15

Just wire it up. There is no problem using a sub panel that can take more current than you will ever feed it. Points to note: The cable to your hot tub will be rated for 50A (not 100A); therefore you must not upgrade the breaker in your main panel to 100A. It would be sensible to add a note near the main panel that the cable is only rated for 50A, so not ...


10

It's a rating. Like tires. Go shopping for tires. Almost any tire these days is rated 112 mph. *You're allowed to drive 65 on those, it is saying don't exceed 112 mph*. It's the same with subpanels: The "100A" is a maximum rating. Do not exceed 100A. However, you certainly should exceed your feed-breaker size of 50A. Even if 50A panels existed, ...


6

No! The wire is (almost certainly) only rated for 20A. If the breaker is tripping because more than 20A is flowing, then uprating the breaker will mean more than 20A flows through the wires, your wires heat up, and your house burns down. (If the breaker is tripping because it's a GFCI breaker and there is a ground fault, then a 30A GFCI breaker will also ...


5

Yes. The panel's labeling means exactly what you think it means, that breaker slot 5-6 and all above it are limited to 70A breakers max. That 100A breaker should be moved down to the bottom slot. Additionally, that top breaker is being backfed by your solar setup, correct? In that case, it needs to be bolted down -- that's a code requirement whenever a ...


4

There doesn't appear to be an electrical junction box in there so no, it's not safe. You will need to add junction boxes and use appropriate connectors for the cables into the boxes and then cover with cover plates. The boxes will have to remain accessible. Or You can work backwards from here and find the connection points for these cables and disconnect ...


4

Type B only affects the magnetic-trip overcurrent portion of the breaker, designed for detecting short circuits. It doesn't affect the RCD part of the RCBO, or the thermal part of the MCB. Using Type C breakers is fine unless you have such a long run of thin cable that there isn't enough fault current available to trip it at the far end. Hong Kong codes ...


3

Wow, that much weather damage already to the labeling. Is this door being left open, or did Square D really oversell the NEMA 3R claim? Yes, I agree. This is a special panel specifically for solar. The solar breaker (up top) is bot part of the main bus, and gets its own connection hot-off-the-meter, as does the (notably, factory paralleled) main breaker. ...


3

Using a larger sub panel will not be a problem but the breaker must stay a 50 AMP in the main panel. You can utilize the 50 Amp breaker in the hot tub panel as a connection point for the new wire run or just use that junction as a splice point. If you do that, I don't think you can double lug the wires and would have to use split-bolt connectors (buy a lot ...


3

Aside from what Jack says, and even if this was inside a junction box, those wire nuts are wholly inadequate to insulate the wires. Wire nuts are not listed to cap a single wire, and will easily fall off. Ordinarily I would say you need to double them back over and tape them firmly to the (individual) wire so they can't fall off, but you have left yourself ...


3

Either remove the wires entirely, or if it is impossible to do so, remove as much of the cables at most ends obliterate the cables at both ends so they are entirely orphaned in the wall. Don't get your cables mixed up! Then, remove the old junction box entirely. Gone.


2

Don't bother calling an electrician. You'll pay $200 for a lecture. You've been putting yourself and your wife in danger for quite some time. You're really playing with fire with that dryer socket The NEMA 10 is an obsolete, dangerous and illegal (for work since 1989?) dryer socket. It is widely understood that it is fragile, and is not intended for ...


2

The reason that certain sized wire must be used for a given amperage is because the wire gets hot when electricity is pulled through it. That said, some equipment from China isn't known for complying to all the regulations we have, and the conductors in the adapters could be undersized. Many conductors and connectors are rated for 75C, which is 167F, and ...


2

As a tap to a second building with no sub panel NO It would not be legal. The term tap usually means connecting a smaller conductor to a larger feeder and there are some cases where a tap is legal but not here with the info provided. Maybe it’s legal if this is spliced not tapped if the breaker feeding the 8-3 is 20 amp it probably is ok (they may have ...


2

50A is not a standard panel size, you will find a few more options if you search 60A. You can use a panel rated for higher than the feeder, the panel rating is the maximum current allowed. You may wan't to consider checking your wire size, the instructions for the last hot tub I installed specified #6 wire, most of the time #6 can be protected at 60A. (...


2

The manual says 25 AMP and 10 AWG


2

When the current is high with no load, check for proper voltage. The “Rule of Thumb” is Low Voltage = High Amps. If voltage is correct at the feed, check all connections to the motor leads. Check all connections in disconnect, motor operator, distribution panel, etc. If there is a loose connection, you might show a proper voltage, but when it is under a ...


1

If I am reading the question right: You tapped the switched supply of a half-switched receptacle to power a ceiling fan. When your turned the breaker back on and turned the on the switch, the breaker tripped. (There had not been any such problem before you started.) You then tried to put the wiring back the way it was before you started - as you put ...


1

The first picture is a Square D Type QO This will not interchange with any other brand but Eaton and Siemens have classified clones that will fit. Stay with the Square D. The second picture is a Cutler Hammer type CH (now called CHF). Excellent quality and no other brand will fit.


1

To answer your direct question, no, there is no way to differentiate the reason for the trip on a basic GFCI circuit breaker (regardless of the make). There is one trip mechanism and indicator, the only thing added to a GFCI breaker is an additional sensor system operating that trip mechanism.


1

You don't need to swap breakers, just swap the wires on the breakers. If the problem changes breakers, then I'd take a closer look at the first outlet on the chain. Backstab wiring is basically un-inspectable, unless a wire is bared too far (bare copper visible ); that can catch a ground wire. Also, where backstabs are used, screws are often left "high" ...


1

Swapping breakers as a test to see if the breaker is working is a good idea. If both breakers trip then the only real method you have at hand is to isolated and find the area in the circuit where you are having a problem. Isolation is the key. First disconnect the breaker and see if it will rest with no conductors connected. If it does then your problem is ...


1

A magnetic starter switch or magnetic contactor can do what you want. Most are designed for fairly heavy loads (8A and up), and they are not consumer-style plug-in devices but rather bulky boxes intended for permanently wiring. There are circuit breakers with this feature that you can mount in a panel (hopefully you have a panel type that one of these can ...


1

So I noticed on part 125 the latchboard the latch "ramps" appeared to have worn down a bit which might cause the switches to not all flip in the appropriate sequence. So I purchased and installed a replacement. When I installed the new latchboard (and new relays) I made sure the latchboard was firmly screwed to the frame. It's possible if the latchboard ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible