25

What a mess... Assuming that your diagnosis is correct - two wires in the same cable connected to totally separate breakers, you have several different problems going on: A 30A dryer receptacle should be on a pair of 30A breakers. This is 2 independent 15A breakers. You don't add (though it sounds logical) 15A + 15A to get 30A, because the 30A refers to 30A ...


15

I think mark f has already answered your question well. I just wanted to add some photos from a similar project I did last year in case these are helpful to you. I installed a weatherproof cover and box to replace the old ones that supplied my above-ground pool. Fair warning: don't do this at your own pool because my installation was deficient in several ...


12

I have heard debates on this subject. It's very common to do just as you say, run indoor rated NM through the wall to a surface mounted exterior box. In my opinion, when you come through the sheath, you're outdoors, and it's not compliant. Only for inches, and I would be really surprised if it ever amounted to anything, but still not compliant. If you want ...


11

I would suggest an update to a extra duty double gang cover. Extra duty or “in use” covers are made to be used while something is plugged in. Taymac mx6200 is a cover that has 55 configurations made by Hubbell this will replace your existing cover and it has switch plates and receptacle plates that snap in so your configuration is what you need. This is a ...


10

Unless your appliance likes 240V, this is a very bad plan. Measure between the black and white wires when the breakers are on. Then turn them off and rip this mess out. That's a very not remotely to code outlet. Nor is what propose doing (if this were not all the things it is) remotely to code or safe. 3-wire dryer outlets have been off the table for 20 ...


10

Multiwire branch circuits (MWBCs) share a neutral. There is a code rule that prohibits wiring devices, such as receptacles, in a way that the removing the device would open (i. e., disconnect) that shared neutral. If the device is pigtailed, that rule is satisfied because removing the device doesn't disconnect anything else on the circuit from the neutral. ...


10

NEC is a bit vague here 334.12(B) says Types NM and NMS. Types NM and NMS cables shall not be used under the following conditions or in the following locations: (4)Where exposed or subject to excessive moisture or dampness So batplasterson is right that it's not technically correct. The box is a wet location. The rule mostly ...


9

I prefer the "up and over" method rather than drilling thru the studs, esp. since you don't intend to finish the walls. Not sure what code says about that. I believe that exposed cable below a certain height needs to be protected (8 feet?) So that would mean running the cable in conduit for the 4-5' from the outlet to near the top plate. When I ...


7

You're not allowed to supply NEMA 5-20R receptacles with a 50A circuit breaker. That is dangerous! I suggest an additional penetration for the new receptacles, which should be put on a 20A breaker(s). You probably don't want to stuff additional wire into the conduit that already has the RV circuit going through it. If you don't think you'll use both the RV ...


7

No, you really need to fix that. Search this site for "Lost Neutral" for what happens when the neutral wire has a problem. It's bad, and it can set stuff on fire. Look at that neutral in your photo. Simply to transit this box, current must go through four splices. Two on each receptacle - supply, jumper, jumper and onward. That's 4 places for ...


7

Replace the existing cover (and switch plate) with a new two gang outdoor cover such as one like this: The new cover seals against the existing outdoor rated handy box via a weather seal. You will likely need to put a new cover plate over the switch as well. And be sure the Outlet or entire Circuit is GFCI protected since its outside.


6

Connection Plug 1 currently has 3 wires: White neutral back to the panel White neutral to Plug 2 Black switched hot to the switch Run a cable (black/white) from Plug 1 to New Plug. Add a white pigtail (short wire) and connect one end to both existing neutral wires and to the white wire going to New Plug. Connect the other end to one of the existing neutral ...


6

Lights on their own breaker is good. One breaker per wall is dubious. If you alternate the breakers feeding outlets there's a bit more wire, but when you are working in an area and plug two things into adjacent outlets, less chance of a trip. Or, use dual-gang plates/boxes and put the two duplex outlets in each box on different breakers. You can use ...


5

Check for a bad splice or connection in the neutral at the last good outlet Between the outlet-tester results and the lack of power to the GFCI at the end of the chain, this is likely a bad splice or connection at the last good outlet's neutral. Backstab-type connections on receptacles are commonly to blame for this; if you see any, converting them to side-...


4

The problem is not a fire it is a shock hazard. As far as if it is important, it has been code for decades. The issue comes when the neutral may get separated then everything down from there won’t work, but there are still 2 hot legs with GFCI protection. The risk is low but it should be updated. A wirenut and pigtails to the receptacles really won’t take ...


4

The short wires are called "pigtails". As you gathered, it was important that the two black non-pigtails remain connected to each other irrespective of the receptacle. You can use the 2 screws on the receptacle as an ad-hoc splice block... but that doesn't work if the tab is broken. The purpose of the tab is allow you to use it as a splice block ...


4

The last GFCI surely has no power and thus the off LED and the inability to reset. If it is a missing NEUTRAL as you suspect this could be at any of the outlets. Be aware that outlets are typically wired in a long string with cables going from one to the next and the next and so on. Working outlets are going to be closer to the source power feed of the ...


3

The code requires that the box be "rigidly and securely fastened" to the purlin. Rivets seem OK to me, and I think would seem OK to most inspectors. Having some specs on the mechanical strength of the rivets might help you if there's a question. Rivets are specifically mentioned as an acceptable way to fasten a box to the frame of a ceiling grid. ...


3

You are correct. The broken tab is blocking the electricity from continuing to the second black wire and on to the other outlets. Easiest thing is to simply replace the outlet so that the tab is unbroken. If you want to keep the old outlet, you can put the wirenut back together while adding an additional short wire (pigtail) so that you can connect both ...


2

Since you're not finishing the walls (ie covering with drywall) then the wiring can be seen. If its exposed, it can be damaged easier. Personally I'd look at installing a series of dwangs (nods) across the wall, that can be used as storage shelves. If there's one just at the height of your outlets, then the cable can be secured under that shelf and pass ...


2

Your plan sounds good Drilling the studs is fine and usually uses less wire. (Both are ok) Make sure your hole is 1-1/4” back from the face of the stud on either side. Your shop lights don’t require a GFCI if they are hard wired but if plugged in they do require a GFCI (crazy I know but code is explicit there are no exceptions) You may think about outside ...


2

Really it would depend on the quality of the voltage converter, which is pretty hard to tell. Another option might be to order the US adapter for the razor. https://amzn.to/2SyAHXq


2

No, certainly not the adapters you show in your photos. Those are nothing more than physical adapters, i.e. they provide electrical connections directly from their prongs to their outlet socket. If your device (e.g. the shaver) is able to charge properly using such adapters, then it already has the necessary electronics in it to convert the line voltage to ...


2

No, you're fine. Presumably your device can auto detect the voltage (many can), but you'd wan to be sure. If it can't the device could be destroyed or catch fire, but the electrical system will be fine.


2

Somebody probably switched the plug on the factory cord to run some 240V device - could be a welder, a table saw, etc., so they could use a 20A 120V receptacle they had on hand, then made bootleg connections in the panel. Their creative wiring made a number of code violations and safety issues. In the panel, you can't use separate breakers for a 240V ...


2

You're not required to get a all in one RV Park Panel, but it's much simpler to install for the price. Everything is included, meets code requirements, not really that much more in material costs, less labor to install and is a single point connection. Meaning it's hard to screw up. Much better for a DIY.


2

What you showed us a picture of is a single receptacle. (1-socket). They make a very similar thing, which fits in the same space in the wall, which has 2 sockets instead of 1. You can go ahead and swap that one for the 2-socket variety. I would do it both locations so you have 4 sockets total. That way you have a spare. This is straightforward work for a ...


2

Short answer: You don't really know why that receptacle doesn't work, and the simplest thing is to just shut off the main. If it's a bad receptacle as you are assuming, you can't test it reliably outside the box. That puts you in a bit of a catch 22; you can't figure out which branch circuit breaker the receptacle is on, so you can't shut off the branch ...


1

I'd start with a three-light tester and determine if the malfunctioning receptacle has any voltage. If the three-light test indicates the hot is still working, you'll be able to use a circuit breaker finder to identify which breaker supplies the receptacle. Use a non-contact voltage tester before handling any of the wiring inside the receptacle's box, even ...


1

You can't, really. You can try locating the breaker for nearby outlets, but this doesn't guarantee the right one will be found. Instead, begin your troubleshooting with the proper tools. Get yourself an inexpensive multi-meter and check the wires in the outlet box for power using the 200v AC setting. It's usually safe to work if you check voltage between hot ...


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