15

Wiring Diagrams Locate the schematic In most cases, a wiring diagram can be located inside the HVAC unit. Typically, it will be on the inside of the access cover. Find the transformer on the schematic Once you've located the diagram, you'll want to look for this symbol. Or the actual text that says "Transformer", which may be labeling a crudely ...


8

Install equipment in real junction boxes I've done a lot of wiring and I cannot imagine how you would get a ground wire anywhere near a 2x4. Your wires (including ground) are doing one of two things: traveling inside a conduit (pipe) into a junction box, or travel inside a cable and the whole cable enters a junction box, so ground is inside the junction ...


8

If you're building a new building and having new HVAC installed, I would simply put 1/2" conduit in the wall and be done. That way, you let the installer run the wire they need. I don't know that I would do this without at least consulting an HVAC installer to see where they would put the unit and the air return (typically the thermostat is as near the ...


7

Judging by the Honeywell R7184A Controller manual, you have one of these: You described it as terminal 4 but the diagram just shows two terminals labelled "T", but that is fine: I found a manual for an EnviraCom device which shows terminals 2 and 3 are 24vac power: This means we have the right connections, and according to the R7184 manual: EnviraCOM™ ...


5

Note: the solution here is the querent's -- I'm simply writing it up in a CW answer to get this off our plate as the querent has not returned to migrate it from his question-edits to an answer himself. SOLVED (01/04/15): I decided that the T terminal was exactly what I needed so gave it a try and everything is working perfectly. I also pulled in some 18-5 ...


4

The obvious answer is to run a new thermostat cable with five wires instead of trying to use jumpers etc that in the end just end up causing more troubles, like destroying a circuit board. In most cases if can be as simple as attaching a new one where the old one goes up the wall from the basement if it's open. If it's a finished basement then a little more ...


4

Forget the wires. Use a wireless thermostat, placing the receiver in the basement at your furnace and the transmitter wherever you want it. The Venstar Add-A-Wireless Thermostat T1119RF might do the trick. If you musts have the wifi thermostat, put it in the basement, and add a remote sensor to the mix.


4

It's a bit high but whether it will be a problem depends on your thermostat and how it tolerates the high voltage. Also consider that the furnaces controller board is also receiving this voltage. Before you start anything else, check to see if your thermostat can be calibrated and complete this step first. To rule out the higher voltage as the cause of ...


4

Yes you can terminate any number of connections on the C terminal. All of the connections will be in parallel. This is very common.


4

According to this document, the internal wiring of that relay looks like this. It sounds like it's connected something like this. When the thermostat calls for heat, the T terminals are connected through the thermostat. This causes the relay to energize, which closes the contact between terminals 5 and 6 (It also closes a contact between 3 and 4). When ...


4

I had the same problem with the same model switching relay and following the encouraging description given in a comment on Tester101's answer, made the same modification to expose a connection which provides the 'C' terminal. This is shown in the photo below. This is a view of the rear of the modified back of the circuit board (not normally visible without ...


4

Um, I don't know where you got the term "power stealing". What you describe as that, is exactly the normal way to do that thing, and the right way... unless you are aware of some capacity issue on the transformer (as is sometimes seen in transformer-relay combos). As far as the R and C terminals, any HVAC transformer has two pins on the 24V side... They ...


4

What you need to do is to move the Blue wire at the furnace over to the "C" terminal at the furnace. Then at the new thermostat connect the Blue wire to the thermostat's "C" terminal. Note that at the furnace the White wire currently on the "C" terminal goes into a separate cable bundle that is paired with the Red wire in that same bundle. That cable most ...


3

The C-wire substitution requires you to use the G-wire. When using the G-wire as a common you have to change it to C at the thermostat, and then to a common in the bottom panel of the unit. In your situation, your specific unit uses an older style control board made by White Rogers. This early revision of the board did not have a terminal bus on the board ...


3

If there's an easy way to get from the basement to the main ceiling, then you could just run an entirely new cable for your thermostat. There's nothing that says you have to follow the existing path. Just abandon the old cable. You could even take advantage of this to move the thermostat to a better location, if you were so inclined.


3

It appears according to the manual for the Mastertrol Automatic Balancing System (MABS) EZ Zone (EZ-2 and EZ-4) Control Panels (PDF), that M1 is used for C. Click for larger view This does not appear to be the manual for your device, so this information may not be correct. The manual for the MABS 2 Zone Panel (PDF), also shows M1 being used for C. UPDATE: ...


3

Normal voltage range for 24 volt HVAC systems is 20 to 30 volts. Normally if you are in that range to the upper/lower bound of accuracy of your measuring equipment you're fine. An induction transformer will read higher when lightly loaded. All of them I've ever worked with over the years do this, even modern switched mode supplies have a lower bound under ...


3

You'll have to connect the blue wire in the thermostat cable at both ends. Start by connecting the blue wire in the thermostat cable to the Comm terminal in the furnace. Then connect the blue wire in the thermostat cable to the C terminal on the thermostat.


3

Okay... After reviewing your new photos, I think I have it figured out. This is what your system looks like You'll have to excuse the glitter pens, it's the only thing I could find on my wife's desk. It's pretty simple actually. When a thermostat calls for heat, the valve for that zone opens, and the boiler is also signaled via the auxiliary switch in ...


3

You'll start by wiring the furnace and A/C as follows: Red from the furnace connects to Red from the thermostat cable and Red from the ADD-A-WIRE™ device. White from the furnace connects to White from the thermostat cable. Green from the furnace connects to Green from the ADD-A-WIRE™ device. Blue From the furnace connects to White from the A/C condensing ...


3

"C" is not always labelled as such. If you can determine the two wires on the 24V side of the transformer (load side), then find which of the two wires on that side is running to "R" on the thermostat. The wire NOT running to "R" is always "C".


3

Technically, there should only be one wire connected to the screw terminal. However, it's common practice in the HVAC industry to connect more. If you want to do it the proper way, you should use a twist-on wire connector (or other connector), and a length of scrap wire to make a pigtail. Disconnect the wires that are currently attached to the terminal. ...


3

You simply have to connect the new wire you ran between the "C" terminal on your thermostat and the "C" terminal on the furnace board. You can test with your multimeter, you'll get 24VAC between R and C terminals. Judging from your photo you have an air conditioner (it will be connected to Y and C), and there is already something else on C -- perhaps a ...


3

Since you have a R841C (with an integral transformer) You have your terminals on the relay confused. Connect RH to the HOT terminal from the relay and W1 to to the NEUTRAL terminal from the relay. C on the Nest is left unconnected, and you do not need a separate transformer here. If this was an R841D (standalone relay) You have your terminals on the Nest ...


3

Typical "thermostat wire" is a NEC/UL type CL2 cable, just like your speaker wire says it is, so as a replacement for an 18/2 thermostat cable, this will work just fine.


3

With only two wires between the thermostat and the boiler, you're not going to be able to power the thermostat, and call for heat. You'll need at least three wires for that. The C terminal on the controller is likely the COM terminal, though I can't say for sure. According to the schematic, pin 2 of the PCB connector is C. But I'm not sure where it's ...


3

According to the wiring diagram for your system (i.e. Figure 2 in the linked PDF) -- the yellow wire on the 24VAC side is the C wire (it's the wire that goes to the compressor but not to the 'stat in the diagram). Just incorporate the green wire from the thermostat cable into the nut with the yellow and green wires in it on the 24VAC side, and you'll be set!...


3

Air conditioners need a C wire, too! That separate cable that is connected to your Y and C wires goes out to your air conditioner's outdoor unit. It connects to the coil of a contactor inside the outdoor unit that turns the compressor and condenser fan motors on when you want air conditioning and off when the air conditioning demand has been satisfied. ...


3

You're correct, you'll use the normally open (NO) terminal. When the thermostat calls for heat, it will energize the relay coil. The energized coil will close the contact in the relay between common (C, COM, etc.) and normally open (NO). When the coil is not energized, the contact connects the common (C) terminal to the normally closed (NC) terminal. When ...


3

The thin blue wire at the thermostat is connected to the Y terminal, which means it is used to call for cool (air conditioning). You'll notice at the furnace, that the thin blue wire connects to the thin red wire. The thin red wire goes to the contactor coil in the A/C unit outside. Once you have the new cable run, you'll connect the wires as described ...


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