13

I can't figure out the problem yet. Here's what I do know. And I have to save it because I can't visit chat without losing this. So even though this isn't an answer answer, I find when troubleshooting problem A, if there are unresolved issues B, C and D out there also, they complicate things in unexpected ways, making it much more difficult to be sure ...


12

Why 30A service? Because of provisioning. They are not able to provision 50A service at this time at this location. That is probably due to transformer or pole-line wire capacity in the neighborhood. Giving everyone 50/60A service means they would be oversubscribing their transformers and pole lines. This would necessitate a big capital expense ...


12

Eaton has two breaker lines: the residential grade (cheap) one, BR the industrial grade (good) one, CH. This is CH. It is an excellent panel. Hold onto it! BR will be placed more up-front because it's more popular. If you stop there and give up, that's the trouble. Most likely the store also carries CH. Look for it: the narrow package and ...


7

Here's what you're supposed to have. Live to neutral: some value of resistance depending on your load. Don't be surprised if the figure doesn't strictly follow Ohm's Law; many devices have their effective resistance change after they warm up. If there are no loads on the circuit, hot-neutral should be infinity ohms. Live to ground/earth: this should ...


5

But they're not individual 120V circuits! They are combined into pairs, as something called a multi-wire branch circuit. These share a neutral, so they're not separate at all. The handle-ties exist for a bunch of reasons. They must be on different poles/phases Top of the hitlist is to force them into different poles or phases, i.e. To keep someone ...


5

I'm assuming you made your measurements with nothing connected to the affected outlet. In that case there is a fault somewhere on that circuit and the Live-Neutral reading shows that. The next step is to remove the outlet itself from the load-end of the circuit and see if anything changes. If so, you should replace the outlet itself. If not, then the ...


5

Harper is absolutely correct that all junctions must be in a readily accessible box. This is both for safety and maintenance reasons - a junction hidden in a wall is both a fire hazard and potentially a headache for any potential future rewiring. The 6ft distance between receptacles is also required by code, but would only cause a fire hazard if it lead to a ...


4

Your utility would violating Code up here in the USA While the US National Electrical Code does not apply to utility wiring or operations for the most part (these fall under the US National Electrical Safety Code, or NESC, instead), the NEC does contain requirements for electrical service sizing, and your utility does not follow them for their split-phase (...


4

It's to make what are called "quad" breakers, where you have two twins side-by-side, creating 2 two-pole breakers out of 2 slots instead of 4 (or, as in the photo below, one 2 pole + two 1 pole). YOU cannot do this on you own, you would have to buy them AS quad breakers, but when they make the twins, they make them all the same.


4

You need to tie breakers together in certain scenarios. One common scenario was 15 amp kitchen plugs in certain jurisdictions where on a single device you have severed the outlet tie and have two circuits powering the single device. When working on the outlet you want to flip the breaker and not be able to have half of the device live.


4

The question isn't whether the breakers are able to accept a connecting pin. The question is whether the manufacturer makes a UL-listed handle tie for those pins. I would bet they do not. There might be a reason to handle-tie the inner breakers of two adjacent duplex breakers; i.e. In an A1 A2 B1 B2 arrangement, tying A2 to B1. That would be for the ...


3

if you put it next to another similar breaker you can have a 240V circuit where they abut. That is, you can join one handle to the neighbor breakers handle to make a two pole breaker


3

An AFCI is more a protection from "fire issues" than anything you'd typically associate with "having electrical issues." NEC allows use of NM cable in residences. NM cable is sadly prone to being gnawed at by rodents, and rodents are sadly prone to be in houses, even nice ones. Some folks estimate that a human is rarely more than 15 feet from some form of ...


3

You've told us almost nothing about your house, and it's possible you wouldn't even know how to tell us what he is seeing. On the one hand, there are certain reasons why such breakers can be a very good idea. One thought that pops into my head is aluminum small-branch-circuit wiring, which was supposedly used on into the 1980s. On the other hand, there ...


3

Harper and others made important points regarding the manner of work...there are reasons professional electricians spend years studying rules, and for those rules in the first place. Note the afci breakers in the panel...if the one that tripped is one of those, it could be that arcing on a near by breaker has "fooled" it into tripping. This was an ...


3

Handle ties are used to tie together 2 like-rated 120V breakers, one on each phase of your panel, to control a 240V circuit. A 240V appliance will not operate correctly if only one phase is connected. The wiring is set up so that the tied-together breakers serve a 240V circuit. (2 hot lines, each on separate phases, and a common neutral.) If you're posting "...


3

You can normally connect 2 ovens on 1 breaker per the NEC but the manufacturer instructions over ride the NEC per 110.4.B , listed or labeled equipment shall be installed in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling. This means you have to follow the manufacturers instructions. I agree with @JReaf that the control cycling of the ...


2

AFCI is a safety device that is designed to protect circuits from setting your house on fire. You are talking about defeating a safety system because a) it's annoying and b) you have no earthly idea what to do about it. Let's fix b). It is called an Arc Fault Circuit Interruptor "Circuit interruptor" is the technical term for "be annoying". "Arc Fault" ...


2

Haven't heard back from you, so here goes. About the panel/breakers This thing you have is a meter-main with 12 breaker spaces. The main is "backfed" meaning the main breaker is just one of the breakers. The Challenger breakers are known to be defective. And because of that, many electricians treat Challenger panels as if they're defective. They're ...


2

AFCI and GFCI protect different problems. Broadly speaking, AFCI is for fire protection from faulty connections or punctured cables and GFCI is for life-safety protection from ground faults. Personally, I would consider GFCI the bigger issue as it primarily protects from problems in devices (typically small appliances) which can happen to anyone at any time. ...


2

You need to measure the resistance of the wiring with the breaker disconnected, not just open. You normally use an insulation tester or megger for this. The values should be in the 10's of megaohms at least. If the insulation measures OK, replace the breaker.


1

Surely, the RCBO detected the thing it's there to detect. One must now confront the sobering reality of either a wiring-fault bug hunt, or that a beloved appliance in fact needs a trip to the shop (or crusher). The first thing you should do is relocate the A/C (electrically) to a different RCBO device. Either the problem moves with the A/C (in which ...


1

Some possible bad news here. Air conditioning systems have a sealed compressor, the oil and Freon (or refrigerant) is in a sealed loop, one common failure mode is some moisture gets in the system and mixes with the oil, then the mix becomes acidic and etches the varnish off the motor windings, causing small ground faults at first and later full blown shorts ...


1

This is OK, as the manufacturer has a specific part for this job Handle-tying the two inner half-breakers in a pair of (modern style) QO tandem breakers is legal, no different than handle-tying two full-size breakers save for a change in part number: instead of a QO1HT (the normal QO handle tie), you need a QOTHT instead (image from Square-D's product page):...


1

By permissible I mean: strictly allowed by the manufacturer & therefore to code. Code has no problem with handle-tying. The issue is whether the manufacturer will offer it and will UL list it. Those two processes do the vetting as to whether it is safe. (I'm sure you could rig something up but if you want to do it by the book & know that it ...


1

The information I have been able to find seems inconsistent / incomplete. For QO breakers there is a handle tie from the manufacturer (Square D / Schneider Electric), which is part QO1HT. However the documentation is sparse and doesn't state which specific breakers this is meant for. I was expecting an exact listing, much like you would see for a panel ...


1

That looks to be a Siemens load center into which someone has plugged in a single Square D Homeline breaker. Physically they fit, but it is unlikely that the Sq. D breaker is listed to be used in a Siemens panel and I guarantee the Siemens panel is not listed for using Square D breakers. But that's not what you asked... As to the tandems issue, Siemens ...


1

All we can see is QP and hom breakers we need to see the texts printed on the panel to provide help. The breakers need to be listed for the panel. , since this information is lacking a code compliant recommendation is impossible. Square D panel has Non CTL breakers and double stuff breakers but we need to know the type of panel to suggest a code compliant ...


1

I have seen this issue where the 1st circuit breaker was less sensitive than the 2nd breaker. Having said that, your 'splicing' looks messy, especially it looks like you have bundled the ground(earth) with the other two lines. Also check if you have swapped the Line and Neutral, etc. Are your breakers 'earth leakage' or 'current activated'? Earth leakage ...


1

Yes, I'm making a second answer. Why? Because today I needed to shut off a circuit in an old stab-lok control center. I flipped the breaker and fortunately I checked. It did not actually turn off. I fiddled a bit, it disconnected, I bumped the wire with my screwdriver, it came back on. I sort of shook the breaker into submission and it finally seemed to ...


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