8

Yes, just be sure to run a 4 wire circuit (2 hots, neutral and ground), if the current garage is attached you don't need extra ground rods. In fact, since you are planning for the future, you might install a sub-panel now that would supply your EVSE outlet as well as other circuits in the future. As many others have said here, go bigger than you expect to ...


8

The feed for your sub panel comes from your main panel the grounded conductor neutral and grounding conductor equipment ground are connected in the main panel so measuring continuity in a sub is normal even when the grounded conductor is isolated from the box and the grounding conductor. This is normal the resistance value is usually quite low just a couple ...


7

Your building is most likely wired using armored cable (Type AC), so it's grounded, alright Given the presence of per-conductor paper packing protruding into the panel through the cable connectors, the lack of cable jacketing protruding into the panel through the same route, the lack of ground wires, the vintage of the panel and apparent vintage of the ...


6

While we're discussing bad technique, let me hit the awful practice of "Mister Snippy", snipping the wires short so they can only reach the breaker they're on right now (or the neutral bar). Mr. Snippy thinks he's impressing the inspector with wild overinterpretation of NEC 110.12. Actually they're dooming the panel to a bad hair day of wire nut ...


6

Current on the ground wire This is a very serious matter that HAS to be found. To start with, we need to know that the panel is isolating the neutral and ground bars. Lift all your neutrals including the feeder (remove them from the bar) and then use a plain ohmmeter to check between the neutral bar and the ground bar. That must be infinity ohms. If not ...


4

If i assume correctly you do not have a 220v outlet for your electric drier. The most economical thing to do is Sell the electric drier and buy a gas drier. You may loose a little money selling it but it will likely be more of a loss/expense to pay to have a new outlet installed. The gas drier is (probably) going to have a lower energy cost to operate and ...


4

Yes: Accessibility and working space. You need a zone 30" wide x 36" tall x 78" high in front of the panel, so the electrician can stand and work on the panel. This space must be clear at all times; it cannot be blocked by anything. Ingress to the space must also be clear. Why is this required? Because quite often, when a person is being ...


3

Edit: THIS. Over-full panels invite problems! Go look at this situation and the poster's proposed solution. This person wants to add a subpanel. What they really want is a 125A subpanel, which should be easy. But they're willing to settle for a 50A subpanel since they feel forced into using a double-stuff breaker, and they're very comfortable using a 30/...


2

This might be "phantom voltage" - i.e., voltage read when the circuit is effectively dead. Or it could be something else. Troubleshooting process is to start at the beginning - the breaker - and work your way out. You could have a bad breaker, but normally breakers will either fail off (in which case there is no real danger, but the circuit will be ...


2

(I should have answered this last year when I actually solved the problem.) My solution was a small piece of stick on velcro that secured the door when it was closed, and then released the door with a small tug. As it was placed on the inside of the door it was not noticeable when the door was closed, and it was also thin enough that the door looked ...


2

They are not unsafe. BUT If you pick up the tandem breaker and a full size breaker and look at the area that plugs into the bus of the panel and if you take a good look at the panel itself, you will see that there is a lot less area that makes contact between the tandem and the panel bus. In fact about half the area. If the circuit is a heavily used circuit ...


2

No, you're interpreting the Code correctly Table 250.122 in the NEC is what governs equipment grounding conductors, and for a feeder with a 200A maximum breaker ahead of it, it requires a 6AWG copper wire, which is what you are installing. This is because the grounding conductor only has to carry current long enough for the breaker to trip; in normal ...


2

You could install a main breaker (what you're calling a main shutoff) but that REALLY shouldn't be done live, by anyone. You'd have to lift your feeders and land them on the new main breaker terminals. When the disconnect is not where you can keep an eye on it while you're working, like in your building, it should be lockable. If the disconnect has a one-...


2

More than likely, you'll need a permit. The power company will have to disconnect the power for the panel change out and in most cases won't reconnect when the job's done unless they get an OK from the local AHJ. I've known local electricians that have pulled the meters without power company notice and have done the work. The problem is with the smart meters,...


2

You need to read the specifications for your panel. Almost all panels have a bus stab limit that is lower than the total panel capacity. Not all stabs are created equal -- the panel might allow higher-amperage breakers at the top or on one side. Here's a picture from my last home. Note my 200A panel allows 100A circuits on the left but only 70A circuits ...


2

You should be OK. The ampacity of the 8 ga is 40 amps, but who ever installed it was considering voltage drop over that long a run and used 8ga. A wise precaution and someone who actually followed installation specs...nice! The ampacity of 10ga is 30 amps and such a short run between the generator and xfer switch won't have any appreciable voltage drop. Most ...


1

Start by changing the electric meter from a "plain meter" to a "Meter-Main". The meter-main combines both a meter and a main breaker, and provides an outside disconnect. This is required by the upcoming NEC 2020 anyway. The real gain of a meter-main is you can de-energize your entire service panel for maintenance without having to deal ...


1

While I'd normally recommend having your standby loads on a subpanel... My normal recommendation to folks who want a backup generator, whether portable or permanent, is to move their standby loads into a subpanel. This is how the "big boys" do it, as it provides a built-in level of protection against generator overload from large/unnecessary loads ...


1

The THP108 PowerBack audible alert might fit your need. It is a battery-powered alarm which detects mains power via an antenna wrapped around one of the supply conductors (upstream of the main/interlocked breaker). There's no electrical connection to the conductors. I don't have this device (yet?), but from what I can tell, a person switches this thing on ...


1

Conduit Is there any way you can move that east-west pipe north two grids (I'm assuming up is north) so it hugs the house? That would reduce you to three 90s including the stub-ups. You need Schedule 80 PVC for the stub-ups at both ends (bottom of vertical curve to conduit body). Expansion joints, I just don't glue my PVC conduit except where I need to, e....


1

The trick is adding up the loads not the breakers you might have close to 200 double pole amps on a 125 amp panel and it could be ok but the size of the loads and the diversity of loads like heating / cooling all come into play but if you are putting in a new panel go big they don’t cost that much more.


1

This is how the panels ended up after some work this weekend. Cleaned up the breakers that dont belong in the Murray Panels. Upgraded the feeds and feeder breaker to the pool pump sub panel (Primarily to upgrade the panel in the future if needed.) ]1 Pool / EV Charger Sub Panel


1

The good news: you only have a few things to clean up in your panels The good news in your situation is that your "alien breaker" problem is less severe than it appears at first glance; while your panels are Arrow-Hart (Murray), they are cross-labeled to accept Bryant (now Eaton) BR, Westinghouse (now Eaton) (H)QP, and ITE EQ-P (apparently now ...


1

Option 2 is probably not an option at all - that setup is almost always for a special-rate storage electric water heating tariff and is only on for a few hours when demand is low overnight (which is why it's a special lower rate) or else it's switched off whenever loads are high (a different scheme, similar concept.) For my utility, you can keep them if you ...


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