29

Nearly all the reasons you proposed for leaving them free are rare occurrences. (I'm not sure what "doing the stove" means. Cleaning?) On those occurrences it's fairly easy to pull a few 3" screws and do your business. To my mind they don't outweigh the reasons you offered for anchoring them, which mostly involve stability (safety) and a quality feel. Most ...


15

I have done this with granite tiles in two different sizes, 12 by 12 inches (30x30cm) and 18 by 26 inches (45x65cm). Not a full slab, but it should basically work the same. Tools You have two tasks involved: cutting it, and smoothing/polishing the edges. For both cutting and polishing, I used an angle grinder. In my case, I bought a 4-1/2 inch grinder ...


12

I don't have direct experience but generally speaking while a circular saw blade can go through nails, it's dangerous as it increases the risk of a kick back. Although slower, you will be far safer if you cut the counter using a reciprocating saw with a demolition or dual wood/metal blade attached. That will cut through nails without the kickback potential....


11

How about not screwing up your countertop seams, by moving? How about not collapsing sideways due to weight of porcelain + iron sink and granite counter? (I live in earthquake country...) How about not making drawers and doors not work correctly by being out of square? True, the back panel of cabinets ought to act as a shear brace... How about not having ...


9

First, take off all the doors, drawers and counter tops. Many times, counter tops are glued to your base cabinets, and are bolted together at the seams with pocket bolts. Try to take these off carefully if you plan on re-using them, or donating them too. Then, look for a board near the top of the base cabinets, this is the board usually used to screw the ...


8

Well Jeff, the term corbel is new to me also. I always thought corbel was a champagne. But as far as supporting the granite: I think those corbels are quite ugly and rather than replace them with more ugly corbels, I'd be inclined to build a support structure around the top of the knee wall and trim it out. If you were to add a perimeter of 2×4's dressed ...


8

In the UK at least your cabinets will all be screwed into the underside of your kitchen worktop (except stone worktops which will be glued down with silicone), and also all screwed to each other, so they will all be rigidly connected together anyway. Cabinets may also have utilities such as gas and electric services passing through them. For this reason ...


7

There are common established heights for table/counter surface and seating combinations. They are: Table height: 30in (750mm), with a chair at 18in (450mm). Counter height: 36in (900mm), with stools at 24 in (600mm). Standard bar height: 42in (1050mm), stools at 30in (750mm). Extra tall bar height: 48in (1200mm), stools at 36in (900mm). (Source: runmyhouse....


7

I made a large kitchen table from maple bowling alley with the arrows. 42" x 84" My alley boards were nailed together, but not glued. I cut it with a circle saw with a carbide tipped blade. When I made it 38 years ago, I was cheap, so I glued clear pine trim on the perimeter to cover the edges. I bolted some T-iron across both bottom ends to stiffen it. 10 ...


6

Oxalic acid, either in crystal form or as part of a pressure treated deck cleaner/brightner will chemically dissolve the stain. If you use the crystals, use all normal precautions for acids (eye, hand, clothing). You can sparingly apply with a small nylon artists brush. Try 5 min increments (5 on, wipe off, 10 on, wipe off) until the stain starts to ...


5

You can get the smaller refrigerator, and use the extra space to create shelves for bootles. this way you could have refrigerated wine and not refrigerator next to each other. The shelves would be made to hold individual bottles. Like this:


5

If there is adequate room at the rear of the sink, or if you worry less about centering and just do the sides and the front, a router will do the job nicely. A laminate trimmer may be a better choice on the "fit's the back of the sink" part as they have a smaller base, but they also have more limited bit size/power - still you could do it in a few passes, ...


5

Interesting question and comments. A few things strike me. First, a lot depends on the type of cabinets. Framed vs. frameless in particular. Both types have their merits, and I am not going to get into that debate, but most frameless cabinets I have seen on the market today rely on the wall to some extent for their strength and stability. In both cases, ...


5

There are likely many ways to get this done. This is how I would do it. It looks like solid wood. The black marks to me look more like dirt trapped in cuts and abrasions gathered over time. So, on the face of it, it looks like sanding and polishing it would get it done. Remove the sink and trims. Then plane it - some 2-3mm with a power tool. To sand it ...


4

As DA01 mentioned, there are epoxy-based methods for refinishing laminate counter tops in the $100-200 range. They seem to have fairly positive reviews: Rust-Oleum Countertop Transformation Refinishing System $194.21 Covers 50 sq ft (cheesy how-to video showing how 'ridiculously easy' it is) Counter-Coat $179.95 Covers 35 sq ft (application ...


4

The local Habitat for Humanity might have a ReStore that accepts these donations. They may even help you with the removal. Disclaimer, I'm a regular volunteer with my local Habitat chapter, but I'm not in any way paid by them.


4

Although cutting through nails is dangerous, I find I have kickbacks only when using a regular saw blade. When using carbide tipped blades on a 7" circular saw, or a 3.5" cordless saw, as long as I go slow I do not suffer kickbacks. You'll hear noise when going thru a nail, but the carbide is much harder than common nails and screws and it can chew through ...


4

The counterop weighs less than 300 lbs. The cabinets probably weigh less than 100 lbs. This is about 400lbs spread over a floor area of almost fifteen square feet. this is less than 30 lbs per square foot. An adult standing still is about 150 lbs on one square foot. You should have no problem with the load regardless of the placement with regard to the ...


4

Looking at the actual code... National Electrical Code 2014 Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection Article 210 Branch Circuits 210.11 Branch Circuits Required. (C) Dwelling Units. (1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, two or more 20-ampere small-...


4

If you are installing a tile backsplash, just sort the issue out on the tile substrate. Depending where you want the tile surface, either overlay backerboard and shim to correct the gaps, or rip out the current wall surface and replace with backerboard, shimmed to correct the gap once the tile is installed (which may mean an even gap before the tile is ...


4

This looks to be a bad install. The gap seem too large and that is with the epoxy filling it. When a good installer deals with seams there is a process where they will clamp each side (suction cups or other methods) to push the pieces together. They will add the epoxy in before sandwiching and then scrape off and level the pieces. For different types of ...


4

I wouldn't sign the form if you were told that you wouldn't be able to notice the seams. As Jack says, they are in horrible locations. But the #1 thing I am thinking about is I have had granite and quartz installed on at least 30-40 kitchens, with at least 15-20 Ls. You have two sheets, not 3 and your seam is in the corner. If they are using smaller ...


4

I would recommend heavy duty constructive adhesive followed by grout colored caulk that best matche the grout around the tiles https://www.google.com/search?q=grout+colored+caulk to minimize cost and work I would risk using the caulk as glue try to remove the old adhesive clean back of tile and wall well put a lot of construction adhesive on the back of ...


4

No no no on the planer. Unless you can totally remove the top and send it through an industrial planer that can do it all at once, a planer is a terrible idea. It will just be full of ridges, you will have bad edges, and probably take off too much. Normally I would hit something like this with 40 grit on an orbital sander - not belt - and then slowly work ...


4

Answer based on the NEC in the US: Can I install a receptacle a few inches in on the half-height wall (so that it's still under the counter, but not a full 12" in)? Yes, that's almost right. As long as you are not more than 6" in laterally off the counter edge you are fine. Also, the receptacle cannot be more than 12" down from the counter top.


4

Sure, but it leaves you open to a less perfect fit. Backsplashes have much more flexibility of position than a granite top, so the latter should really be installed first. You don't want anyone trying to cut tile after it's installed. That sounds like a risky proposition with respect to quality. I'd prime and paint your drywall and wait.


3

Even without knowing how thick it is or how heavy, that's a lot of marble. You really need to attach this to something, somewhere. The wall, the floor... Without that, you would have to have a serious counterweight at the bottom, at least as heavy or heavier than the marble. Why not just attach it to the wall or the floor? When your child's health is at ...


3

That's a laminate countertop. You may want to try to use a repair compound like SeamFill or FormFill Laminate Repair - the damaged spot is small enough where it may work. You'll need to remove the blistered material with a sharp knife before applying the compound. Instructions for application, complete with '70s style cartoons, can be found here. If the ...


3

Here's a countertop material comparison chart. It compares them by appearance, durability, sink options & value. One thing it does not cover is how environmentally friendly the products are, both in production (raw material consumption and energy consumption) and ongoing maintenance. In that light, Quartz (aka engineered stone), wood (reclaimed or ...


3

I had a similar countertop, and thought about making corbels, but ended up modifying pine shelf brackets from Lowes. I doubled them up, gluing two brackets together & filled the seam with wood putty.


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