Hot answers tagged

28

As long as they are normal screws and you unscrew them they won't compromise the studs or their integrity. If you rip the screws out (with a hammer for example) that could compromise the studs. If you plan on reusing the exact same holes there are things you can do to help future screws grip just as well by adding toothpicks to the holes, but otherwise you ...


23

You could use a keyhole router bit to cut keyhole slots in the back to hang it. Another option would be to use a french cleat. Either buy a metal one that could attach to the back of the shelf or integrate one into the wood back. Here is a discussion of french cleat techniques.


22

I think your husband just wants the shoe bins to remain where they are and doesn't want to buy new ones.. LOL. Removing the screws will not damage the studs even if they were load bearing. Patch the holes with a vinyl spackle, sand lightly and you're good to go.


19

Mount a board on the wall and then mount the screen on the board. Get an 8 foot cedar or pressure treated 2x6, you can then use timber screws to mount it to the wall insuring you hit the studs. You will need to pre-drill both the 2x6 and the cement siding, the hole in the siding should be as big as the screw and the hole in the board should be just smaller ...


19

Mirror clips are made for exactly this purpose. Plain or fancy as fits your decor and/or budget.


19

You've hit on three viable options. I'll make some notes on each so you can decide. Run a cleat across the gap Requires perhaps the most damage to the finished ceiling, but simple and fairly easy A 2x6 laid flat against the ceiling will carry the weight just fine (avoid boards with large knots) Four 3-1/2" by 3/8" lag screws, properly piloted into the ...


19

I vote for the solution of providing blocking in the attic but will suggest a technique which is very much easier to install than some of the other answers here. A side on looking picture will get the idea across quickly. First trip to the attic to access the situation should include making measurements for spacing between the ceiling joists and the ...


18

Cut a 1"x 4" board just long enough to fit between the wall on the right and garage door on the left. Attach each end with 2 1/2" screws into the studs of said wall and door frame. Screw hook, ( or hooks ) into the board. Other wise like i said in the comments, take it to the store to size and anchor, i have seen ones big enough for that size hook. Be ...


16

I installed big, heavy floating shelves in my house. The shelves are simple 2x10's purchased from a hardware store. They are pretty heavy and I knew there would be a lot of torque on any fastener I used. To hang them, I used 5/16ths threaded rods purchased from Home Depot. I cut them to about 7-8 inches long. Using a 1/4in drill bit, I drilled 4 holes into ...


16

It's a "fangs" style fastener- I use similar styles to hang junk in my cubicle. The teeth latch on to the foam board in my cubicle walls, or it could also be used to grab the foam backing of a picture frame. Found it on amazon by googling "Eye Fastener for Foam Board" Drytac Push/Pull Hinged Hanger


14

If the shelf is thick and deep enough, you could use a "concealed floating support bracket." I purchased a few at eBay. My picture of it below. This particular concealed floating support bracket requires a 12mm diameter hole drilled into the shelf, about 100mm deep, to accept the long supporting pin. You'd also need to cut out some of the back of the ...


14

If that mirror has a wooden frame you can attach picture hanging brackets. the frame looks to be about 10mm thick which is plenty.


12

As a variation of this answer you can use any of these cabinet shelf hangers, called keyhole fittings, (which can be found in your local hardware store): They are attached to the back of the shelf somewhere where the material is thick and strong enough. You have to make a cavity under the lamp-shaped hole so there's room for the screw head - the cavity can ...


12

If the mirror doesn't weigh much more than 15 pounds, you could use some Command picture hanging strips (such as these or these). They're easy to install and relatively inexpensive.


11

You could definitely just silicone the suction cups to the tile. This is kind of permanent in the sense that you will not be rearranging this, but not so permanent that you are hurting the tile. To take it out a putty knife would do the trick. Might have to use a solvent to get rid of the remnants but not a big job at all.


10

I had this problem recently with a shower caddy from IKEA. It lasted for about four months, then I bumped it, and I couldn't get it to stay. I cleaned the tile and the suction cups without success. The caddy fell in 15 minutes after putting it up. I found that my problem was how I cleaned the suction cups. After I washed them, I dried them with a cloth. ...


10

The best approach I have found is to make sure everything is clean and then apply a small layer of petroleum jelly to the suction cup. It helps to create an air tight seal.


8

I recently had to do something very similar (using a door as a headboard, mounted to the wall). I ended up using these nifty little flush hooks. They will leave your shelf 2-3 mm away from the wall, but if you have a router, you can rout a recess to mount the hooks in the back of yourself, which will make it completely flush. They take pretty small screws,...


8

If the canoe is getting in the way, can you not put a second pulley wheel with the cord over it off to the side so you can pull the cord from the ground? Then you can just use a standard cleat.


8

I mounted a similar mirror to a wall by drilling symmetrically-spaced holes through the frame (about one per six inches of frame perimeter) and screwing the mirror directly to the drywall using appropriate-length black phosphate coarse thread drywall screws. In my case the the holes in the frame were acceptable, and due to the dark red-brown color of the ...


8

Another option is a french cleat. You really, really, don't want mirrors to fall off the wall. They shatter and explode and if there is any biological unit in the area they are likely to get cut (not to mention any heart attacks from the explosion or the seven years bad luck). You can buy one (e.g.: https://www.amazon.com/Hangman-Z-Hanger-Mirror-Picture-...


7

This may be thinking outside the box, but there are other ways to display a picture rather than "hanging" them. Hopefully these inspire some solutions... Have you considered using some sort of display easel like the one above instead? Google Search: Photo Display Easel Compression poles are also an interesting way to hang things without causing ...


7

You're already putting lots of holes in your ceiling, which will have to be patched. As long as you don't mind some holes, try this: Use approximately a 1/4" drill bit to drill into a likely spot on your ceiling. If it hits wood all the way through, you've just found a joist. If it goes through the lath and hits a void, get a piece of wire or an old coat ...


7

Wrap one end of the rope around a pillar 3-4 times, tie the loose end back to the standing portion of the rope (probably with a bowline), and then slide the wraps up to the top of the pillar so that the part furthest from the knot is highest, with the rope smoothly wrapping down from that point. Do the same for the other end, tightening the rope enough to ...


7

I would absolutely not use those for hanging cookware from a ceiling, no matter how smooth. Command strips are designed to carry load in shear, parallel with their mounting surface. Your application would have the load in tension, perpendicular to the adhesive. This would result in detachment with much smaller loads or in a shorter timeframe. The finished ...


7

I've dealt with this issue by using chains (although, not outdoors, and it was a more permanent installation, so I didn't have to keep hanging & removing it). Basically, you attach brackets at the studs as high as you can, and attach chains to them. You then attach the screen to the end of the chains. You want the brackets to be as high up as possible,...


7

Just get a couple of joist hangers and add a 2x6 between your joists. Drill a small hole in the ceiling where you want the eye bolt first and poke a wire hanger through to help locate it from above.


7

I would fabricate or locate a a hanger with a single hole for the screw and a hanger loop. Use your machine screw to mount the hanger loop to the plaque and hang it on a standard picture hanger suitable for your wall type. You could swap to flush screws if it stuck out too much and put spacer shims on the sides in back if needed so it sits flat


6

Shear strength of the hardware isn't going to be a real concern. A single 1/4" Grade 5 lag bolt, in a configuration like this, will fail at roughly 13,000 lbs. Even 1/8" lag screws (well down into "numbered" screw sizes) will have a shear strength of over 3,000 pounds. Your piece of slate, if its density and dimensions are fairly regular for the species of ...


6

Depending how much damage you can do to the wall - it may be feasible to put two steel grub screws in the holes so they are flush, and to secure two neodymium magnets embedded/glued in the wall at the same offset. If you can't find suitable grub screws, the pictured bolts could work, if you hacksaw off the end and thread that stub into the plaque. If the ...


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