12

Yes, and I've done this myself. But not two outlets. The generator side one is an inlet. (These also come in a form-factor that is the same as an outlet). From the inlet, you use in-the-wall wiring to go to as many outlets and lights as makes sense for a single circuit. If you want 2 circuits, you can have 2 inlets, and plug each one into a ...


7

Pigtail , pigtail , pigtail, and hook up your new receptacle. The back stab (the push in connection is the largest failure point of any wiring method I have ever heard of but “safe” because when they fail they are inside a box. Hook your 3 blacks and a short section of wire together with a wire nut then this shorter wire to the gold screw. Do the same with ...


6

The formal technical term is Ms. Winky (sockets are female)... That is a NEMA 6-20. It provides 240V at up to 16 amps continuous. The fuses must be 20A, that is the only size allowed here. As a general rule, you can never give yourself more power by up-sizing fuses or breakers, so put that idea right out of your head and never consider it again. It's ...


6

The connection method The last guy used the backstabs out of "necessity" (read: it was a "necessity" to use a 60 cent outlet instead of a $2.60 outlet that had screw-to-clamp terminals). Follow Ed Beal's advice here, but with pigtails, that box will get rather crowded. The box fill As for practical fill, Ed Beal covers that very well. Statutory fill ...


4

In response to your question: DO NOT connect the two conductors together. Two things you need to pay attention to. First make sure that the conductors have not been painted over. In many cases the conductors appear to be the same color, but by scratching and scrapping the true color will become apparent. Second, because general house wiring is in NM and ...


4

NEMA 6-15 and you're done Outlets aren't that expensive. Simply fit the correct one. The third one. If your wiring is 12 AWG or larger copper and your breaker is 20A, you can fit a NEMA 6-20 instead. Now, noting this thing is dual voltage, the right way to deal with that is have it have a removable inlet (the way a PC does) that takes an IEC ...


4

I don't know whether it's ok or not from a code perspective, but I wouldn't do it. If I were you I would install access points and power them with POE. You'll get much better and more reliable wifi. It will be a little more expensive especially if you already own the extenders, but would definitely be cheaper if you have to run new circuits.


3

3-prong outlets are obsolete and very dangerous. Specifically, the appliance industry lobbied NFPA to allow bootlegging ground on dryers and ranges, on the logic that these sockets are rarely disturbed. However, This means an ordinary failure in the neutral wire electrifies the chassis of the appliance. As such, any failure in a 3-prong appliance cord is ...


3

No. That 120V plug can give small amounts of electricity, like to spin the drum or run the blower. Normally the heat comes from gas. What you bought there is an electric dryer. That thing requires INSANE amounts of electricity, and the little 120V plug cannot possibly provide it. You can search the room (or other potential places where a laundry room ...


3

All GFCI devices are able to protect portions of a circuit downline. GFCIs simply look for differences in hot and neutral current; they don't even need ground for that. Because of this, putting two GFCIs on a circuit is usually wasteful. *Connecting them nose-to-tail, elephant style, is playing a "Yo Dawg" trick on yourself! It will drive you crazy if ...


3

The gap you are seeing is well within the normal limits of adjustment for standard yokes (the metal thing the screws go through). You just tightened down the yoke screws and let them land where they may. You'll need to back them off, shift the outlet and switch around as needed, and repeatedly try the plate until it lines up. If the yokes don't give ...


2

Assuming that the outlet was working, then no, do not splice them together. One of the white wires must be the hot and the other neutral, despite them both being white. Find that would make me very nervous about the house wiring in general. Do you know if the house was previously owned by a tinkerer who might have added that outlet? Any idea who wired the ...


2

That is a NEMA 6-20, 240 volt 20 amp outlet. It will have two "hot" wires and no neutral. There should be 240 Volts between the two hot wires, and it should be fed by two fuses, one in each hot wire, or by a two-pole breaker.


2

You have what you need. That box or every one I have ever seen are listed for outdoor use. I would open your transfer switch, find a handy spot and drill a hole through the wall install a bushing or short piece of conduit to connect the transfer switch to the inlet and secure the inlet box. I will use caulking around the bushing or nipple to seal it up.


2

When things are plugged in to different outlets in different locations, but are all on the same circuit, from that given protective device ( breaker / fuse ) and a neutral becomes disconnected that neutral will become "hot". Try seeing how many things you know are plugged in to that circuit if possible and you'll possibly find a few things that aren't ...


2

Nope, because it's a receptacle in a bathroom Any receptacle you add in any bathroom must be on a circuit that follows one of these rules. The circuit serves ONLY bathroom receptacles, and nothing else - no receptacles outside bathrooms, no fixed loads of any kind. These bathroom receptacles can be in any number of bathrooms. The circuit serves ONLY ...


2

I would replace the outlet. For whatever reason the outlet wasn't making contact with the plug. The "jaws" of the outlet can soften up because of age and heat generated from the current flow. Pushing them closer together is just a band aid and they will probably spread apart again causing some arcing ... during Thanksgiving day or Christmas. Good luck. Also ...


1

Note that in some areas (in New Zealand, for example), your emergency lighting and signage needs to be regularly tested. Typically by disconnecting the power to those circuits for e.g. 2 hours. Do you want your networking to fall over every few months when the tests happen? This looks like conduit; you may be able to pull more wires for another circuit. ...


1

You should be able to put in a normal receptacle or other device there. Assuming this is inside a bathroom, it will need to either include a GFCI here or earlier in the circuit (e.g., GFCI breaker). Since the black and white are in pairs, something else is powered after this on the same circuit, so best practice is to add pigtails to the existing black & ...


1

If you have conduit you will have to pull a black #12 or #14 copper wire from the light switch to the outlet. Pigtail this wire in the switch box to the black (feed) wire going to the switch. at the outlet connect the black wire to the screw next to the red wire. Now remove, break off, the tab by the brass screws. If you have Romex wiring, you will need to ...


1

This is cable has a cloth sheath. These old metal boxes weren't designed for today's devices. One option is to change the breaker feeding this circuit to a GFCI breaker although these can be costly. I don't know where you live, but in our jurisdiction here in Michigan, you aren't required to replace every outlet with a GFCI, only the first one on the ...


1

You would need a weather tight box, and a cover that would allow your cord cap (plug) to be connected WHILE it is raining, so usually with a built-in double lipped rubber seal arrangement where the cord cap and inlet cover are matched. Your cord itself would need to be what's called "portable cord", usually type SJOW, and the connection to the cord cap would ...


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