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14

However, if I only turn off the lights breaker, and go into the switch panel with my voltmeter, I am still detecting 100V AC across the switch (with it off), even though the lights stay off when I turn the switch on. … Can anyone tell me what might be going on? Coupling between wires (inductance and capacitance in parallel wires). You say you have strange ...


12

In residential interior wiring, voltage irregularities generally are only a concern when over-voltages are seen and not under-voltages. Incidentally however, when there is an under-voltage, there is usually an over-voltage on the opposite phase somewhere else to balance it out. 113V is fine. Light bulbs, except for the LEDs, are pure resistive loads and ...


10

It's a floating neutral. But it's only the one circuit. Find, re-strip, re-splice, and tighten down all of that circuit's neutral connections. If it goes directly through an outlet, pigtail it.


9

Add some ground pigtails Take the existing bundle of bare (ground) wires, and add a couple pigtails of bare or green wire to the bundle, making sure the bundle is joined properly using a wirenut or push-in connector instead of just being twisted together. The other ends of the pigtails simply land on the green ground screws of the new dimmers.


9

You have a "single-pole" arrangement, i.e. one switch controlling the load (the light). You simply need to turn off the circuit breaker controlling this circuit, remove the two wires from your existing dimmer switch and place them on the two wire terminals on the new dimmer switch (the terminals that are NOT green). It does not matter which wire goes to ...


7

Simply put, you have the wrong type of switch for the bulbs you have installed. Most (not in every scenerio) LED bulbs require you to install an ELV type dimmer. What you have installed is a standard incandescent dimmer. There are three main types of dimming switches. Incandescent, CFL (for incandescents, fluorescents, and SOME LED bulbs), and ELV (for ...


7

Everything you are saying depends on where the electrician checked the voltages. Dimmers will affect the voltages on the load side. So did the electrician check for voltage drop across the dimmers themselves? If there is a drop it would be there. The other thing that causes abnormal voltage drop are joints not making a solid electrical connection. So look ...


7

Rundown in layman's terms: Light switch to outlet. You will see a lot of these in older homes. By code for a long time in a lot of areas you had to be able to turn on a light from a switch accessible when entering a room. Easiest and most cost-effective way to do this is put switch to outlet. I had six rooms in my house like this. Dimmer to outlet. For sure ...


6

No, you should not have to replace both of the existing switches on each circuit. You won't be able to dim from both ends, of course. You just need a "3-Way LED Dimmer" and follow the appropriate wiring. Replace one of the switches (on each set of lights that have two switches) with the dimmer - the other switch will turn them on or off, at wherever the ...


6

This depends on the manufacturer's statements. Typically switch devices are rated for their expected normal device load. Wiring heat loss, etc. should be negligible enough to ignore. Here's what one manufacturer said on their website: Electronic low-voltage transformers also dissipate some heat. These inefficiencies are small enough to be accounted for ...


6

Personally I always go up a size in dimmer if I am that close to the limit. If it is ganged with other dimmers then derating forces you to. Will it work, absolutely. Will it fail sooner at that high of a load, most likely. Will it get very hot, definitely. Will it be dangerous, no, not really.


6

I'm in same boat. When I redid the house I'm in, I installed as much LED lighting as I could and the rest is halogen. What I've learned is, dimming range is based completely on the driver in the LED bulb. And most LED bulbs will only dim to about 20-30% of there maximum. I'm sure you know how dimmers work, but for those that don't it is basically a ...


6

Short answer, most dimmers do get warm when in use. If the dimmer does not have a mechanical method of turning completely off. Then there is a good chance that you are still getting some electrical flow through the switch and that would mean the dimmer could stay warm. In other words what @Harper said. The biggest question I would have would be if it was ...


6

Switch switching outlets. That's normal enough. Often the outlet(s) switched are far from the switch, because that is where the installer thought you would want to put the light. The installer was wrong. They always are. Because of that some of them switch more than one receptacle. Split receptacles. That is normal. That's what the "tab" between ...


6

Based on the instructions and Single Pole installation (i.e., one switch rather than 2 switches), this should be quite simple: Line - Hot This is one of your black wires. Hard to tell from the old dimmer *and it may not have made any difference on the old dimmer which wire was hot and which wire was switched hot. It might not matter on the dimmer, but you ...


5

Many dimmers have an adjustment for the minimum level. You don't mention what type of dimmer you have but you can consult the instructions on how to adjust this. As @dslake mentions in his answer, adjustments might be via a knob or screw, but if it's digital, it could also be a button sequence. Needing to perform this is more common with electronic dimmer ...


5

Light dimmers are designed to drive loads that are largely resistive in nature like light bulbs. They are generally not compatible with loads that are inductive. Most, if not all, AC motors are inductive type loads. That said, whether a dimmer switch will work safely with your fan or not depends entirely upon the type of motor on the fan. There are some ...


5

Why would you replace a single pole dimmer with a 3-way switch?? I pity the next person who tries to figure out what the heck is going on with this. Correct replacement would have been - leave the wires that are connected to each other connected to each other. Remove dimmer with one in, one out - replace with switch with one in, one out, connecting wall ...


5

Sounds like the switch is bad. As with anything electronic, sooner or later it fails. Try replacing it with a standard switch to see if everything works as it should. Then you can select a new dimmer if that is the problem. Good luck!


5

OK, here goes: What you have now The power from the panel seems to come in in the middle of the bottom of the box. That black wire is always hot, and is connected to all of your switches via the orange nut you labeled e, which connects wires d, g, i. i connects to j via switch 3, and j (which is the same as m) connects to the always-hot (k) via switch #4. ...


5

We gotta do something about that mess There's no way to avoid the fact that this many wires will be a huge mess in this box. It's already a huge mess and efforts were made to keep it neat. Your #1 problem is just what you're running into - wires are not well-marked. You've done yourself a huge favor by identifying everything before you tore it all ...


5

No, you can't do that. It sounds great until the first time you are short a receptacle and plug in something else - perhaps a vacuum cleaner. And have big problems. Or to give a really bad scenario - your regular receptacle circuits in the kitchen are out but the lighting circuit is working so you move your refrigerator to the "oops, still dimmed" ceiling ...


5

Almost certainly the hot is one of the 3, and the single wire goes to the light this dimmer controls, while the other 2 wires feed unswitched hot to other devices. Given that your assumption is opposite, you MIGHT want to consider an electrician, or further self-education. See Light Switch Terminals which is a very similar question (one less wire in the ...


5

Wires that are green, yellow/green stripe, or bare, are always and only Protective Earth aka Equipment Safety Ground*. They must only be connected to each other and never anything else. That makes the green-white splice WRONG, and it should be removed immediately and attached to real ground where it belongs. Protective Earth is always a safety shield, ...


5

Yes, you can do this. The 14/2, with a ground, would be run into your 3 gang box. The black hot would be connected to the three black dimmer switch wires using a wire nut or appropriate connector. Then the load wires from the switches would be hooked up to the appropriate black wires from the lights. The white wires, neutrals,from the lights would all be ...


4

Have you adjusted the low-end trim? There is a PDF which they class as "advanced" instructions that describes the procedure on Page 25. Hold On button for 6 seconds, until LED (on dimmer) starts to flash. Hold Down button until lamp turns off or starts to flash. Tap Up button until lamp is not flashing and is stable (or is as bright as you want the lowest ...


4

Most dimmers have a little screw behind the face plate that should be adjusted to set the minimum power level that will be delivered to the bulb. Here are some generic instructions that worked for the dimmers I've installed recently: Dimming Range Adjustment Turn dimmer on and move slider down to the bottom. Turn adjustment dial up or down until ...


4

This is a complicated topic because it's very subjective, and also humans' perception of brightness is very inaccurate (non-linear). Among the many difficulties in comparing LED dimming to old-fashioned incandescent dimming: LED bulbs just don't dim as much. Some LED bulbs publish dimming specs (e.g. "dimmable to 10%"), but since humans' eyes are so bad at ...


4

The LED is the most dimming-friendly light source ever made. The problem is that most people are using screw-in "incandescent replacement" LED modules, with obsolete dimming schemes** intended for incandescent lights (which just don't have the refinement to perform well in the low range). This is the ugliest hack in electrical design, and produces ugly-...


4

That isn't three circuits, it's only two. The Romex on the left is the power coming in from your distribution box, and the other two are your two loads. Each switch is connected between the incoming power and one of the loads. I'm not sure why there are so many wirenuts on the supply side — it seems that if one wirenut can connect three wires, then ...


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