3

There's a chance that a backflow-preventer valve is stuck open, allowing hot water from Zone-One piping to flow "backwards" into Zone-3 piping. See if you can find these valves- they likely are close to your furnace. They are probably green, with a directional arrow printed into the metal housing (and have only one inlet and one outlet). Also, ...


2

It looks to me as if you have shoved the insulation of the blue wire down under the screw terminal at the furnace end. This could be keeping the internal copper conductor of the wire from even contacting the screw terminal block. You may have done the very same thing at the thermostat end of the blue wire. Note how in the below picture the adjacent red wire ...


2

The set point or thermostat is just a switch it has nothing to do with the heat in the system unless a high end one. With that said there are possible multiple speed taps on your blower motor and depending on the setup it could be in a higher speed than needed for heat. Normally we run AC at a higher speed than heating but not always. Some systems are dual ...


2

Six-foot baseboard heaters are sold in varying voltage and wattages. You can buy a 1250 watt, 1500 or even 2-3000 watt heaters in the six foot lengths. So, I would not assume anything about your old heaters. On a 20-amp circuit, you can have a maximum of 3850 watts. So, you might be within that limit, you might not. There's my caveat. So if you're ...


2

I notice that you have two red wires used for R and W. Perhaps they have been swapped, so the wire labeled "R" at the thermostat is actually connected to "W" on the furnace control board, and vice versa. That would mean that when the thermostat tries to activate the fan, it is just connecting the wires for heat and fan, without connecting ...


2

The blue wire at the furnace is likely feeding an airconditioner relay or something that was added later to the furnace. The unconnected blue wire in the "bundle" needs to go to the c terminal so both of them are connected there.


1

Shorting the two wires -- usually -- turns stove on but not always. When thermostat won't start stove, shorting wires will not start stove. That might indicate a thermocouple problem. The thermocouple makes the electricity which the millivolt thermostat is turning on and off. That electricity opens the gas valve. Stove turns on/off just fine using manual ...


1

In your case the thermostat on the heater will turn off once the temp is achieved that and your 1 hour timer will mean you save $ because while sleeping it will be off if you turn it on it will only be on for 1 hour or until the room reaches temp. Resistance thermostats are not variable they are on or off at the value selected like 1000w,1250w or 1500w so ...


1

If you're single and in and out of the house a lot, playing thermostat can be very efficient. I did it for years and had lower electric bills than any of my friends that had programmable thermostats . If others are in the house, then you take the chance of them leaving the switch on when they should have turned it off so using a thermostat be be a better ...


1

Both neither is wrong nor right. Because it's all depending on your preference after all. If you are likely to turn on/off frequently and making your time to turn on longer than expected it could be more costly. You can use a power meter to calculate your power consumption for this heater with thermostat regulating and with the manual so you know how big the ...


1

When you have a heat pump the thermostat that controls it is a 2 stage thermostat. The first stage controls the heat pump and the second stage controls the heat strips. The heat pump operates off the first stage and if it can not produce enough heat and the indoor temperature falls below the thermostats set point by a certain amount the second stage ...


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