60

It's in the Building and Electrical Codes You may have noticed that you can walk into a room that you've never been in before, and reach for a light switch, your hand has a really good chance of finding it. It's almost like magic, and it's so universal that people take it for granted. Actually, it's no accident. It's required by both the electrical and the ...


26

There is no need for tape inside a device box except perhaps as a wire colour marker (phase taping, etc). Outlets, switches, device boxes, cable, clamps, breakers - all of these devices have clear and specific installation methods that ensure they perform to the safety standards against which they are tested. Hacks like this do not count themselves among ...


12

If you are going to do it you go 3-4 times around the outlet so it covers the metal and doesn't slip off. Also do not use the cheapo stuff that comes in at $2 for 5 rolls. This shouldn't be a common thing. I do it only when using smaller metal boxes and the side screws are very close to the edge or touching to prevent arcing. If you are leaving too ...


11

All your listed options will work. Folded edge covers always fit a bit wonky, unfortunately they don't make a crushed corner version for 4-11/16" boxes Gap between faceplate and mud ring that looks incorrect, possible hazard A lot of work, 4.5" face plate will extend past edge of box, less hazard A lot of work, will look the best, possible damage ...


9

Additional reason: More than 20 years ago I had a socket in the garden, switched from the inside. That was to deny any unauthorized person a connection for power tools. While still doing that, is is no longer effective as everything is battry operated now.


7

A duplex 15 amp receptacle is legal on a 20 amp circuit. As long as there are 2 or more 15 amp receptacles on a 20 amp branch circuit it is code compliant with the NEC see table 210.21.B.3


6

If I understand your question, the answer is no. Or, yes, you "can". But no, you should not use a hollow table as the electrical enclosure for a home-made power strip unless the table was actually designed to be an electrical enclosure. Instead you should buy ready-made boxes that do what you want. If you want to have power outlets embedded in a ...


6

A number of years ago it was required by building code to have a switched receptacle if there are no ceiling fixtures in a room. It still is I am certain. It is a safety issue for entering a room when it is dark. If you have a ceiling light, then I believe it can go, but to remove all the related wiring and switch will require drywall work and/or a blank ...


6

If you look carefully at your old outlet, you’ll see that there is embossed on the outlet “line” near one pair and “load” near the other. The line wires are the power feed and the load wires run onto more outlet and/or lights that are also protected by the GFCI. If you want, you can connect the load wires to the load terminals of the new GFCI. However, then ...


6

Given that your box is surface mounted, #1 (domed cover) is the correct answer. Converting to a 4x4 box is way too much work. Using a mud ring (even a flat one) with a cover plate will create sharp edges to snag things. Noting that 4-11/16" boxes have plenty of room for GFCIs and such, if your garage is wanting for a GFCI on that circuit/those ...


5

Good thing you found this it was not correct. The first 2 methods are both ok and would depend on what look you want. Code actually requires more than 1 screw for the receptacles. If you use option 1 you can put all 3 screws in if you like but NEC 110.14.A requires more than 1 for each (to anchor the receptacle). You can use the 4-0 box and covers your the ...


4

No tape in permanent installations! Tape glue. No matter how much reputable and expensive the tape brand is, there is always a possibility for the glue to become either liquid, or dust-like, or electrically conductive over time. Yes, I have seen all these things more than once, including all of them at once. Cooling. Every conductor heats under load and it ...


4

A remote switch for an power outlet can also be a safety measure. When I was a child, a TV appliance caught fire during the night and we lost part of our home. When my parents got to build their own house later, they put a master switch on each room that would control all power outlets in that room. Every night they would make the rounds cutting off power to ...


3

That's inappropriate since they are only rated for 13A. Just install the built-in outlets, then come out with an appropriate length of cordage with a proper strain relief where it comes out of the box. Bonus points for the "Chinese finger puzzle" variety.


3

Generally, 14 inch-pounds is safe, although you can go somewhat higher if you wish UL 498 (i.e the standard for receptacles in the US) calls out a tightening torque of 12-14 inch-pounds for wire binding screws (depending on size) in Table 123.3 as part of the Terminal Strength Test, and repeats that 14 inch-pound figure for 12AWG wire in 113.13 for the ...


3

It looks like you lost one of the hot legs to your service. It could be a bad connection on your main breaker, a bad connection in the meter base (had this exact same thing happen at my church's parsonage...an old house with very old electrical), or a bad connection at the transformer, or the overhead (assuming you have an overhead feed) connections to the ...


3

The NEC doesn't regulate devices but wiring & wiring methods for structures. This is a case if all components are UL approved components are used and wiring methods yes you could create a “power strip” of sorts with multiple receptacles. This would be much like building a home made lamp using listed components it is legal but you can not sell them in ...


2

From where I am, there is no code requiring switches to power outlets but I have installed one for my autistic son's TV. I require that all appliances not in use be unplugged to save on the electric bill. The outlet switch however makes it easier for my son to just leave the TV plugged in reducing the chances for him to be electrocuted.


2

I would demo the entire back splash area removing all the Sheetrock. Trying to save 10$ (about a sheet) makes no sense to me because the Sheetrock gets damaged or has residue on it. I would rip& strip the tile and Sheetrock out and then if replacing with Sheetrock use green board or if tile use backer board to replace the Sheetrock. Replacing a large ...


2

Electricians look at tape wrapped around switches, receptacles, and wire nuts as an amateur tell. I agree it's a bad idea around a wire nut, but I am in the minority that feel it's a good idea around device screws. If someone ever wants to remove the device from an energized box - which there's very, very seldom a good reason to do - who ever takes it out ...


2

First, you need to change that to a 4-prong socket (NEMA 14-30) and cord (and I bet the dryer came with a 4-prong cord). The 3-prong type is obsolete and dangerous. If the neutral wire loses contact, it will energize the chassis of the dryer - and I bet the washing machine is grounded, isn't it? :) It's a matter of time before you touch the equipment in ...


2

You MUST attach the ground to the metal box FIRST. You can pigtail, but what you can't do is take ground to the receptacle only. The receptacle will automagically pick up ground off the metal box in certain circumstances. the box screw ear, and receptacle, have hard flush clean metal contact, with the screws bottomed out (not floating on drywall ears; no ...


2

Take the #10 AWG ground from your cable and loop it to your metal box with a 10/32 grounding screw. There should be a threaded hole for this in the box. Extend the ground outward an attach it to your outlet.


2

Good to be proactive and catch this before the tile goes up. Obvious problems I see are that the drywall is poorly cut (can take it out and trace it to re-cut a matching piece without gaps or overcut at almost no cost so easily fixed). Any of a drywall cutout tool, a Dremel, a keyhole saw, a hacksaw blade or a drill with a side cut bit can cut the piece ...


2

Complete power strips that take a 10A IEC input (on a cable extension or directly), have mounting flanges and optionally also come with IEC outputs are readily available - though they are not available much in super cheap, low quality versions, since their main use is in datacenter and industrial control 19" racks. Search for "PDU". Most of ...


2

The National Building Code (NBC) -not the electrical code- requires that smoke alarm be permanently connected to a lighting circuit, or one that supplies both lighting and receptacles. So if you have a junction box feeding a smoke detector, you can feed an outlet from there too. You will have to add a lighting circuit to it. AFCI/GFCI circuits are permitted, ...


1

You should also consider cement board vice drywall. Cement board is stiffer and is preferred for anywhere that can get wet. In this case doing one small area does matter but the stiffer part will help.


1

Ok what probably happened is the overload found a weak point in the wiring that blew open during the short as the breaker was tripping. I am not going to brow beat you up about working on a live circuit it should not be done but yes sometimes pros do have to work on live circuits. And pulling out a circuit to test it is quite common. What you need to do is ...


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