13

You are correct in addressing this, but the ring terminal isn't the right tool for the job You are indeed correct that 14AWG is well outside the listed/labeled range of the lugs on a 50A Siemens QP breaker -- they're rated for 8AWG through 4AWG wire only. However, nobody's tested them with ring tongue terminals either, so your ring terminal solution is off ...


7

When you pull the trigger of the saw, the motor winding looks like nearly a dead short (maybe 0.6 ohms) for a few AC line cycles. Until the motor spins up and/or heats up, the current is primarily limited only by series resistance in the building wiring and the motor windings. During motor start, the type and length of wire makes a huge difference. You ...


6

If the wiring is 12 awg it is safe. I caution folks that want to upsize parts to check the wiring because sometimes a breaker was upsized to prevent un wanted tripping. A 20 amp GFCI really doesn't provide any thing that a 15 amp will except the ability to plug in a 20 amp device. When was the last time you saw a 20 amp plug on an appliance? They are out ...


5

Having had to rewire a factory after someone stole all the breakers and all the wires up to the edge of a panel, I see it in the converse manner as ThreePhaseEel. I don't say red and blue need to be on different neutrals. I say red and blue breakers need to be on opposite phases. I.E. the breakers are mispositioned. I wouldn't do anything to the garage ...


4

Most likely, the neutral wire connection failed because the wire was not properly torqued down. Even experienced electricians cannot set a torque any more reliably then their spouses - that's been tested. It's why Code now requires use of torque screwdrivers. The connection got hot, passing heat down the circuit neutral (copper is a very good thermal ...


4

Could be an overload This is a 240V (2-pole) breaker. Given the 20A size, it is perfectly legal for it to feed both 120V and 240V loads, and I suspect the pool pump is a 240V load. A 20A 240V/2-pole breaker has two poles (legs) of 20A each. A 120V load can draw off one leg and neutral, and it will draw the amps it says. A 240V load will draw off both legs at ...


4

Get a three to two prong adapter and run a wire from an actual ground to the little tab, then use your button tester.


4

Why not swap breakers 20 and 22 to see if the problem moves with the breaker? Shut off the main breaker and remove the panel cover. You can disconnect and swap the wires from the two breakers without moving the breakers. You should replace the panel cover as your test is going to take several days. If breaker #19301 trips in position 20 then it is obviously ...


3

You're correct that red and blue need to be on different neutrals You are correct that the original wiring was wrong; having red and blue share a neutral would subject that neutral wire to the sum of the currents from the red and blue wires as they're on the same leg of the service. Which wire you pick to go with the purple wire depends on the position of ...


3

The AFCI breaker is probably toast you said you had no lights on the original GFCI or a replacement. If you don’t have a meter try swapping the load from the first kitchen outlets to the second (both breakers off move the wires at the breakers and turn back on). if the problem moves you have a bad breaker. If the problem stays the same there is a fault in ...


2

after a few tips from @ThreePhaseEel I be able to fix the problem that I'm having. after I short the circle on a furnace and blow off the fuse. Since I'm not a AC tech so I don't know much about a ac or a heat pump. beside the unit outside that they need a furnace unit inside as well. so the problem that I'm having with out knowing that so I'm not be able to ...


2

I took the other advice here and did the following: Used a multi-meter to test for 120v at the AFCI breaker. It was showing 120v. Swapped the AFCI breaker with the one right next to it to double check that the AFCI is working. It was. Got out my non-contact tester and started to remove each outlet and test the wiring. After the third outlet I finally ...


2

OK, so you have to follow the chain. And if necessary, remove things from the chain to eliminate them as suspects. First, the AFCI breaker. Turning the breaker OFF and hitting "test" is improper test procedure. Read the documentation (it's online) but you need to turn the breaker ON. After it holds and stays ON, then it becomes possible to use ...


2

I suspect part of the problem may be AFCI, GFCI and other recent advancements. A simple panel is totally passive - as long as there are no loose connections causing sparks/arcs, and actual breaker trips are not very frequent, there is little to wear out. However, code has changed over the last few decades to mandate AFCI and GFCI protection. Breakers which ...


2

Sounds a lot like my house before I redid my kitchen. Current code requires at least two 20A circuits in the kitchen, for exactly the reasons you stated. My kitchen used to be almost all on one circuit (except the oven & cooktop). I also have one 15A circuit that powers: kitchen lights, cooktop hood fan/light, 1/2 the bedroom lights & receptacles ...


2

Your planning is a bit...off Thailand, like most places in the world that aren't in North America, uses IEC style nomenclature and wiring, from what I can tell (the actual standards aren't available in English, but the two threads I found on the topic on a Thai expat forum are thoroughly steeped in IEC terminology, such as RCD/RCBO, metric wire sizing, 400Y/...


2

First that is a 20 amp circuit it could be 240v but sounds like 2 each 20 amp 120v circuits that are both protected by a 20 amp breaker (not the same as 40 amp). That is a GFCI breaker (I can just barely read ground fault on the tag) . Having multiple loads like the washer and pool pump suggest it is a multiwire branch circuit. Multi-wire branch circuits ...


2

"I have a question: does this white double pole breaker offer 20A or 40A (20A+20A as labeled) in total?" 20A - At 240V. If your washer draws 20A and your pool pump draws 10A, hardly surprising it would blow, since that would be 30A draw. So it would be reasonable to expect it to blow any time both are on at once, or at least any point in the wash ...


2

Sadly, there just isn't much data to go on Unfortunately, very little is known about the behavior of Wadsworth breakers; the original manufacturer is nothing more than a brand name that's been tossed about the industry a few times since they stopped being a going manufacturing concern, and while there are replacements out there, there is basically no ...


1

Look at your bus stab for notches. You cannot put tandem breakers anywhere except where it's allowed by the panel labeling. Fitting them where they aren't allowed generally means putting more breakers in the panel than it was designed, tested or approved for. Eaton often does not specify which spaces are allowed for tandems. They instruct you to look at ...


1

You don't want to short out a circuit to test a breaker. I have tested breakers simply by overloading the circuit with a 1500 watt construction light and a few 1200 watt hair dryers, depending on the breaker size. This worked pretty well for the 15 and 20 amp breakers. Just about all of the breakers I've encountered that were bad either tripped with little ...


1

Now we know the power is good at the breaker. Trace the black wire back to where it comes in the panel. Follow the white wire that the black comes in with to the grounded buss make sure the wire is not broken and is connected to the buss. Next go to the first receptacle pull it out. Check for voltage, that wire splice looks small to me like 14 awg if back ...


1

If what you say is true, that the entire kitchen runs off of only one 15 amp circuit breaker, then you are limited to 15 amp no matter how many different outlets you use in the kitchen. However, you probably should try to confirm that. Turn the breaker off and check that every outlet in the kitchen is off.


1

On the SquareD website (here in year 2021) you can search for residential circuit breakers. Then select the QO line. Then select the category HM (High Magnetic) which is essentially a "slow blow". If you select one of the breakers shown, like the QO120HM, there will be PDF's to download. The one labeled "Square D QO and QOB Miniature ...


1

It's possible that code might require this to be an AFCI/GFCI breaker, so you might be violating code if you do this, fair warning. With that said, the black wire is the hot wire, which should go to the new breaker. The white wire is the neutral, which should go to your neutral bus. Your question itself shows that you only have a passing familiarity with ...


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