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Never EVER swap a breaker for a larger amp. Extremely dangerous and could easily burn your house down. If turning on a space heater trips the breaker, there are other things on the circuit drawing current and you will need to shut them off to run your heater on that same circuit. Also use the lowest wattage setting whenever possible - running 1500 watts (...


4

Looks good to me. The most important advice I think I can mention is to make sure the two pole breaker you buy for this circuit is listed for use in your panel. Many breakers fit or seem to fit), but the bus connector is slightly different and doesn't connect well resulting in connection problems and damage to the panel. If you are not sure, send a picture ...


3

No! Circuit breakers aren’t chosen arbitrarily, or for fun. They are chosen so you don’t overload the wiring and devices (switches, receptacles, etc) in the circuit. If you swap in a larger breaker you seriously risk setting your wiring on fire and burning down your house. Specifically, all - all! - the wire in a circuit would have to be 12 Ga and all the ...


3

Also check the wire connections on the breaker. That is THHN wire which has the size written right on it. It's 10 AWG which needs a little thinking about: 240.4 Protection of Conductors. Conductors, other than flexible cords, flexible cables, and fixture wires, shall be protected against overcurrent in accordance with their ampacities specified in 310.15, ...


3

Almost certainly a bad breaker. Square D Homeline is the cheaper model than the QO breakers, but you'll have to replace it with another Homeline breaker since the QO breakers won't fit in a homeline panel. BTW, I noticed that you are running 10ga wire. That isn't rated for 40 amps. And to be running 40 amps to a pump, it must be a heck of a big pump. ...


3

You can breaker down but not up, so yes, you can just replace the 60 with a 50, the wires should fit. Before you do that though, check with the installation instructions to verify what your plumber wants you to do. The instructions will specify what size breaker you need to have and changing those directions can void any warranties you might have.


3

There is no reason electrically to leave it curled up. You'll be perfectly fine straightening it out. I'm assuming this is an add on to an existing panel. If a new panel, I'd seriously consider a PON (plug on neutral) style panel. This eliminates the need for the pig tail. Last year I wired my son's new house with a SquareD PON QO panel and loved how ...


3

It can go either way. often the feed to a panel goes "backwards" through the main breaker (compared to the other breakers).


2

Probably Not Note: US-centric. Basic principles apply elsewhere but due to different implementation (e.g., whole-house RCD), this may not be the case in some places around the world. The key is that ground fault and regular breaker trip are two very different things. Regular Breaker The basic premise of a regular circuit breaker, whether a main breaker for ...


2

Since each circuit has its own yoke of receptacles, you're fine The rule that Harper's referring to is in NEC 210.7: 210.7 Multiple Branch Circuits. Where two or more branch circuits supply devices or equipment on the same yoke or mounting strap, a means to simultaneously disconnect the ungrounded supply conductors shall be provided at the point at which ...


2

Fatal flaw: You can't use extension cords coiled up! This entire product's very design is faulty. Obviously the design intent is that you furl out just as much cord as you need, and then leave the rest neatly on the spool. But you run smack into NEC 310.15(B)(3)(a): A spool counts as a raceway. That spool could potentially hold 11-20 wraps of wire. Hot ...


2

I pulled the stab back connections, pushed them in firmly, Can't do that. Backstab connections are ONE TIME use. Whatever you did to pull the wires out, that has "sprung the spring" and it no longer has the original gripping strength. It is not capable of holding the wire again. If they ever were, LOL. But this is the crux of the problem with ...


2

You found a classic case of why backstabs are considered bad news by many electricians. When you pulled the receptacles out the connection was temporarily reconnected and the lighting is working again. As we don’t know if everything was proper to start with but is functioning now I can tell you this will normally happen again and eventually burn the wire ...


2

The combination of GFCI and AFCI may sound like a good idea, but AFCI’s do not handle motor loads well and motor loads with wave shaping like variable speed on a motor load if just about to be assured of tripping a AFCI protection device. GFCI’s will usually do ok on small motor loads but I have seen them trip when the motor is turned off if there is a ...


1

Condensation Some part of the circuit - a receptacle, switch, or junction of some sort - has a very minor ground fault. It is OK when warm and dry. When the air cools at night down to the dew point, water condenses. It bridges the ground fault and enough current flows through to trip the GFCI. With one quick search, I found a current dew point in Bangkok of ...


1

Space heaters in the US are typically designed to use the full amount available on a standard 15A circuit. That is 120V x 15A x 0.8 = 1,440W. Or thereabouts. Might call it 1,500W if based on 125V. But no matter how fancy or "efficient" or "comfortable" or "environmental" or "safe" or "ceramic" or "oil ...


1

If you can live with a manual switch, a three-way switch can be wired in the hot lead as a SPDT (single pole double throw). You have to remember to switch it, however.


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You could run the power to the dishwasher and disposal through a current sensor and contacts on the sensor in series with a coil on a relay. The power to the water heater could be taped ahead of the sensor, and connected through "normally closed" contacts on the relay. When current is detected in the sensor the contacts on the sensor would close, ...


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