Hot answers tagged

9

Yeah, that works. Sorry for such a short answer; your design is correct.


5

A GFCI receptacle has line and load connections. This is different from an ordinary receptacle that has two sets of screws that are functionally identical (as long as the magic tabs are not removed). This may have been deliberately installed this way. But it is quite possible it was a retrofit GFCI (which is a good idea - they are important safety devices ...


5

A GFCI is one way to make an ungrounded circuit that you cannot manage to retrofit ground for safer than an otherwise unprotected ungrounded circuit. However, it is always preferable (and required in any new work) to have an actual ground connection as well. Things fail in various ways, and if the grounding pin on a grounded item is actually connected to ...


5

If you're running PVC anyway...there's no need to wrestle that UF alligator down the pipe! Since you're planning to run PVC conduit in any case, you shouldn't bother trying to wrestle that 12/2 UF alligator down it. Instead, what you want to run inside the conduit are 3 individual 12AWG THHN/THWN wires (hot, neutral, ground) of the appropriate colors. This ...


4

In your diagram the GFCI outlet is connected directly to the power source. The additional two outlets are also connected directly to the power source. Those two additional outlets are NOT being protected by that GFCI outlet being shown in the picture.


3

Gfci’s trip at aprox 5 ma your fuse is 15 or 20 amp so this small leakage would not be enough to blow a fuse or trip a breaker and the issue could have been there for years. 1950 wiring is usually cloth wrapped and the insulation can be in bad shape. Measuring resistance on a plug in device will not tell you if it is the problem many devices that have ...


3

The same as a ground on a standard outlet, provide a current path from the metal chassis to ground that will be lower resistance than your body. A GFCI will trip as soon as the sum of the AC current of live and neutral is above a threshold for longer than a specified amount of time (typically on the order of a few dozen milliamps for 16 milliseconds). ...


3

No, that's not normal. Usually the lights are on a separate circuit that's not GFCI protected and the outlets are on a dedicated, GFCI protected circuit.


3

Grounds have two roles. Enhancing human safety: the GFCI pretty much takes care of that problem. Protecting equipment: The GFCI does absolutely nothing to protect equipment from internal or external power surges, lightning, or ESD. The GFCI does not provide anywhere for surge suppressors to dump surge current. Hence the ground remains important here.


3

That is what is called a “bootleg ground” and it’s both against code and dangerous. This can be done when there is no ground in the box. It works because the ground and neutral are connected back in the main panel. However, there are problems, such as if the neutral wire back to the panel fails, suddenly, the outlet ground is at 120 volts (through the load, ...


2

Your standard receptacles must be 15A on a 15A circuit or 15A or 20A on a 20A circuit. Your plug-in appliances will all be designed for those type of receptacles (generally 15A and fit 15A or 20A). GFCI is required for bathroom, but doesn't have to be at the receptacle - could be at the breaker. You can't piggyback 15A or 20A receptacles on a 30A circuit (...


2

Electrical cable/conduit routing must be tree topology You can also wire things in a "vine" topology, like 12-15-16-17 - after all, a vine is a type of tree. You can also wire in a star topology (like 12-9-15-14-13). That counts as tree topology also. (but with many connections, box fill rules must be followed just like anywhere else). You can ...


2

Neutral is not ground. Neutral carries normal operating current. Ground is just a safety shield, and can't carry current if it's to do its job. Back at the service panel is a neutral-ground equipotential bond meant to keep all the conductors near ground (not floating at 4000V due to a transformer leak), and to provide a return path for fault current. ...


2

I found that a set of computer speakers tested positive for a short between the hot and neutral. The rest of this (GFCI, etc.) has been well explained by others. But the speakers "positive for a short"? I got burned by a variant of that myself recently. I was replacing a kitchen exhaust fan/light and decided to double check ground to neutral (good)...


2

As an electronics "fan boy", you have rich opportunities to expand your knowledge in the areas of what circuit breakers do, and what GFCI devices do. I'll try to help. Plain Circuit breakers Plain circuit breakers are straight overcurrent devices, but with some complexity. Their job is to prevent wiring in the walls from overheating, and to protect ...


2

Well, this is embarrassing, but hopefully it helps others in the same situation. I used an old 3-way switch I had lying around and I mistakenly connected the ground wire to the other switch terminal rather than the ground terminal. So when I switched it to the off position current was leaking to ground and tripping the GFCI. I wired it correctly and it's all ...


1

It depends what you mean by "normal". A "GFCI" isn't just a stupid-expensive receptacle. It's actually a zone of protection that can protect other parts of the circuit. For instance a GFCI circuit breaker protects the entire circuit. A GFCI recep obviously has the 2 sockets in the zone of protection (kinda the whole point, eh? :) But it ...


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