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17

A private buyer's inspector can write whatever they want. Some have a reputation for being minimalistic that gets them referrals from selling agents, some have a reputation for being "tigers" that gets them referrals from buyers who pride in waving 30 pages of "problems" at the seller. Some will highlight minor issues if there aren't ...


8

My first guess would be that the inspector was misinformed. It's common to have a number of GFCI protected outlets on their own circuit if the circuit is protected by a GFCI breaker in the main panel. Individual GFCI outlets do not have to be on their own circuits. The only reason I can think of that would be a safety concern would be if the GFCI's were not ...


8

So those metal cut-in boxes are really designed to be gangable switch boxes, but there's nothing wrong with using them as long as you don't violate wire fill allowances. They are a design from an older time when electrical devices were much smaller. They are not up to standard sizes of today and are inadequate for modern devices containing electronics. As ...


5

Not violating any code that I am aware of, though I am not an expert. In fact, as I understand it, if the receptacles were not even GFCI protected at all and were installed when there was no such requirement, they would be perfectly fine! In that situation, I would expect a home inspector to note that they should be protected as that is the current code. But ...


4

Finally I am able to solved this issue. This is the configuration I described earlier. Electric Panel---20A Circuit Breaker---GFCI (Kitchen)----Load1---Load2---Load3---Load4 But I forgot to mention that there were 3 more wall sockets connected in parallel to the GFCI. same 20A Circuit Breaker-----GFCI----Load1----To ---Load4 same 20A Circuit Breaker------...


4

Forget it - there's no such thing. UL is the reason. Manufacturers approached UL about creating just that, and UL said no - mainly the interest is in the industrial space. Why? As soon as you provide some sort of programmatic API for a GFCI or really any other protective device... some jackass will come along and write a script which automatically resets ...


4

Home inspections like this all use the same list of issues that they check for regardless of the age of the home. Sometimes they list things that are nonsense for the situation, sometimes they list technical issues that don't really cause real-world problems, and sometimes they actually list things that are dangerous. When I bought my current house "...


3

From the added information in the comments, this 2-gang box is only 3-5/8" wide which is insufficient for the two modern outlets which are installed in the photo. Standard device boxes are 2" wide and this leaves plenty of room for a clean installation without resorting to hacks like tape. This old device box would be grandfathered and code ...


3

If replacing the device yourself is something you'd consider then you're all set to pull it out of the wall and test it. With the power off, remove the faceplate and then remove the device itself from the wall. Don't disconnect any wires just yet; only remove the two mounting screws so that you can pull the outlet and its attached wires out of the junction ...


2

Any circuits fed off a GFCI or RCD device must have total monogamy between live and neutral wires. Any load served by the hot must be served by the neutral. And vice versa. Some amateurs are in the habit of "borrowing neutral" from any old circuit that happens to be nearby. Their logic being that neutral is like the chassis on a car with car ...


2

First require / request the inspector to cite the code # to write a violation ,,, that is a legal requirement in my state, what state are you in? Even in my state under the 2020 nfpa70 code no AFCI is required on the 2 required 20 amp kitchen circuits that are GFCI protected,,,I have seen problems with inspectors for DIY including my self,,, moved to a ...


1

The OP mentioned that he's upgrading outlets in his kitchen which would necessarily require GFCI. To @DrSparks 's correct observation, I would add that I believe all circuits should be AFCI protected now as well. So why not use a AFCI/GFCI dual function breaker and be done with it?


1

My guess is the inspector is just confused, their training and certification is really questionable at best. I have been called to "fix" things that weren't a problem, for instance a breaker that was UL Listed for two wires had two wires. The seller agreed to have it "fixed", since there was available breaker space to add a breaker the ...


1

In some local codes (my own familiarity is here in Ontario) it may say that a house must have an exterior GFCI outlet on a dedicated circuit. In other words, at least one. I guess the idea is that you may have something like a corded electric lawn mower that draws a high load and they want to make sure there's at least one that can handle it. But there's ...


1

Not all GFCI outlets are made the same. Some have “Line” on the top, some have “Load” on the top. Check it. Don’t make the same mistake I did assuming you can simply pull an outlet and replace the new one the exact same way.


1

The first rule of GFCIs You have connected the GFCI's neutral pigtail to the neutral bar correctly. The only thing that can explain several GFCIs failing in every iteration of your rather exhaustive testing - is also one thing you did not mention. The first rule is: All hot and neutral current MUST come through the GFCI device. Because, the basic function ...


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