8

Your two options here are to pigtail the hots and neutrals, or get a new "backwire" outlet. A backwire outlet has small wire clamps on the sides of the outlet so the wire can be inserted straight in rather than looping around the screw. This type of outlet might be sold as "heavy duty", but they are great for handling up to 4 conductors on each side. The ...


7

The supply circuit breaker has to protect not just the cables in the wall, but also the flexible cords to the appliances. If you had 50A circuit breakers, the appliance cords would have to be rated to carry the higher fault current in the event of a short-circuit. The fault current would be several times 50A, but usually for a short time, depending on the ...


6

Removing an outside load bearing wall is serious, it will be worth the few hundred dollars to ask the opinion of a structural engineer. They will be able to calculate the loads and give you a stamp of approval. I take it you're doing this without pulling any permits.


5

Yes, aside from checking with a tester to make sure the circuit is actually off... there are several subtle issues that frequently catch novices. Don't remove screws all the way - they are captive. After some distance they will start getting stiff. Stop there, don't force them. There's your tab. This $1 outlet was ruined, by soldering (!) and removing ...


5

It does violate the NEC (assuming that you are in the US and the NEC applies to you). UF cable is not designed to connect to portable cord devices, portable cord devices are not designed to accept UF cable. Article 110.3(B) states: "Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling....


4

If you really want that, you can use an MWBC It sounds like you want to throw more than 20A into a room. That can be done. But you really, really need to bone up on the particulars of Code, because this is easy to dangerously botch. You can use a multi-wire branch circuit, which uses a /3 cable to provide 2 hots and a common neutral. You are able to then ...


4

I agree, this is "nope". The way I would handle this - first, I'd use metal boxes because I'm lazy about running ground wires. I'd start by removing the current box. I'd knock out the highest 1/2" or 3/4" knockout and fit an EMT spacer to connect to a 4-11/16" square steel box. We'll need the room. Fit a steel cover that provides 2 Decora. One slot ...


4

I suspect it comes from long experience, and that it's all about current, not voltage. Why? Because despite being isolated when these standards were set, everyone reached the same conclusion - UK, Germany, Greece, Russia, Soviet Union, Italy, Spain, etc. I believe that's because of the relationship between breaker trip and the potential fire damage an arc-...


4

You can put a plain outlet anywhere you please. The reason this is an issue is that in certain locations, the outlet needs to be GFCI protected. And you can't put a GFCI test/reset button that high. So if GFCI protection is even required, take advantage of a feature of almost every GFCI device, called "Load", which allows it to protect plain devices ...


4

It's in NEC 110.12. Mechanical Execution of Work. "Electrical equipment shall be installed in a neat and workmanlike manner." (which does not mean nipping back all the wires in your service panel). First, they make non-metallic caps for the ends of conduit fittings. Google "rigid conduit insulated bushing". They are nominally to prevent wire gouging, but ...


3

I'll be darned. You can do it. The crux of the issue is supplying a 20A NEMA 5-20 receptacle (T-shaped neutral) on a 15A breaker. Since you will only have one socket on the entire circuit, this applies. 210.21(B)(1) Single Receptacle on an Individual Branch Circuit. A single receptacle installed on an individual branch circuit shall have an ampere ...


3

The only safe thing to do is to disconnect the wires at the other end. That could be: The main panel A subpanel A junction box - e.g., the wires might come out of the ground next to the house and go into a junction box to splice to another set of wires that go to the main panel If you disconnect any place other than a panel (which obviously would be ...


3

You might get yourself a house wiring book and brush up before you have things smoldering. :) You can't reduce wire size like that. #12 and #14 have no business on a 30A circuit. You can increase wire size from the panel and then reduce it downstream to prevent voltage drop over very long runs, but I doubt that's necessary here. If you do, be sure to label ...


3

Safety First Always: It is very important that anything permanently installed - lights, receptacles, switches, etc. - be properly listed for your area. In the USA, this normally means UL listing. Beware of other marks - CE and many other marks (if legitimate!) do not actually mean the device was tested to meet verify that it meets safety requirements. ...


3

First, watch out for common gotcha's in changing outlets or switches. If any receptacle tabs have been broken off, this is a whole different ballgame. I am assuming you didn't mess with any of the other wires that were pushed back into the box and nutted to each other. If you did, and especially if the receptacle has been split, one of the black/white ...


2

No, you can't feed a split receptacle from circuits with differently-sized breakers. Here's why: You can, but you have to meet certain conditions: The National Electrical Code now requires that the two hot wires in a split receptacle must be connected to a double-pole circuit breaker, so that when the breaker is shut off, the action will automatically ...


2

Is it practical? I guess the question is, "does lightning strike twice?" One problem is with near misses. Lightning has so much voltage at biblical amperage, that it creates a voltage gradient across the ground. Earth at your remote outlet could be 20,000 volts hotter than your house. This is what kills animals; the voltage on their front feet is ...


2

The best solution to this problem is to pigtail the outlet: wire-nut all three hots together with a new, short length of 12 gauge black wire, and then connect that to the outlet. Do the same with the neutrals, using a short length of white. Ground can be either green or bare. As to which wire nut to use, that may vary a little based on brand, but ...


2

The 20 amp circuit breaker with 12/2 cable and 15 amp duplex receptacles allows for a total sustainable power consumption of 1,920 watts (20 amp x 80% x 120 volts) as opposed to 1,440 watts (15 amp x 80% x 120 volts). Thus, the 20 amp circuit breaker allows me to run a 1,500 watt spacer heater, a 170 watt laptop power adapter, and 2 external monitors all on ...


2

You are correct. You have two choices, neither pretty. Rewire the circuit If you are in a rental unit, this option is not available to you without landlord consent; and then; a licensed electrician must do it. Since the socket is NEMA 6-15, it is fairly likely the wire and cable behind it are 14 AWG. Open it up and have a look. If you're very ...


1

Isherwood raises the most relevant point I think, but another issue is that you would only be able to use an outlet (with the tabs removed) with maximum 15A rating. This pretty much negates any advantage of having a 20A circuit (presumably with 12G wire run) anyway.


1

A plug-in smart outlet is the wrong device for this Instead, what you want is a smart relay, or smart light switch. That way, you can wire directly off the load side of your GFCI, and will not need a creative solution to connect the output of a NEMA 5-15 socket into your fixed building wiring. Option 1: UL Listed Smart Relay Although specific product ...


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