, and as per the usual instructions - they perform worse, or not at all plugged into a multisocket. You want it directly in the wall, and if losing a socket is an issue, there's passthrough versions. - for example, netgear explicitly suggests you not do this In some cases - using a passthrough might also help filter noise from any device or ...


2

I searched for this and couldn't find a NEMA code for this outlet (no surprise there!). But in my research it appears that this has been around for a long time, terrible idea as it was. Attached is a pic of a similar outlet that is obviously quite old. There are actually 3 of them with the same configuration in the pic. I would rather have made this a ...


2

You had a pretty accurate knowledge of what was wrong with the outlet and George summed it up nicely. One thought to make it safe, and usable, would be to remove the outlet and add a regular metal box, cover and 20 Amp GFCI outlet. At the panel, add a 20 Amp breaker right below the existing 60 as a slot's already available. Remove the black wire from the 60 ...


2

Non-contact voltage testers can be very sensitive and misleading. So don't worry too much about that. This may have been asked before but do ANY of the outlets on the breaker that controls the dead ones have power? If you do, there is probably a connection failure in one of the outlets downstream. That doesn't eliminate the first outlet in the circuit ...


2

Thank you for your helpful feedback. My problem was an outdoor GFCI receptacle in line before the interior receptacle labeled Outlet 1 in my drawing.


2

Generally speaking, you can. The adapter doesn't much care what metal parts are between it and your service panel--even the outlets have internal contacts and screw connections. The only concern would be if the adapter has worn or dirty contacts or introduces noise due to protection circuitry or whatever. Even clean contacts reduce signal quality somewhat.


1

"You didn't slay the dragon!!!???" ---- Fiona, Shrek First, you have to rewire the circuit to 120V Which means moving wires around back at the service panel. You can't just slap a 120V socket on a 240V circuit, or you'll get 240V coming out of your 120V socket and you'll smoke anything you plug into it. The white wire needs to be moved to the neutral ...


1

I'm going to risk posting my comment as an answer. If the original outlet was truly a 240 volt outlet (probably a cable of 2 wire and a ground) and you didn't change the wiring in the main panel by moving the white wire (of the circuit) to the neutral bussbar making it a 120 volt circuit, your still going to get 240 v on your new outlet. The outlet has no ...


1

The proper way to do this would be to replace the 14/2 or 12/2 with a 14,12/3 cable. At the ceiling connect your new black to hot, new white to existing white and white from light fixture, and red to the black from the light. At the switch box, pigtail hot to brass screw of outlet and to top of switch or follow directions on box if using combination switch/...


1

How well do you know what other connections are on the same circuit as the outlets you're troubleshooting? Since the "opposite wall" outlet isn't behaving the same, it might be experiencing a completely different issue. So the first thing I'd do is try to figure out definitively (a) what breaker are the outlets on, and (b) what other outlets or fixtures ...


1

I just did this on the medicine cabinet I installed in my bathroom. The issue I think you are going to face is the depth of the wall - at least looking at the picture. I mounted a box on the side of the cabinet in mine but I had a full-depth wall. In your case I would tap into one of your 20 amp GFI protected outlets next to the cabinet using BX cable. Put a ...


1

My actual solution I fixed this a while ago but never came back to update the post. I ended up getting a Wemo smart light switch (since I already have other Wemo devices) and wired that to the load side of my GFCI to control my outside outlet. Looks nice and works great!


1

Most likely the sockets in question are on the lighting circuit. Nothing explicitly forbids putting 13A sockets on a lighting circuit. However it is widely seen as bad practice because future users of the installation may plug larger loads into the socket and trip out the lights. Better to change the plug on the lamp or to buy or make an adapter.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible