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59

It depends on the type of bulb. Regular incandescents won't consume any electricity if the bulb is dead, since there's no continuous path for the current to take. It's just like an open switch. With CFLs and LEDs, it depends on why the bulb burned out, but in general they will consume some amount of electricity even when burned out. Some CFLs may even ...


16

This is what happens when you randomly tear stuff off the wall without taking pix first. I'm guessing you assume the wire colors are meaningful in some way; colors mean less than than you think, and less than nothing at all in 3-way circuits. That stinks, so get some yellow electrical tape; we need to make colors meaningful. Looking at the 3-way switch ...


12

The cable with the white wire that's connected to the two black wires is a switch loop: Normally wires with white insulation are used only for neutrals, but code makes an exception to allow for use of the white wire in a cable used as a switch loop as a hot rather than a neutral. If you'll look closely in the drawing, the whites used as hots are wrapped ...


11

Here's a quick diagram. Switch 1 in the first box has 3 wires, and so does switch 2. In this diagram sw1 is "up" and sw2 is "down" so no current flows left to right. Just join the "down" wire on sw2 (the one you don't want) with the wire that proceeds to the light (or from power), disconnect or remove the other "up" wire, and then sw1 is in complete ...


10

It is possible, as long as they use the same power (or resistance). However, it comes at a risk. If one of the bulbs uses less power (for whatever reason, maybe damaged/end of light ... see Ferrybig's remark below for a good reason), the other uses more, and will break (faster), so it's not a perfect solution. Because of P = V * I <=> 150 = 110 * I, I = ...


9

Add some ground pigtails Take the existing bundle of bare (ground) wires, and add a couple pigtails of bare or green wire to the bundle, making sure the bundle is joined properly using a wirenut or push-in connector instead of just being twisted together. The other ends of the pigtails simply land on the green ground screws of the new dimmers.


9

So your existing fixture (assuming standard US wiring, you'll have to verify) has a hot (black), neutral (white), and ground (bare) and has constant power. The additional lights will need 4 wires - constant hot to travel to the switch (black), a neutral (white) and a switched power that will come back from the switch (red). The existing wire (assuming 14G ...


7

That is a perfectly functional way of splitting a single hot (highlighted green in your sketch) to supply power to two separate switched fixtures. However, most smart switches require a neutral conductor in the switch box so there can be an always-on connection for the "smart" circuitry. It's hard to tell whether or not you have this because all of your ...


7

The decorative nut has been removed but there is still a small little nut that is holding the little escutcheon up against the glass. Use one hand to hold the glass and try to loosen the nut with your fingers, if you can not get it to move with your fingers try a pair of pliers gently.


6

I found almost that exact same image behind a bathroom vanity light fixture that I took down to replace. Needless to say I was flabbergasted that such garbage workmanship would be hidden behind a fixture. You should look very closely at what is just behind the place where the romex cable is coming out one hole and reentering the wall cavity at the slot on ...


6

The fact that the white is with the blacks is very important. Most of what you need to know is in the positions of the existing wires; don't be in a hurry to tear it all apart, or you lose that critical info. Color-coding is not by wire function, it's how cables are made. That white has been reversed to be a hot. This is because it's in a switch loop, ...


6

Generally speaking, you don't want to have a fan/light - or more specifically, a light - on GFCI because if the GFCI trips due to something else on the circuit then you are in the dark. As I understand it (I am not an electrician, but I have seen other questions on this topic and I heard this from my own electrician years ago when he installed heat/fan/light ...


5

The bloke at the big-box store is out of his mind. Having multiple GFCIs fed from the same feed is not a problem whatsoever -- it's something that's done all the time (just imagine a panel loaded with GFCI breakers). Furthermore, the requirements for fixtures in 410.10(D) only hold for a zone that extends 3' beyond the edge of the tub or shower stall and 8'...


5

If it is a true incandescent light bulb: NO, apart from very very minor losses (through insulation imperfections and transmission line effects) due to the fact that a longer run of wiring is now live. In addition, if it is an old school flourescent fixture: Very minor losses due to EMI filtering circuitry. In addition, if it is a LED bulb using a capacitor-...


5

One of the switches has failed and will likely need to be replaced. There will be two "three way" switches and one "four-way" switch. It's the four-way that has broken. The switch may feel different when you toggle it. Unscrew the bulbs until you get it fixed.


5

Yes, you can connect to the same neutral that's currently part of the switch circuit (the source neutral, really). Be sure to leave all existing neutral connections intact.


5

I see what appears to be threads at the top of the cover/diffuser. A counter-clockwise turn should remove it. I also see paint and drywall mud that MAY be preventing you from turning the diffuser.


5

I feel that it is not a good idea as a standard practice. But conceptually, it would be fine to use two 120V filament type light bulbs in series on a 230V system. I have done it before, briefly, and the bulbs appeared pretty normal. So feel free to experiment. But in the long run, maybe the bulbs would not share voltage equally and one will fail prematurely. ...


5

The question depends entirely on whether the fixture acts as its own junction box, with full containment and a strain relief clamp. If it includes a UL listed enclosure, all good. The instructions should make this fairly clear. If not, grab an old work (remodeler) box and pop it in. Be sure you'll clear your studs before you start cutting drywall.


4

I don't know of any restrictions off the top of my head other than in closets and bathrooms. I would make them show you the code reference sounds like someone missed the change and is two lazy to do it they way you wanted it.


4

This is a pull switch that's on the light fixture??? Somehow you spliced into the wrong side of the pull switch. Move the hot wire to the other side of the pull switch, that should take care of it. Or, well I don't know what stage of work you are at, but this might be a great time to install a proper light switch and dispense with the pull switch ...


4

That's called a Bayonet Mount (in your case, single contact, as there's a double contact as well) A bayonet mount (mainly as a method of mechanical attachment, as for fitting a lens to a camera) or bayonet connector (for electrical use) is a fastening mechanism consisting of a cylindrical male side with one or more radial pins, and a female receptor with ...


4

Yes, but we're talking minimal usage. The bulb has to listen for your remote so it's using something.


4

You can splice diferent sizes, temperatures or types (NM, UF, THHN, SJOOW) cable anywhere it's legal to splice cable. It needs to be inside a junction box. The boxes need to be someplaces boxes aren't disallowed. The cables need to have proper cable clamps entering the box. The boxes need to forever be accessible without disassembling any part of the ...


4

You may be overall better off looking at replacing the fixtures with something different rather than stressing out trying to find an matching cover. It is fairly easy to source fixture covers that look more like this: These also more of a contemporary styling as well. Another thing to consider is the replacement to LED technology for the energy savings ...


4

That's terrible. Whoever did the work did very shabby and unsafe work, and you may have a house full of that. One option is an "old work" (meaning retrofit) junction box that attaches directly to Drywall, however drywall is basically schoolhouse chalk wrapped in paper soaked in glue, you don't expect it to have any strength. It's a basically useless ...


4

I decided to replace the fan with a new, quiet model. I'm a fairly handy guy and I'd already done the kitchen ceiling light quite easily, so I figured, no big deal. It is no big deal. There are 2-3 wires coming down that actually go to the fan/light. Those are the only ones you touch. Easy peasy, and it's done. These kinds of job are so simple they don'...


4

Grab the edges carefully and pull down. Should slide down on metal spring catches on two sides. Once down about an inch, you'll see them. Sqeeze together, like tongs, and pull down and out of the slot in the recessed frame. Some have coil springs but if it's difficult to pull down, it's probably the sqeeze style.


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