19

Double-stuffing has its limits In addition to any limits that your loadcenter places on the use of double-stuff breakers, there are also limitations on the breakers themselves due to the smaller effective frame sizes involved. As you have noticed, one of those limits is that double-stuff is incompatible with AF or GF functionality, or with other special ...


15

This is not necessarily a Weber product, but certainly an IEC 60269 "D type II" fuse, quite common in Europe. The "D" is short for "DIAZED", a registered trademark of Siemens AG. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEC_60269#D_type_fuses for more details. The colored button (red, blue) in the middle indicates the rated current (red = 10 amps, blue = 20 amps, ...


14

TLDR: Replace every breaker in your panel with a BR type from Bryant, Cutler Hammer or Eaton, readily available most places that sell breakers. Nothing else should be in your panel - especially not a Challenger (unless you like fires)! For the best answer ever on this subject, see here. Green highlighting added. The breakers don't actually have that. ...


9

There's no real cost savings. A double-stuff typically costs a bit more than its component breakers added up. They're harder to make, and more useful, and that's reflected in the cost. Further, some quadplexes are not common trip: The outer sets often aren't, and the inner sets sometimes aren't either. That makes them unfit for 120/240V split-phase loads ...


8

Weber DT II fuses. Sometimes called "bottle" fuses. Weber Fuse Catalog


8

Your "C" breaker can be replaced with an Eaton "BR" breaker. There are other breakers that will work but Eaton are probably more available... many home stores carry them.


5

Scrimping now will hit you in the pocketbook far harder later on Your problem is that you're so focused on pinching pennies right now that you don't realize just how much undoing and redoing your work later when you inevitably run out of room (either amps or spaces) will cost you. Most of the cost in running power to an outbuilding is in trenching, so it's ...


5

It sounds like the element in the lamp welded and caused a dead short. With the switch off it worked the first time but the second time the switch welded. It happens. Time to replace the switch


4

Abducted by alien breakers Someone (Bruce Banner?) tried to fit incompatible breakers such as GE THQP215 or a double-stuff Murray MP2020U. Breakers that Just Don't Belong in this panel. When the breaker didn't fit, that person just "made it fit". And bent the bus stabs all to heck. You've circled the faults, but I would pop the other breakers and check ...


4

You can use either or both halves as separate single pole circuits as long as the amperage rating is correct for the wire size and receptacle type.


3

A GFCI is a safety alarm, which detects problems in other devices. Its one job is to trip when another appliance has a problem. It is testing all the appliances all the time. If an appliance has a problem, it will not reset. That is its job. I imagine with this GFCI tripped, a bunch of sockets are dead. Unplug everything in those sockets. Now go ...


3

With only 5v on the bottom breaker I would turn them off and then pull the breaker and look at the buss terminals. Are they bright and shiny, or possibly melted away? Inspect the breakers also; if no damage is found with the breaker out of the panel, close it and measure the resistance from where the wires connect to the back of the breaker. This should be ...


3

It's the neutrals you need to firewall GFCI and DFCI devices simply do not care about ground. (Note how a GFCI breaker has no ground connection -- it has line-hot, line-neutral, load-hot, and load-neutral, and that's all!) In fact, one could pull two hots and two neutrals through an EMT conduit to a metal box, thus having a single ground path all the way ...


2

Yes this is normal. Under the 16th edition IEEE wiring regulations (introduced in 1991, superseeded in 2008, there were amendments, but I don't think any of them are relavent here) in TN installations* RCD protection in normal domestic situations was only required for sockets that could be reasonably expected to supply equipment outside the equipotential ...


2

I believe that this document is for your unit and it indicates a 3amp fuse. Refer page 29, the trouble shooting section, top row, 5th column


2

Now you're cooking with gas Lots of people make 30A cooktops. And lots of people make 20A or 30A ovens. Neither one is a problem to acquire. So one possible answer is to pull a gas line to the location, and then go with separates: use the existing 30A for the oven, and the new gas for the range. This gives you the best of both worlds: an oven that doesn'...


2

It's possible because a range has it's electrical requirements calculated based on a certain usage pattern that might not be realistic. They might require 40A, because if you turn on the oven and all the elements, it's going to draw 40A. But, no one really does that. You might use the oven and one element, or no oven and two elements... That's the answer ...


1

Considering the low cost of a new one, your obvious inexperience (or why would you be asking), almost certainly a lack of available spare parts, and the possibility of physical or property damage if you make a mistake, I recommend replacing the GCFI.


1

Yes. The only issue you'll get into is if your nation's electrical code requires a higher grade of breaker. For instance most breakers in the USA or Canada need to be AFCI type. You'd be better off with single AFCIs rather than fooling around with a 2-pole AFCI. In some cases, both AFCI and GFCI is required (or desirable) and in that case an AFCI+GFCI ...


1

There is no way to get a 40A circuit out of that panel Here's the rub: even if you were able to run a new circuit with 8/3 of any description, you still couldn't get 40A out of that circuit unless you changed the panel. Why? The old-style "edison base" plug fuses are limited to 30A at 120V, unlike cartridge-type fuses, which can handle higher currents. ...


1

Good news: you didn't paint yourself into the corner I originally feared When you originally asked about service equipment, my prime concern was that you simply couldn't get a 200A breaker or subfeed lug block to fit in the panel you had originally selected; however, that appears to not be a major concern for this panel, as it is labeled to accept the BRS(F)...


1

NEC 550.32(A) Mobile Home Service Equipment. ...in sight from and not more than 9.0m (30ft) from the exterior wall... Note the NEC in 550.2 says "For the purpose of this Code...the term mobile home includes manufactured homes and excludes park trailers..." I would expect the ufer ground to be good, but you probably should check with the local inspecting ...


1

No, combining the ground will not render the GFCI useless. Just imagine for a minute any metal j-box, or any metal stud construction building, all those grounds become interconnected through the yokes of the receptacles. A GFCI receptacle doesn't use the ground to function, it is required to be grounded if a ground is present, but notice if you look at the ...


1

“Split load” consumer units are quite common in the UK. On a split load unit, approximately half of the MCBs run through a RCD and the other half can either run through a second RCD or may not be RCD protected at all. The idea behind it being that an earth leakage fault tripping a RCD protected circuit doesn’t take out the supply to a whole house - for ...


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