8

Think the screw has nothing to do with removing the dead front. Think this is how: Turn the switch to OFF. Lift up the top plastic section using the holes on the side. This will allow lifting or prying the bottom section over the stop on the bottom. But it may be that you just pry on the bottom in the central slot.


6

While we're discussing bad technique, let me hit the awful practice of "Mister Snippy", snipping the wires short so they can only reach the breaker they're on right now (or the neutral bar). Mr. Snippy thinks he's impressing the inspector with wild overinterpretation of NEC 110.12. Actually they're dooming the panel to a bad hair day of wire nut ...


5

To add to what Ed wrote, the neutrals must be clearly marked as to which neutral is with which circuit. Noting that it is THHN individual wires within conduit, you are not allowed to re-mark a white conductor to be a hot. Therefore any marks on white wires are NOT remarking to hot, but simple markings. You can also just bundle the pairs of wires. Take care ...


5

If you have a double pole breaker or 2 handle tied breakers you can run a normal neutral it is called a multiwire branch circuit. Are you going to need arc fault or GFCI protection in the room? If so I would run a second neutral and keep the breakers separate. GFCI’s don’t always play well with multiwire branch circuits. They can still be used but there is ...


5

To get access you have to pull the shorting bar then you can get to the screw and pop the cover off.


3

Run individual THWN wires in a fat conduit, you'll thank yourself later For your situation, I wouldn't even bother with a direct burial cable; instead, I would run a conduit (or two, even) from the house to the shed, and run 4 THHNs (14AWG is fine since you're limited to 15A circuits and a 15A two-pole breaker anyway by the 14AWG wiring inside the shed, ...


3

Found it. After about 30 minutes of troubleshooting, I found the problem. It is amazing how sensitive the breakers are. This 1/16" exposed neutral from the push in connector wasn't touching the metal box, but was really close to it, maybe 1/32"-1/16" away and it was causing it to trip. Ironically, I hardly ever use these push in connectors, as ...


3

Edit: THIS. Over-full panels invite problems! Go look at this situation and the poster's proposed solution. This person wants to add a subpanel. What they really want is a 125A subpanel, which should be easy. But they're willing to settle for a 50A subpanel since they feel forced into using a double-stuff breaker, and they're very comfortable using a 30/...


2

They are not unsafe. BUT If you pick up the tandem breaker and a full size breaker and look at the area that plugs into the bus of the panel and if you take a good look at the panel itself, you will see that there is a lot less area that makes contact between the tandem and the panel bus. In fact about half the area. If the circuit is a heavily used circuit ...


2

You need to read the specifications for your panel. Almost all panels have a bus stab limit that is lower than the total panel capacity. Not all stabs are created equal -- the panel might allow higher-amperage breakers at the top or on one side. Here's a picture from my last home. Note my 200A panel allows 100A circuits on the left but only 70A circuits ...


2

You answered your own question. This is a ground fault. Your TV circuit isn't in a wet or unfinished area, so it doesn't have or need ground fault protection, so it doesn't have a problem. Since the problem happens on two different GFCI-protected circuits and didn't happen when the refrigerator was brand new, there likely really is a problem. Multiple ...


1

They don't have to be adjacent to be a MWBC sharing a neutral, just on different legs and without handle ties. Handle ties were not always required. Fridge's have been known to trip GFCI breakers. Try switching it to a non GFCI. Why is the adjacent room on a GFCI? If possible try a regular breaker on that room too.


1

Since you ran #14 in the shed, you will need the breaker to be 15A. The two breakers for the Shared neutral circuit (Multi-Wire Branch Circuit or MWBC) must be handle-tied. Or it can be a 2-pole breaker. If all the #14 wire is on one leg of the MWBC and the other leg is all #12 or larger, then you can use a 15A and 20A breaker with a handle tie.


1

NO WAY!!!! If I understand you correctly, you want to run 2 15A circuits over one cable. You can't do that. (There are certain exceptions involving a 3-wire cable, but I assume you are describing an ordinary 2-wire (plus ground) cable.) Depending on how you wire up those two circuits, you would either end up overloading the wires (30A on wires designed for ...


1

This is how the panels ended up after some work this weekend. Cleaned up the breakers that dont belong in the Murray Panels. Upgraded the feeds and feeder breaker to the pool pump sub panel (Primarily to upgrade the panel in the future if needed.) ]1 Pool / EV Charger Sub Panel


1

The good news: you only have a few things to clean up in your panels The good news in your situation is that your "alien breaker" problem is less severe than it appears at first glance; while your panels are Arrow-Hart (Murray), they are cross-labeled to accept Bryant (now Eaton) BR, Westinghouse (now Eaton) (H)QP, and ITE EQ-P (apparently now ...


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