41

Such a fun question deserves an equally fun answer. Sure you can! And there's a neat trick that will help with all those troublesome NEC 2014/17 rules: simply make sure to build this house in a country where the NEC does not apply! Most of the world uses 230V as their standard supply voltage, which is pretty close, but if that's not quite enough for you, ...


37

There are quite a few reasons to use a single receptacle instead of a duplex receptacle. A few that I know of: Recessed for clock or behind a TV. In this case, it is sometimes easier to use with one centered receptacle instead of top or bottom of a duplex receptacle. Air conditioning, range, dryer or other larger-than-usual circuit (in the US, this means ...


36

Several have mentioned The required 120v circuits include 2 small appliances for kitchen counters, 1 for the laundry, 1 for the bathroom(s). But I think the main problem you run into is 210.6. 210.6 Branch-Circuit Voltage Limitations. The nominal voltage of branch circuits shall not exceed the values permitted by 210.6(A) through (E). (A) Occupancy ...


29

Single receptacles are used for reasons Nobody installs one of these by mistake - they're a lot more expensive, to start with! When you find one, it has a specific purpose for being there because of a Code requirement for its application. It may be in a place where GFCI protection is required, but it is appropriate for this individual load to not be GFCI ...


28

There are better ways A wide variety of reliable splice techniques now exist. The reason for soldering "back in the day" was that manufacturing wasn't really up to making "wire nuts" and "Alumiconns" in billion quantity. And labor was a lot cheaper. Today, it would be nuts to use that technique, but I wouldn't condemn old work that has stood the test of ...


24

If you are not removing more drywall than needed for the new recessed lights, then no per 334.30(B)(1) (assuming you are using NM cable). There are similar clauses for other flexible cable assemblies (e.g. AC/MC). However, if you are removing drywall as part of the remodel and have access to the studs, then you do need to secure and support according the ...


24

I will give you an honest answer and could care less about the upvotes/downvotes. Just my experience flipping houses in many US areas and even some overseas over 25 years. First every municipality will have a detailed list of things they require a permit for. almost all places require you to pull a permit for electrical if you pull an electrical permit ...


23

No, it's not ok. For one thing, by the time the city inspector looks at the fully framed building, it will be a little too late to fix it. Secondly, the builder's attitude seems very questionable. Either his framing crew or the concrete sub messed up. At the very least their job is not done in a workmanlike manner. They shouldn't wait and hope things 'slip' ...


21

Not only will you need to get your local inspector's approval, in writing (and the inspector will defer to Underwriter's Laboratories or other NRTL, so we're talking about getting a UL listing for your one-off) ... ... But all your thermostat wiring must now be re-done in Class I wiring methods Because you are intermixing thermostat control power with ...


21

In the US, most places are subject to the NEC, here is article 110.14(B): (B) Splices. Conductors shall be spliced or joined with splicing devices identified for the use or by brazing, welding, or soldering with a fusible metal or alloy. Soldered splices shall first be spliced or joined so as to be mechanically and electrically ...


20

No. It's all or nothing. Imagine a visually-impaired person (or someone in the dark) coming down your stairs and the rail ends. What's the assumption? That they've reached the bottom. That can end badly.


19

All connections must be in a junction box. They're mentioned several times in the instruction manual. Pull the wire through the hole and into the junction box (not included). Using a quick connector, secure 120 VAC house wiring from the wall switch to the fan as shown in the wiring diagram on page 3. It is odd that this model doesn't provide an ...


19

Green wire is perfectly legit. If you are really lazy or in a hurry you can even get pre-cut pre-stripped green grounding pigtails ready to go. Ground is the only thing it can be used for, but "green or bare" is fine for ground nearly everywhere (I think there are some hot tub/pool specific cases where green is required and bare is not OK, but I ...


17

There is one safety issue here It appears that the original installer took the ground wire from the 12/3 cable, looped it around one switch ground screw, then attached it to the other switch ground screw. This grounds the switch yokes fine, but leaves the (metal) box ungrounded save through screw threads. The solution to this is to cut off the existing ...


17

In general, the NEC (or any other code for that matter) specifies how the work must be done, but does not touch on who the work must be done by. The who is covered by local statutes (whether city, county, or state). Permits and licenses are entirely state, county, or city constructs, and various jurisdictions utilize different versions of the NEC.


15

The use of these devices is limited to specific situations, which are described in 334.40(B) of the National Electrical Code. The 2011 version of the code had this to say. National Electrical Code 2011 334.40(B) Devices of Insulating Materials. Switch, outlet, and tap devices of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in exposed ...


15

You are correct in assuming there should not be any live connections exposed in any situation. I suppose it should be said that this is a dangerous situation and could be fixed fairly easy with a set of wire cutters and some appropriate wire nuts. So call the installer and see if they want to make the repair. If they give you any static I would report it to ...


14

Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable The Answer According to the National Electrical Code, you can have 4 12/2 nonmetallic sheathed cables through a single bored hole that is fire- or draft-stopped using thermal insulation, caulk, or sealing foam, or where proper spacing is not maintained for more that 24 in. If you maintain proper cable spacing (which is defined by ...


14

Short answer: Inspectors can't be everywhere, see everything, and probably have enough other work. I speak as municipal inspector for a smaller city in the Midwestern US. For you average DIYer who is working on their own, owner-occupied home, I don't lose too much sleep if they extend a branch circuit on the weekend. Even I have moved my washer and dryer ...


14

Do you need actual outlets? Chargers and lights can both be run off of USB, and a USB hub+extension cables doesn't even involve real wiring. It also works in both 120V and 240V countries with just a plug adapter as long as you get a 120/240V hub, which could be an issue if you just use regular outlets. I'm not sure there's any legal concerns, because you're ...


13

According to the National Electrical code, you have a few options. Depending on the situation, there are a few code sections to pay attention to. National Electrical Code 2014 Article 406 - Receptacles, Cord Connectors, and Attachment Plugs (Caps) 406.4 General Installation Requirements. (D) Replacements. Replacement of receptacles shall comply with 406.4(D)...


13

Grounding conductors are designed to only carry fault current, which is typically a very short burst of very high current. Neutral conductors carry circuit current, which means they go through heat/cool expansion/contraction cycles. Multiple neutrals under one screw can lead to loose terminals due to different rates and levels of expansion and contraction.


12

The OP has a great reason for using 12 ga. wire. He already has some on hand, so using it is cheaper than going to get new 14 ga. wire. It's perfectly safe to use it. Don't worry about confusing future workers. If they want to add something to the circuit, they will have to go turn off the circuit breaker first, and then they will see they are working ...


12

OK this is easy. The answer is NO. The construction has issues: There are no bolts for the sill plates. 2.The sill plates should be spaced on the slab so that wall plus exterior finish meets slab. It looks like this house is getting brick or thick stone given the 3 inches or so from the edge. I am not sure about your situation. You are having a ...


12

In the cases where I've run I to something like this, the hotel originally had open walkways around the rooms -- allowing more light in, and probably cheaper to build -- which were later closed off with an outside wall to provide a sheltered approach to the rooms and to reduce energy needed to heat or cool the rooms. The windows were left in place because ...


12

I see several misconceptions, and a general sense of authoritarianism (the government being a "big brother" there to protect citizens from their own mistakes, prohibiting by default, only reluctantly authorizing). in an area where permits (only offered to licensed pros) are required. outright doing it themselves illegally First, permits are ...


12

It looks like you are up against a corner on the left, which means you can't simply shift the outlet into the box location. In a perfect world you have enough cable to move the box to the other side of that stud. You would then simply repair your drywall. (We've since learned that there's a door to the right, just out of frame, making this impossible.) ...


11

Their insurance may lean that way. Rates are probably lower if they are not selling to end-users. They may also not have to deal with sales tax, if they are not selling to end-users. As for the (or more) economic incentive many take for granted: the cost of customer service. The below consumes valuable man-hours and to staff this could double payroll: They ...


11

No, the wall between the home and garage is designed and built as an interior wall. HOWEVER, it is a fire wall. Your code in Oregon requires 1) fire rated door between the spaces, and 2) fire rated wall "assembly", and 3) insulation. 1) The door needs to be fire rated door and frame, which can be a solid core door and a solid wood frame (not a frame with ...


11

To properly remove a receptacle that you don't want a box cover on, you would need to remove the wire. Since you're renovating that area in to a shower, you are probably removing the drywall, so removing the wiring should be simple. Flipping the box around so the outlet is in the adjoining room is also a good idea.


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