36

It's not the end of the world, but you might consider cutting the pieces so the gap is smaller. Why? Some cabinets sit on the floor via little legs. If the legs were to be exactly where there's no flooring, it becomes uneven. You'd then have to put something under it the right thickness, which just happens to be your flooring. If it were me, I'd spend the ...


34

Two things: Do not do this yourself. The other answer is technically right but I would only do that if there was no hole. Either call up the place you got the granite from or another installer (which may run you $30-75). The issue is that once you start drilling and your bit catches the edge of the hole already there it will skip. Once it skip you ...


29

Nearly all the reasons you proposed for leaving them free are rare occurrences. (I'm not sure what "doing the stove" means. Cleaning?) On those occurrences it's fairly easy to pull a few 3" screws and do your business. To my mind they don't outweigh the reasons you offered for anchoring them, which mostly involve stability (safety) and a quality feel. Most ...


19

That is just fine. The only possible downside is that if you decide to re-arrange the kitchen in the future and the area will become "uncovered", you will have to deal with it at that point. Maybe make sure you keep enough of the flooring around to fill in the remainder if needed.


19

There are arguments for not having the flooring under the cabinets at all (if it's "floating" flooring, the cabinets on top "pin" that part of the flooring to the floor so it does not "float.") In that case you'd stop 1/4-1/8" from the toe-kick at the front of the cabinet. Other than that, it's a highway for rodents and ...


15

I have done this with granite tiles in two different sizes, 12 by 12 inches (30x30cm) and 18 by 26 inches (45x65cm). Not a full slab, but it should basically work the same. Tools You have two tasks involved: cutting it, and smoothing/polishing the edges. For both cutting and polishing, I used an angle grinder. In my case, I bought a 4-1/2 inch grinder ...


13

I don't have direct experience but generally speaking while a circular saw blade can go through nails, it's dangerous as it increases the risk of a kick back. Although slower, you will be far safer if you cut the counter using a reciprocating saw with a demolition or dual wood/metal blade attached. That will cut through nails without the kickback potential....


11

How about not screwing up your countertop seams, by moving? How about not collapsing sideways due to weight of porcelain + iron sink and granite counter? (I live in earthquake country...) How about not making drawers and doors not work correctly by being out of square? True, the back panel of cabinets ought to act as a shear brace... How about not having ...


10

Things may be different outside the UK, but I've never found the "top coat" flooring to go all the way to wall under cabinets. The cabinets generally have extendible legs so you can get the cabinet to the correct height and level, and so it's unlikely you'll need the additional height that the flooring provides. Putting (possibly expensive) ...


9

Get a 1-3/8" diamond hole saw. Create your 1-3/8" template secure it to the counter (make sure it won't move). I'd use something at least 1.5" thick so that the hole saw stays plumb. The template will serve in place of a pilot bit. The Rigid 1-3/8" diamond hole saw from Home Depot is $28. Buy a concrete paver while you are at it so you ...


8

I made a large kitchen table from maple bowling alley with the arrows. 42" x 84" My alley boards were nailed together, but not glued. I cut it with a circle saw with a carbide tipped blade. When I made it 38 years ago, I was cheap, so I glued clear pine trim on the perimeter to cover the edges. I bolted some T-iron across both bottom ends to stiffen it. 10 ...


8

In the UK at least your cabinets will all be screwed into the underside of your kitchen worktop (except stone worktops which will be glued down with silicone), and also all screwed to each other, so they will all be rigidly connected together anyway. Cabinets may also have utilities such as gas and electric services passing through them. For this reason ...


8

I did a similar job with tiles, but stopped the tiles at the base of the cabinet. Rationale for this decision was that if a tile near the cabinet cracked or otherwise became damaged, it was easier to remove and replace than if the tile ran under the cabinet. I raised the cabinets up by the 1/4" or 3/8" thickness of the tiles (which ran under the ...


7

We do not install hardwood in kitchen under cabinets on the plumbing/gas wall. Your last row should sit about 1/4" from cabinets - you may need to rip these planks. I am a little perplexed at some of the answers and advice here. This isn't a hard question. In Europe we do... No you don't. I have done many renos in France and spend a lot of time ...


6

Oxalic acid, either in crystal form or as part of a pressure treated deck cleaner/brightner will chemically dissolve the stain. If you use the crystals, use all normal precautions for acids (eye, hand, clothing). You can sparingly apply with a small nylon artists brush. Try 5 min increments (5 on, wipe off, 10 on, wipe off) until the stain starts to ...


6

Interesting question and comments. A few things strike me. First, a lot depends on the type of cabinets. Framed vs. frameless in particular. Both types have their merits, and I am not going to get into that debate, but most frameless cabinets I have seen on the market today rely on the wall to some extent for their strength and stability. In both cases, ...


6

Having never installed a floating floor before, take this with a grain of salt... However, I think you'd be OK leaving it like that. The majority of the cabinet's weight will be sitting on the new flooring, so you're not likely to have any tipping or other issues with setting your cabinets. If it were me, though, I'd probably rip flooring to mostly fill the ...


6

Some general input here as I install granite counters weekly. No way the granite is bound to each other trim piece probably has silicone (I hope) binding it to the wall you don't have to have silicone on dry areas. If someone spills a cup of soda on that counter, some will seep behind trim but it is pretty minimal (I have tested for fun). The trim piece ...


5

Although cutting through nails is dangerous, I find I have kickbacks only when using a regular saw blade. When using carbide tipped blades on a 7" circular saw, or a 3.5" cordless saw, as long as I go slow I do not suffer kickbacks. You'll hear noise when going thru a nail, but the carbide is much harder than common nails and screws and it can chew through ...


5

If there is adequate room at the rear of the sink, or if you worry less about centering and just do the sides and the front, a router will do the job nicely. A laminate trimmer may be a better choice on the "fit's the back of the sink" part as they have a smaller base, but they also have more limited bit size/power - still you could do it in a few passes, ...


5

There are likely many ways to get this done. This is how I would do it. It looks like solid wood. The black marks to me look more like dirt trapped in cuts and abrasions gathered over time. So, on the face of it, it looks like sanding and polishing it would get it done. Remove the sink and trims. Then plane it - some 2-3mm with a power tool. To sand it ...


5

(Is that outlet in the kitchen, or is it in the dining area? If it's in the dining area, it might not need GFCI.) The reasoning I'd give is that kitchen outlets are much more likely to be dealing with water than other outlets, even if they're nowhere near the sink. You could have a coffeemaker, or slow cooker, or microwave, or bread maker plugged in there, ...


4

The counterop weighs less than 300 lbs. The cabinets probably weigh less than 100 lbs. This is about 400lbs spread over a floor area of almost fifteen square feet. this is less than 30 lbs per square foot. An adult standing still is about 150 lbs on one square foot. You should have no problem with the load regardless of the placement with regard to the ...


4

Looking at the actual code... National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 210 Branch Circuits 210.11 Branch Circuits Required. (C) Dwelling Units. (1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits shall be ...


4

If you are installing a tile backsplash, just sort the issue out on the tile substrate. Depending where you want the tile surface, either overlay backerboard and shim to correct the gaps, or rip out the current wall surface and replace with backerboard, shimmed to correct the gap once the tile is installed (which may mean an even gap before the tile is ...


4

This looks to be a bad install. The gap seem too large and that is with the epoxy filling it. When a good installer deals with seams there is a process where they will clamp each side (suction cups or other methods) to push the pieces together. They will add the epoxy in before sandwiching and then scrape off and level the pieces. For different types of ...


4

I wouldn't sign the form if you were told that you wouldn't be able to notice the seams. As Jack says, they are in horrible locations. But the #1 thing I am thinking about is I have had granite and quartz installed on at least 30-40 kitchens, with at least 15-20 Ls. You have two sheets, not 3 and your seam is in the corner. If they are using smaller ...


4

I would recommend heavy duty constructive adhesive followed by grout colored caulk that best matche the grout around the tiles https://www.google.com/search?q=grout+colored+caulk to minimize cost and work I would risk using the caulk as glue try to remove the old adhesive clean back of tile and wall well put a lot of construction adhesive on the back of ...


4

No no no on the planer. Unless you can totally remove the top and send it through an industrial planer that can do it all at once, a planer is a terrible idea. It will just be full of ridges, you will have bad edges, and probably take off too much. Normally I would hit something like this with 40 grit on an orbital sander - not belt - and then slowly work ...


4

Answer based on the NEC in the US: Can I install a receptacle a few inches in on the half-height wall (so that it's still under the counter, but not a full 12" in)? Yes, that's almost right. As long as you are not more than 6" in laterally off the counter edge you are fine. Also, the receptacle cannot be more than 12" down from the counter top.


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