36

The conduit is the grounding path Note that the wiring in your case is run not using sheathed cables, but as individual wires inside a metallic conduit (aka the pipe-like stuff you see heading off to the left in your picture). As a result, the conduit is a serviceable grounding path in its own right, connecting the receptacle grounds and boxes to the ...


25

I do a lot of work on older homes and see stuff like this all the time. Keep in mind that the equipment grounding conductor (EGC), that bare safety ground, was not always present in wiring systems. If you see old homes - a little older than this one - with two-prong receptacles, those were wired back before the EGC was part of the system. I think when ...


12

It looks like you are up against a corner on the left, which means you can't simply shift the outlet into the box location. In a perfect world you have enough cable to move the box to the other side of that stud. You would then simply repair your drywall. (We've since learned that there's a door to the right, just out of frame, making this impossible.) ...


11

Use a surface mount electrical box:


6

We have a FAQ for novices doing receptacles. There are many tricks and traps when changing receptacles. I wrote a Q&A specifically for folks like you, please review it. The #1 thing I'd say that isn't mentioned there is don't downgrade an outlet from GFCI to USB (unless it's redundant). Speaking of testing, those 3-lamp testers have 3 Rather ...


6

An outlet tester is a great way to determine that an outlet is wired correctly. They are also useful to show that the correct breaker has been tripped before you start working. Take pictures before you disconnect anything so you'll have accurate information in case you have to come back here and ask questions. Follow the directions that will be included with ...


5

Assuming we are talking about the US/Canada, I'll make some basic assumptions: Not the stove just the oven would almost always mean electric oven. That is because gas is great for a cooktop but not as useful for an oven. So typically a combination cooktop/oven will use gas but not when they are separate. Electric oven typically means 30A or 40A dedicated ...


4

The answer is yes. The tap rules do allow this and it is common in older homes to tap a duplex off the supply, conduit from the tap to the outlet box is usually required and metal flex MC /AC is normally used. The 10 foot tap rule has always been used on every example of this that I have seen. On both electric stove tops on top of the counter and single ...


4

They also make timers that don't use neutral wires. Same company, same shelf. They wire up exactly like your old switch, and are guaranteed to work anywhere a plain switch works. These have a dial you twist and set to the exact time you want, and a spring and clockwork mechanism makes them unwind. They come in any range from 5 minutes to 12 hours, with ...


4

Yes, #1 is your group of neutrals and you would need to pigtail into that connector with a piece #14. Naturally, you want to shut off the breaker before doing any work. You're going to have to be careful arranging the existing wires so you can get the new timer switch into the box, and even then, you might need to add a box extender.


3

All cables are the same exact colors: Black and white. Or sometimes, black white and red. This means colors are almost meaningless. There are three rules: a) bare and green are always ground; b) White must be neutral if present, otherwise always-hot if present; and c) if the white wire is not neutral, it must be marked with tape or paint. This is an ...


3

Mutually Incompatible Certification Schemes The primary problem with what you describe (installing a foreign-standards receptacle into a North American electrical system) is while foreign receptacles of reputable make (vs. some Cheese-pipeline special) are going to have a third-party certification, that certification is going to stem from a different ...


3

There is no listing for non-standard receptacles, so at a basic level, it would require "examination" by the AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction) in your area under NEC Article 90.7 to make sure it doesn't violate the basic "suitable for use" rules in Article 110.3. You might find an AHJ who will accept the IEC certifications as adequate, you might not, there ...


3

To add to this answer, I wouldn't just add a surface mount box, I would Cut open the wall open a bit more to remove the wire from the box (it might be stapled inside the wall) Fully patch and paint the wall Drill a hole in the ceiling directly above Surface mount conduit with the existing wire Mount your surface box Why so much effort? If they cut this ...


2

If the hole is slightly stripped, then slipping some type of material in the hole to take up space might do the trick. A small sliver of card stock or paper or a very thin strand of copper wire (thin like a thread, not thick house wiring). If that doesn't work or if the hole is actually cracked wide open, you could use glue to hold the screw in place. ...


2

You are correct in thinking to turn the breaker off. Since your place was built in 08 it will be wired to code. The new receptacles will usually have 3 different colored screws. Brass color is hot normally the black wire Silver color is neutral normally the white wire And last a green screw the equipment grounding is normally a bare copper Since you are ...


2

Okay - that is absolutely not to code and a fire/shock hazard. You show an electrical box that is partially covered over by plaster/drywall. To fix, just cut the drywall off in front of the outlet 1-gang electrical box (the blue box), pop an extender on it to bring it flush with the surface of the drywall (for example), and install the outlet back normally. ...


2

I do not think you did it correctly but I will explain. Connecting the GFCI without a switch all sounded good. But you then put the switch on the white or neutral if I understood your question. The proper wiring would be the “splice” to the switch if a piece of Romex is on the hot to the outlet , you remove the black line feeding the outlet connect that ...


2

Assuming that one cable is the incoming power and one goes out to more outlets or lights, just keep everything connected by color--blacks together and whites together. I'm a little concerned that you're doing electrical work without the skills to trace a simple circuit, though. Please be sure that you have an understanding of proper connection techniques, ...


2

No the requirement is 6” from the back of the box , no tape measure a dollar bill will , if you only have a 20 I will trade you for a dollar and you will be good,,, ok that has only almost worked once LOL. My first job as a licensed electrician my dad said I will save you thousands and went back and clipped all my wires on the rough in , the inspector knew ...


1

This is a multi-wire branch circuit aka MWBC. This is a special arrangement for delivering two circuits' worth of power onto a single cable with only 1 more copper wire, because it is putting two opposite-pole subcircuits arranged so the neutral only carries differential current. It's quite wire-efficient, but yours was installed quite improperly. They ...


1

The weak link in the grounding may be the cover. Your fully-raised cover only contacts the (grounded) box at the edges and through the screws. A proper ground requires a cover with flattened corners, to make solid contact with the corners of the junction box. The flat contact between the receptacle's strap and the cover completes the ground path.


1

Doesn't sound like this will be possible. What you have now in the switch box is just a switch loop--hot in and hot out. There's no neutral return path, which would be required for your light. If you were to connect your light to what's there it would probably work, but everything that gets plugged into the outlet thereafter would have its supply voltage ...


1

Given that the box is plastic, you have at least 3 options: Try a slightly larger screw. Fill the mounting hole(s) in the box with epoxy, drill a new hole, and re-mount the outlet Replace the box. If it were me, I would do number 3. Obviously, make sure the electricity to the outlet is turned off before doing any work. Edit 1 : OP says the box is metal. ...


1

Thinking a bit outside the box, this is between a corner and a fireplace, so would you be able to add some fixed permanent or built-in shelving in this little corner? That way you could bring the new socket out and install it permanently in the framing for your new shelf ? but with the power socket in the white backplate? Or if that's a bit ambitious, ...


1

You don't need to swap breakers, just swap the wires on the breakers. If the problem changes breakers, then I'd take a closer look at the first outlet on the chain. Backstab wiring is basically un-inspectable, unless a wire is bared too far (bare copper visible ); that can catch a ground wire. Also, where backstabs are used, screws are often left "high" ...


1

Swapping breakers as a test to see if the breaker is working is a good idea. If both breakers trip then the only real method you have at hand is to isolated and find the area in the circuit where you are having a problem. Isolation is the key. First disconnect the breaker and see if it will rest with no conductors connected. If it does then your problem is ...


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