19

Did you shock yourself? Most likely not. The plastic handle of the scissors, though not rated or approved by any regulatory test lab for cutting live wires, is likely to have protected you. There's also a fair chance that your body wasn't in contact with any grounded conductor, so even if you did come in contact with the live wire, you would not have been ...


18

That is a junction box, and must remain accessible (plastic or metal cover, cover can be painted.) NEC 314.29 If the wiring is completely removed, you can remove the junction box, but usually the wiring is serving some purpose and that is not practical.


17

Welcome to the Magic 8-ball: Harper calls these the Magic 8-Ball because they sometimes produce meaningless, seemingly random, results. But for straightforward wire swaps they are exactly the tool to use. These testers make what you found out the hard way a bit easier - i.e., you can plug them into each 120V receptacle to very quickly find out what is going ...


15

You'll want to turn off the breaker. You should be alright but if the internals of the outlet are damaged or broken, you don't want to come in contact with them when you pull out the ground plug. You might even want to replace the outlet since the grounding terminal shouldn't just break off under normal use, unless the extension cord was really damaged.


13

The tall one is neutral, and should be near ground. Of course, Neutral Is Not Ground :) It's possible the outlet is miswired. It's also possible that it suffered a neutral wire break somewhere between here and the panel. Ground is ground, hot is hot, as intended... but neutral is floating. In actuality it's being pulled up to hot voltage because a load ...


12

I don’t use back stabs and although code allows them this is by far the largest cause of failed wiring in my experience (worse than aluminum wiring). Since I don’t see a release I would NOT reuse because if the worst happens and the stranded wires start backing out they may contact the transformer or grounded box. It would be a good idea to pigtail the Hots ...


12

Play it safe. Replace the receptacle. What else can you get these days for 71 cents? $1.24 if you get tamper-resistant (which nobody likes but you're supposed to use in many places now) and $2.18 for commercial-grade instead of residential-grade (electrically the same but built a bit better).


9

The ground pin is safe to remove with pliers. The ground will normally only have power on it in a fault condition or if you have electronic switches no neutral that use the ground but even then it is safe with un insulated pliers most metal lamps and devices the metal is attached to the ground and we don’t get shocked by that.


6

You cannot just use an adapter and hook your generator up to your house electrical panel. You need a transfer switch to isolate your service from the power company when your generator is in use. Installing one can be pretty complicated and permits are usually involved. Unless you are very knowledgeable about what's involved, getting professional help would ...


5

So, I fixed this today. I went to Home Depot and picked up 3 new outlets. The one that was working had the downstream neutral and hot wire flipped. That fixed the issue and I’m getting correct readings on all outlets and everything works perfectly. Glad it was something small and not a wire trace or something in the breaker box. Thanks everyone for your ...


5

There are a whole bunch of important safety issues here. But the two key items - that must be followed: 3-prong vs. 4-prong: While there are some exceptions (the issue of old 3-prong dryer receptacles vs. new 4-prong), typically that is the difference between 120V (hot/neutral/ground) and 240V (hot/hot/neutral/ground). That is a big difference. If you ...


4

A sloppy job, but you're overthinking it. Having been cut, no current is flowing through the backstab, so no heating, no arcing, no problem other than if you handle the outlet while the circuit breaker is on and fail to respect the short stubby live wires poking out the back. Since it's generally inadvisable to play with receptacles out of their box with the ...


4

You're pretty much right on target. Wire nut the two black wires in the box to one black wire from the switch. Check to make sure the switch instructions don't specify "line" and "load" on the wires. One of your black wires in the box is your always hot and the other one is a tap off the hot to another location, probably the always hot on ...


3

This answer is similar to previous. If the wires in the box are "live" (still energized), they must remain accessible. If you can conclusively (professionally) determine that the wires are "dead" (best if the supply end is disconnected and removed from the next, upstream access point (another outlet box, or electrical panel), you can ...


3

That weird wire is your neutral, and the conduit's your ground Your building was wired using what appears to be cloth-covered wires in metal conduit. This would not be atypical for a large or high-rise building in the 1940s, especially in an urban area with strict building codes. The mottled pattern you see on the wires in the back of the box is a simple ...


3

Using an NEC Handbook, which is the NEC with more information and comments, I find that the pigtails are currently counted as part of the device fill rather than a separate conductor. All of this can be found in Article 314.16 and the associated tables. The NEC Handbook has a set of separate commentary tables. In particular, Table 314.3 shows how different ...


3

Turn off the breaker for that outlet, it's the only way to be sure you're safe. If you don't know which breaker controls that outlet then plug in a lamp, turn it on, and go hunting for the breaker. As far as I know lamps commonly use only 2 prongs so the ground pin should not be an issue. If you can then remove the prong with pliers and turn the breaker back ...


3

Looks like someone has wired in a hot wire to neutral, or you have a disconnected neutral leg somewhere. You need to trace the neutral side with the power off. I highly recommend getting a professional in, because mainly for liability/insurance reasons. Other reasons also being that it seems likely that it's DIY work gone wrong and there may be other faults ...


3

All junction boxes in use, whether with receptacles, splices, switches or other devices, must be accessible. Move 'Em This is probably the generally "best" answer. But it may involve significant work, depending on the type of wall. However, not only can receptacles not be covered, junction boxes can't be covered, even if they are only in use for a ...


3

After long hours of testing, it happened that the lunatics that made my installation actually switched the live wire and the pilot wire on the main panel's differential. This is very misleading and seems utterly dangerous as this wire is shared among several outlets. Therefore, despite turning the power off on another outlet, my pilot wire was powered on and ...


3

Did not ultimately get a lot of help here, but I figured it out myself, so posting in case there are others who run into a similar situation. The first key was figuring out how the wires in each box matched up. I connected D, the hot wire, first to A, then to B, which helped me figure out which two wires in the switch box they matched up to. C I knew was the ...


3

Like Ecnerwal says, you lost a phase. 99% of the time this is the power company's problem, and they come out and fix it for free. Simply report an outage. But why aren't half my circuits dead? Because the two phases are shorted together. OK it's not a dead-short, it's a low-resistance short. If the power were working normally, this thing would be making ...


2

According to NEC 2020, you need 1 for the first 9 square feet and another for each 18 square feet. 92" x 39" = ~ 25 square feet. So you need at least 2. I would put one duplex receptacle on each end. That would be better than flush mounted receptacles (big concern about spills). But you can certainly have more receptacles, and that may be a good ...


2

You didn't get shocked because there was no complete circuit through you. That's why birds can sit on high voltage wires that aren't even insulated and be just fine. There's no circuit. Had you been barefoot on a wet concrete floor and used all metal scissors (no plastic handle), you might have gotten shocked... probably would have. It could have given you ...


2

Use a metal box cover with a knockout in it. I think you will have enough room to access the screws of the cover. You will need a plug for the knockout on the side. Or, the box is surface mounted, add a spacer behind it.


2

#2. On a separate note, why are the white wires to the disposal connected to the line out to the next outlets? That is completely wrong. I don't know what they were thinking! It sounds like you have 2 completely separate circuits in this box: One that powers the disposal, and a double circuit (MWBC) that powers the receps. When you have multiple circuits in ...


2

I pulled the stab back connections, pushed them in firmly, Can't do that. Backstab connections are ONE TIME use. Whatever you did to pull the wires out, that has "sprung the spring" and it no longer has the original gripping strength. It is not capable of holding the wire again. If they ever were, LOL. But this is the crux of the problem with ...


2

You found a classic case of why backstabs are considered bad news by many electricians. When you pulled the receptacles out the connection was temporarily reconnected and the lighting is working again. As we don’t know if everything was proper to start with but is functioning now I can tell you this will normally happen again and eventually burn the wire ...


2

If the box is grounded by the conduit, you can get self tapping grounding screws and screw one into the hole in the back of the box. Then wrap your ground from your NM cable around the grounding screw and tighten. Use the proper NM to box connector. Make sure you're not in an area that requires conduit. In my humble opinion, the wiring shown in the lower box ...


1

Man, you guys just looooove your plastic boxes. You'll do anything to keep em. I'm a metal conduit guy and it would never occur to me to use a plastic box. Using a screw to attach a box to a joist isn't even a problem in my world. No inspector would flag a metal box for that. The screw holes you use, they're either pre-made or you drill them (set that ...


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