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23

Adding the short wire is called pigtails and it is code compliant so yes you can do this. Pigtails are a superior way of making connections in my opinion. The pigtails do not add to the wire volume in the box.


22

The most important rule in NEC is 110.3(B), which requires you to follow labeling and instructions... which means read them. In this case, that only makes things better, particularly the boldface in 4a and 4b. These explain how to use Leviton's "back-wire" feature, which allows placing 2 wires under each screw. Pay heed to the word "FIRMLY&...


6

A feeder is breaker and wiring that supplies a subpanel. A branch circuit is breaker and wiring that supplies various outlets, including receptacle outlets. "Outlets" does include hardwired loads, or as they like to call them, "utilization equipment". Wiring can be one or the other, not both. You cannot have outlets on a feeder. So no. ...


6

The moment you put any wires in that pipe, you must put a lid on the box. This is mandatory! The lid can either be a blank (they're like 20 cents), or can have a cutout for a socket aka receptacle. For instance if you are connecting the EVSE with a cord and plug, you would choose a lid that has a cutout for the socket that you need. Or, if you are ...


6

You don’t use any strain relief. Wires are supposed to be able to slide completely freely through conduit. You terminate the wires inside the junction boxes, of course, and they don’t move around when you’re not working on the wiring. Any strain happens to the device cord, which is designed for movement.


4

Forget it - there's no such thing. UL is the reason. Manufacturers approached UL about creating just that, and UL said no - mainly the interest is in the industrial space. Why? As soon as you provide some sort of programmatic API for a GFCI or really any other protective device... some jackass will come along and write a script which automatically resets ...


3

With the tabs intact the receptacles both are always hot, no electrical safety issue when the outlet and switched outlet are on the same breaker. I have been called in for this more than a few times when a home owner replaced receptacles and did not notice the tab was originally broken. I have seen the switched receptacle and the other receptacle on ...


3

Not exactly what you are looking for, in terms of form factor, but it will have the desired net effect. Get a multiple outlet strip with a master/slave configuration, like this APC: These are typically used for "Turn on computer, monitor and printer turn on automatically" or "Turn on TV, sound system turns on automatically", but can be ...


3

First of all, a dryer receptacle is rated 30 amps, not 40, so if it's on a 40 amp breaker, you're already in violation. If you truly have a 40 amp circuit (#8 copper wire minimum) the you're ok for the wires being on a 40 amp breaker but not the receptacle. If you have #10 copper on a 40 amp breaker then you are overfused. Either way, there is nothing wrong ...


2

You are going to have to figure out how to keep the foam out of the boxes. Once it cures you are fine. You will have to use the low expanding stuff and keep it from entering the back tabs. The fronts we saran wrap and rubber band. The back tabs are not easy to block. I don't really understand the logistics you have going on here too... You have the ...


2

No, you won't be. Nothing uses NEMA 10 type connectors. The NEMA 10 socket does't have a ground wire, which makes it pretty dangerous especially in a 120/240V appliance! It hasn't been legal to install groundless receptacles since the 1960s. There was a special exception for dryers and ranges particularly, but that too has been outlawed for 25 years now. ...


2

You could run a second cable. Remove the tabs from both sides of the receptacle. Switched hot/neutral from switch cable to top (or bottom) screws, hot/neutral from always-on cable to bottom (or top) screws. But while it costs a little more for a 3-wire (plus ground) cable instead of a 2-wire (plus ground) cable, that would let you have just one cable instead ...


1

No, you would need to run an entirely new "/3" cable which contains all the related conductors. NEC 300.3(B). Pigtails are only allowed inside boxes.


1

The last time something like this happened to me -- a suddenly dead outlet -- I went to each outlet or wiring point on that circuit, which were all in the same room, and gave it a good sharp rap with the fleshy part of my fist. One of those raps restored the power to the dead outlet; the vibration re-connected a loose connection behind that outlet. I ...


1

The other two answers don't address specifically why your idea is against code. The code requires that a single path (cable or conduit) contain wires carrying equal current in both directions (hot and neutral). This is to keep magnetic fields balanced and avoid heating for eddy currents. The ideal way to do this is to replace your existing /2 cable with a /3 ...


1

We can only guess why they used a 50A receptacle, confusion or convenience (using what you got) are the top candidates in my opinion. Using a 50A plug on a 30A drier would be a clear violation of the NRTL Listing which includes the installation instructions that certainly include cord rating, but there is a misaligned interpretation of the NEC eguarding the ...


1

Not all GFCI outlets are made the same. Some have “Line” on the top, some have “Load” on the top. Check it. Don’t make the same mistake I did assuming you can simply pull an outlet and replace the new one the exact same way.


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