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28

As long as they are normal screws and you unscrew them they won't compromise the studs or their integrity. If you rip the screws out (with a hammer for example) that could compromise the studs. If you plan on reusing the exact same holes there are things you can do to help future screws grip just as well by adding toothpicks to the holes, but otherwise you ...


22

You could use a keyhole router bit to cut keyhole slots in the back to hang it. Another option would be to use a french cleat. Either buy a metal one that could attach to the back of the shelf or integrate one into the wood back. Here is a discussion of french cleat techniques.


22

I think your husband just wants the shoe bins to remain where they are and doesn't want to buy new ones.. LOL. Removing the screws will not damage the studs even if they were load bearing. Patch the holes with a vinyl spackle, sand lightly and you're good to go.


19

Ideally this should be screwed/anchored into a joist for maximum support. However, if you really want to use a drywall anchor, you should use a toggle bolt or a ceiling anchor. Instead of just screwing into the wall, these expand to several times their size which gives you a good hold, especially when the force is pulling directly down. 10lbs might be ...


19

Mount a board on the wall and then mount the screen on the board. Get an 8 foot cedar or pressure treated 2x6, you can then use timber screws to mount it to the wall insuring you hit the studs. You will need to pre-drill both the 2x6 and the cement siding, the hole in the siding should be as big as the screw and the hole in the board should be just smaller ...


19

Mirror clips are made for exactly this purpose. Plain or fancy as fits your decor and/or budget.


16

I installed big, heavy floating shelves in my house. The shelves are simple 2x10's purchased from a hardware store. They are pretty heavy and I knew there would be a lot of torque on any fastener I used. To hang them, I used 5/16ths threaded rods purchased from Home Depot. I cut them to about 7-8 inches long. Using a 1/4in drill bit, I drilled 4 holes into ...


14

If the shelf is thick and deep enough, you could use a "concealed floating support bracket." I purchased a few at eBay. My picture of it below. This particular concealed floating support bracket requires a 12mm diameter hole drilled into the shelf, about 100mm deep, to accept the long supporting pin. You'd also need to cut out some of the back of the ...


14

If that mirror has a wooden frame you can attach picture hanging brackets. the frame looks to be about 10mm thick which is plenty.


12

I would not risk hanging a glass shelf with those strips. They are meant for hanging things directly from (like a towel, hair dryer, etc.), not a shelf that sticks out. Instead of just pulling down on the strip, it will pull down and away, almost a guaranteed recipe for broken glass. Unfortunately there is no way to anchor something to the wall without ...


12

As a variation of this answer you can use any of these cabinet shelf hangers, called keyhole fittings, (which can be found in your local hardware store): They are attached to the back of the shelf somewhere where the material is thick and strong enough. You have to make a cavity under the lamp-shaped hole so there's room for the screw head - the cavity can ...


12

If the mirror doesn't weigh much more than 15 pounds, you could use some Command picture hanging strips (such as these or these). They're easy to install and relatively inexpensive.


11

Concrete is a great building material because it has very high "compressive strength"; it resists being crushed, and so can support a very heavy load placed on top of it. However, it has very poor "tensile strength" and "shear strength"; it can be "pulled apart" relatively easily. This means that hanging stuff from underneath usually doesn't work very well, ...


10

You could definitely just silicone the suction cups to the tile. This is kind of permanent in the sense that you will not be rearranging this, but not so permanent that you are hurting the tile. To take it out a putty knife would do the trick. Might have to use a solvent to get rid of the remnants but not a big job at all.


9

Your local mountaineering/rock climbing/etc. store (Mountain Equipment Co-Op is the one I am familiar with) will care a Swivel device that allows for rotation while still supporting the loads seen with a swing. Swivel Image http://images.mec.ca/fluid/customers/c822/4001-684/4001-684_PDP_Image/main_variation_NOC02_view_view1_350x250.jpg?20110209163550 The ...


9

I had this problem recently with a shower caddy from IKEA. It lasted for about four months, then I bumped it, and I couldn't get it to stay. I cleaned the tile and the suction cups without success. The caddy fell in 15 minutes after putting it up. I found that my problem was how I cleaned the suction cups. After I washed them, I dried them with a cloth. ...


9

The best approach I have found is to make sure everything is clean and then apply a small layer of petroleum jelly to the suction cup. It helps to create an air tight seal.


9

Another option is a french cleat. You really, really, don't want mirrors to fall off the wall. They shatter and explode and if there is any biological unit in the area they are likely to get cut (not to mention any heart attacks from the explosion or the seven years bad luck). You can buy one (e.g.: https://www.amazon.com/Hangman-Z-Hanger-Mirror-Picture-...


8

I recently had to do something very similar (using a door as a headboard, mounted to the wall). I ended up using these nifty little flush hooks. They will leave your shelf 2-3 mm away from the wall, but if you have a router, you can rout a recess to mount the hooks in the back of yourself, which will make it completely flush. They take pretty small screws,...


8

If the canoe is getting in the way, can you not put a second pulley wheel with the cord over it off to the side so you can pull the cord from the ground? Then you can just use a standard cleat.


8

I mounted a similar mirror to a wall by drilling symmetrically-spaced holes through the frame (about one per six inches of frame perimeter) and screwing the mirror directly to the drywall using appropriate-length black phosphate coarse thread drywall screws. In my case the the holes in the frame were acceptable, and due to the dark red-brown color of the ...


7

The screws in your picture have a tapered head that match the holes for the screws, so when they are tightened all the way, it will force the screw into the center of the hole; this is why they are OK until they are tightened. My guess is that your marks or holes are not perfectly in the center. It could also be that you are drilling at an angle. Grab a ...


7

Tape and concrete don't really mix that well. It might initially hold, but it will eventually let go. The best solution is to drill a hole and use a light concrete anchor or concrete nail. Alternatively, you can use a special metal band that wraps the pole and has an attachment on it (sorry, I don't know the exact name of these) - they are often use for ...


7

You're already putting lots of holes in your ceiling, which will have to be patched. As long as you don't mind some holes, try this: Use approximately a 1/4" drill bit to drill into a likely spot on your ceiling. If it hits wood all the way through, you've just found a joist. If it goes through the lath and hits a void, get a piece of wire or an old coat ...


7

This may be thinking outside the box, but there are other ways to display a picture rather than "hanging" them. Hopefully these inspire some solutions... Have you considered using some sort of display easel like the one above instead? Google Search: Photo Display Easel Compression poles are also an interesting way to hang things without causing ...


7

I would absolutely not use those for hanging cookware from a ceiling, no matter how smooth. Command strips are designed to carry load in shear, parallel with their mounting surface. Your application would have the load in tension, perpendicular to the adhesive. This would result in detachment with much smaller loads or in a shorter timeframe. The finished ...


7

I've dealt with this issue by using chains (although, not outdoors, and it was a more permanent installation, so I didn't have to keep hanging & removing it). Basically, you attach brackets at the studs as high as you can, and attach chains to them. You then attach the screen to the end of the chains. You want the brackets to be as high up as possible,...


6

Step 1: Go to Home Depot or Lowes and raid the paint department for paint cards that look similar to the color of your bathroom wall. Step 2: Take the cards home and hold them up to the wall one at a time. You may want to get a friend to stand outside the room or get as far away as possible and view the card from multiple angles. Turn the lights on and off, ...


6

The thumb tacks will hold best if they go straight in to the wall without wiggling. If they move back and forth as they're going in, they'll create a larger hole from which they could more easily be pulled. If you can push the tacks all the way in without side to side movement without using a hammer, then there's no advantage to using one. If the hammer ...


6

Shear strength of the hardware isn't going to be a real concern. A single 1/4" Grade 5 lag bolt, in a configuration like this, will fail at roughly 13,000 lbs. Even 1/8" lag screws (well down into "numbered" screw sizes) will have a shear strength of over 3,000 pounds. Your piece of slate, if its density and dimensions are fairly regular for the species of ...


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