24

A lot of handy boxes and old work "gem" boxes have knockouts that are made to knock from the outside in. This picture of a Steel City handy box shows it clearly If you have to remove these from the inside, there is a trick. You can't pull the KO with a hammer. But if you drive a small self drilling screw into the KO from the inside then back ...


21

Pigtails in a panel are fine... Wire-splicing and pigtailing within a loadcenter cabinet (panel enclosure) is expressly permitted by NEC 312.8(A), and is quite safe (provided the splices are made up properly, of course): (A) Splices, Taps, and Feed-Through Conductors. The wiring space of enclosures for switches or overcurrent devices shall be ...


19

There is no problem with installing junction boxes above a suspended ceiling, as long as the box is less than 100 in.³ and securely fastened. National Electrical Code has this to say... National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 3 Wiring Methods and Materials Article 314 Outlet, Device, Pull, and Junction Boxes; Conduit Bodies; Fittings; and Handhole Enclosures ...


19

All connections must be in a junction box. They're mentioned several times in the instruction manual. Pull the wire through the hole and into the junction box (not included). Using a quick connector, secure 120 VAC house wiring from the wall switch to the fan as shown in the wiring diagram on page 3. It is odd that this model doesn't provide an ...


17

This is easy What you have here is a low voltage (NEC Class 2) transformer that steps house voltage down to a safe voltage -- they're typically used to power doorbells or HVAC controls, but may be found in other places as well. Simply get your new cable into the box with the power off (use one of the built-in NM clamps you can see on the bottom right), ...


14

It is a transformer. It purpose is to reduce your house voltage to something lower, typically used for doorbells.


14

The two items that you were thinking are nails are in fact almost 100% sure to be rivets. See yollow circles in the below picture. Picture Source These rivets secure some type of metal bracket to this phenolic/bakelite box. The bracket is then either nailed to the adjacent ceiling joist or to a rail that bridges between two joists. Trying to remove this box ...


13

Good news and bad news. The good news is, this is very strightforward. This box is being used solely for distribution. There are no switches involved here, so you have the good luck that the wire colors happen to match up to wire function. All these wires aren't just sitting here waiting for you. They all are already doing a job. One cable (black/...


13

I have heard and even participated in lengthy debates on this subject. The code is very clear, and the difficulty in maintenance and troubleshooting is of course easy to see. Many of the arguments go down the path of, "Aren't there other things permitted in the code that are just as likely or more likely to create a hazard?" But that's not the ...


12

It looks like you are up against a corner on the left, which means you can't simply shift the outlet into the box location. In a perfect world you have enough cable to move the box to the other side of that stud. You would then simply repair your drywall. (We've since learned that there's a door to the right, just out of frame, making this impossible.) ...


11

As Jack noted, you really really need a junction box here. As mounted, the wires could rub against the metal plate. A pancake might be overkill, though (and you do need a NM clamp for those). I would recommend a joist junction box instead It's fan rated, requires no clamps, and you can attach your plate to it easily. Oh, and you don't need to ground a ...


11

Use a surface mount electrical box:


10

Yes, you should install covers on the boxes. You should be able to pick up covers at the local hardware or big box, fairly cheap. Just make sure you measure all the boxes, and note their shape, before heading to the store. If the mounting screws are not in the boxes, you'll also have to pick up some of those. National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 3 Wiring ...


10

Each current carrying conductor (hot, neutral) that enters the box, counts as one (1) box fill unit. All the grounding conductors together, count as one (1) box fill unit. Pigtails do not count. The device counts as two (2) box fill units. Total all the box fill units, and multiply by the multiplier listed for the conductor size. Three 12/2 with ground ...


10

It's mandatory When putting identical-appearing circuits in a conduit, you must differentiate them somehow. It's mandatory. I would not bundle them but mark them individually. Black(blue) and White(blue) for instance being the obvious pair. Bonus points: use a decent length (2") of shrinkwrap so the tape doesn't come off someday. The reason I don't ...


10

I call them "pin anchors" but I think they have a longer actual name like "mushroom head drive anchors". The anchor is set by driving with a hammer, but can be "un-set" by unscrewing the pin because it has a twist thread on it. Just unscrew then pry out.


10

The main problem here is always troubleshooting (and if you're burying boxes you might be doing other dumb electrical things). Your circuit stops working one day, so you start to look for the issue. After ruling everything else out (boxes you can reach and crawl spaces or attics), you're now left with a couple of troublesome and costly options Open the ...


9

The wiring sounds perfectly normal to me, for US standards: white wire = neutral black wire = hot (unswitched) red wire = hot (switched) When the switch is on, the black and red wires are effectively connected together at the switch, so the voltage between them is zero. If you look inside the box where the switch is, you'll see that it is connected between ...


9

What everyone has said is fine, but here is an optional method I would use. First straighten the wire out as best you can. I usually us a pair of lineman's pliers our a heavy duty needle nose. Then you can purchase some shrink insulation from your local hardware store or electrical supplier and shrink a new piece of insulation around the nicked area. I ...


9

NEC officially says abandoned wire/cable should be removed altogether from the box, and the walls, and if that is not practicable, then utterly destroy it where it is reachable. Fortunately, they don't say that about conduit, because I have loads of conduit routes I'm not using right now, that I prefer to keep in place for future use. Even though you ...


8

Move the run over a few feet, which would it stick it beside the air duct (I think there's about 1/2" between the duct and the adjacent stud. Is it safe for them to be so close?) There is nothing I see in the NEC that puts restrictions on running electrical line near HVAC as long as it meets other code requirements. It must be properly anchored to the ...


8

This is a single circuit, and the neutral is common to all branches of this circuit. In this case, all neutral wires in this box must be connected together. Similarly (and this is regardless of single or multiple circuits/breakers) all grounds must be connected to each other, as well as to the box itself. In the case of your switches, they simply need a ...


8

It is the Gentex GX90 Remote Audible Signal which can be used as a fire alarm. It probably is a fire alarm because I could only find references that mention use as a fire alarm, but I presume it could be used for something else. I say that because they also offer a "Fire Alarm Red" color which would imply the off-white version could be used for something ...


8

Having installed a Hampton Bay myself (Home Depot's in-house brand) I was surprised to hear it didn't have a built-in box (in fact, it would be stranger to find a bathroom exhaust fan that has no box at all). But the manual clearly shows this model DOES have a box. They show it (oddly enough) with armored cabled or conduit, but you can easily do this with NM ...


8

You don't use a grommet in this application but rather an appropriate clamp. The correct type depends on what you are connecting here but the usual thing for non-metallic cable is something like this: https://images.homedepot-static.com/productImages/7b668807-9db0-42c3-86b1-e9ec7481045c/svn/halex-conduit-fittings-20511-64_1000.jpg


8

There's a connection that you can't see or get to without opening the wall. Like this:


8

This looks like a common ceiling receptacle box. Why are you trying to replace it? If all your doing is installing a ceiling light fixture the box in the picture appears perfectly adeqate. Most new fixtures will have a mounting plate that gets attached to the box by mounting screws which connect to the box via the screw holes at the top and bottom of the box ...


8

A GFCI only requires the same fill as any other device. In your case with 14-2 one cable in one cable out and the device 4 current carrying conductors 1 ground ,x 2 device , clamp. 14 awg =2 so 2 x 8 or 16cu inch. 2 devices ? 20 cu inches? There should be plenty of room, if you get excessive with your wire length that will quickly gobble up room, if your ...


7

You're going to want to use a junction box to switch between nonmetallic sheathed cable, and individual wires. Conduit body must be marked with volume The first problem you'll run into while making splices in the conduit body (which isn't likely a problem, since most fittings are labeled), is that you'll have to make sure the conduit body is "durably and ...


7

Absolutely not. Any box containing splices or live wires, even if it's not being used, must remain accessible.


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