53

After writing out the question, I realized I had forgotten to check something. I went back to the panel to see if any other breakers besides the dryer circuit had flipped off, and sure enough, the "garage light" breaker had been tripped. After testing more, I determined that the smoke detectors are actually on the "garage light" circuit ...


34

Could be an unmarked Multi-Wire Branch Circuit We often look at people's panels for other reasons, and we often say "hey, see the red+black wires from the same cable, going to 2 independent breakers? Those need a handle-tie. So when you shut one off for maintenance, they both shut off". And people say "thanks" but think "why ...


16

Those hangers will stick out and potentially catch on clothing. I would use saddles.


13

Oh boy...whoever did that work really botched it up good You need to call whoever rearranged those breakers back and tell them to fix their messed-up work on their dime, or better yet, pay someone competent of your choice to fix their errors. What they did took a perfectly fine panel configuration with spare slots in it and likely damaged it, atop ...


12

The clearance requirement is almost definitely going to be an issue. (And not an unusual issue - I will have the same problem if/when I ever upgrade my panel and get it inspected.) The shelves should be OK because you have room to the left. But the washer/dryer (whichever one is closer to the panel) is a definite problem. If there is any way to move it (but ...


12

Allow me to color in ThreePhaseEel's superb answer. First, you need to understand how panel busing works. Check that link for the basics, however, the tandem/quadplex concept does not apply to GE -- the water heater breaker is NOT a tandem (note the handles are not independent!) Effectively, GE gives you 1/2" wide breakers and you "build your own&...


10

For EMT (anyway) the spacing is pretty clear - I can't recall if it's the same or different for other types, but it might well be the same. Within 12" of each box. 10 feet maximum spacing (1 clamp per stick of conduit, minimum.) You can do more than the minimums without an issue. You can't do less than that. So a typical 20 foot run would need at least ...


7

You need 3/0 not 2/0 for running this in copper Since this is a garage you're feeding and not a house, you can't use the "83% rule" (aka Table 310.12 in the current Code), as that rerate only applies to feeders or services serving entire dwelling units. As a result of that, and the fact that a 2/0 copper wire is rated for 175A (a standard breaker ...


6

The moment you put any wires in that pipe, you must put a lid on the box. This is mandatory! The lid can either be a blank (they're like 20 cents), or can have a cutout for a socket aka receptacle. For instance if you are connecting the EVSE with a cord and plug, you would choose a lid that has a cutout for the socket that you need. Or, if you are ...


6

You don’t use any strain relief. Wires are supposed to be able to slide completely freely through conduit. You terminate the wires inside the junction boxes, of course, and they don’t move around when you’re not working on the wiring. Any strain happens to the device cord, which is designed for movement.


6

No way! That panel won't pass any competent electrical inspection, mostly because the NEC 110.26(A) clear working space has clearly been infringed by the washer/dryer combination. Not your fault, I know, but as long as that trash? can to the left can find another home, it should be possible to move it one stud bay to the left with the aid of some junction ...


6

You're thinking about it upside-down. Your logic is start with a 400A panel, and then what can you put on it? Actually it works the other way round. You start with the characteristics of your house, and major appliances... and punch that into a residential load calculation. The load calculation takes into account continuous use, equipment's ability to ...


6

A feeder is breaker and wiring that supplies a subpanel. A branch circuit is breaker and wiring that supplies various outlets, including receptacle outlets. "Outlets" does include hardwired loads, or as they like to call them, "utilization equipment". Wiring can be one or the other, not both. You cannot have outlets on a feeder. So no. ...


6

Is feeding a 200A sub from a 200A main legit? Yes, and you don't even need another 200A breaker. The 200A breaker alread present in the panel will suffice, and so you can use a subfeed lug kit as DrSparks advises. For that matter, if the main breaker were out at the meter (e.g. a meter-main), you could simply "tee" off it with dual 4/0 to two main-...


5

What you're looking for is called a "ranch panel" Here is how a "Class 320" 400A ranch panel is laid out internally. The major features are: Meter 200A breaker that goes straight to thru-lugs. The units are sold with this breaker location unpopulated, so different breakers can be fitted for 300 vs 400A service. 200A breaker that goes to:...


5

This is easy to diagnose. If you are comfortable working in a live panel, take off the cover plate and remove the black wire from the troublesome breaker, to be doubly safe, you might want to turn off the main breaker first. Once you've removed the wire, turn the main breaker back on and try to reset the breaker, if it trips or won't reset it's dead. If it ...


4

I'm a big fan of that type of interlock, since it is economical and it lets you power any load in the panel, without complex wiring or the need to choose 6 circuits in advance. "Remove the jumper and un-bond your generator's neutral" Correct. "Do NOT un-bond your generator and leave it as is, it will be fine with both bonded neutrals ...


4

Install it properly with clean metal-metal contact. Don't just hand-spin the conduit nuts, get a screwdriver and hammer and tighten them by putting the screwdriver on the serrations made for that purpose and tapping. On the conduit compression fittings, tighten those with a wrench. On setscrew fittings, tighten the setscrews with a tool. Since metallic ...


4

The feeder needs to be correctly breakered at the supply end. That is 2 AWG (33.6 mm2) aluminum AA-8000 feeder. It is only good for 90 amps.* If the supply breaker is 100A, that's a common blunder due to misreading NEC. Change the breaker to 90A. Determining whether you have the amps to spare And adding a 20A to this subpanel is fine given that it's ...


4

They know not what they did! So this is an outdoor-rated "NEMA 3R" panel. You notice there's a very particular "dance" that the swinging door cover does in order to latch in and provide watertightness. As such, the deadfront cover has a very specific correct orientation. Therefore my original theory - that they put the deadfront on ...


3

Will the 125Amp panel suffice? (I didn’t go with a 200amp panel because of the cost of the feeder breaker) The subpanel rating is a redline, a maximum - like your car's 112 mph rated tires. There is no need to match the subpanel redline rating to the supply breaker. So feel free to use a 225A-bussed subpanel downline of a 125A, 100A, 90A or even 60A ...


3

I'd just add an extra outlet to the 120V circuit that's already required in the laundry area Instead of jumping thru hoops to try to wedge a subpanel into the laundry area (which is what you'd have to do to make your proposal Code-legal), I'd simply run a short length of Wiremold from the existing washing machine outlet to a surface box behind the dryer and ...


3

Yes, that's fine. If the panel manufacturer supports double-lugs for the output lugs you could use those. Otherwise, use 3-port Polaris splices to fork the wires. Note this all needs to happen inside the enclosure, and the enclosure needs to be big enough. You would need 4/0 Al wire for the feeder. (Normally you would need 250 kcmil, the next size up; ...


3

The question is different but the answer is exactly the same. This breaker does not provide any location to attach the wires from the SPD. The only difference is this is a discrete main breaker, not a meter-main, so it will be a great deal easier exchanging this unit for one that does what you want. That being a main-breaker service panel with thru lugs (...


3

First of all, a dryer receptacle is rated 30 amps, not 40, so if it's on a 40 amp breaker, you're already in violation. If you truly have a 40 amp circuit (#8 copper wire minimum) the you're ok for the wires being on a 40 amp breaker but not the receptacle. If you have #10 copper on a 40 amp breaker then you are overfused. Either way, there is nothing wrong ...


3

The datasheet for your panel says it is a 6 slot, 12 circuit panel, which means it should be compatible with tandem breakers. A tandem breaker is two small breakers that take up the same slot as one full sized breaker. But you have all double-pole breakers... Well, they make a solution for that too which is two tandem breakers joined together. The middle ...


3

First, I would like you to consider using aluminum wiring instead of copper. The cost difference is staggering and there's no measurable disadvantage to using aluminum if it's installed properly. If you're dead set on copper, #3 THHN is fine. You'll need 1-1/4 SCH 80 PVC for areas exposed to damage. In particular, this is generally where the conduit exits ...


2

You need a different transfer switch Not only does your current transfer switch require a degree of finagling to work with multi-wire branch circuits, it can't be used with your generator even when MWBCs aren't an issue! This is because "select circuit" transfer switches only have a single neutral connection lead and no neutral switching, but your ...


2

The #1 non-safety mistake novices make it chintzing out on the subpanel, and not getting enough spaces for future needs. Then later they want to add a circuit and their panel is full. 24 spaces is not excessive for a craftsman. 240V tools happen, and you want to be able to power them. The #2 mistake is using copper wire unnecessarily for feeder. Aluminum ...


2

It's most likely to be an induction motor. Its speed depends on the frequency of the AC supply, not the voltage. To reduce its speed you'll need a lower frequency. A variable frequency drive is the "normal" way of achieving that, but you might be able to hack it by, for example, adjusting the governor on a portable electric generator to reduce ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible