32

If you use a product known generically as anaerobic thread locker, you will prevent the rotation of the fastener unless it is done by a wrench. Locktite™ is one such brand name, although many other names abound. Do not use the red version, as it is nearly permanent, requiring application of intense heat to release. Blue is medium and holds well under ...


30

That's an expanding plug anchor as is commonly supplied by closet system manufacturers. Pull the nail out by the head (a locking plier works well), then pull the plastic plug out. Here's a representative item: ClosetMaid has a blog post on removal.


29

The Easy Way Fortunately, you're holding up a model train, not an actual train, so you can take some liberties. The hard part is following the rounded, off-square corners; the easy way to work around that is to literally cut corners. Rather than attempt to follow the rounded corners, just install four shelves as long as the straight parts of each wall, ...


23

Those 2x4's are almost certainly the remnants of a previous shelf support and are certainly not structural elements. You can safely remove them.


22

You could use a keyhole router bit to cut keyhole slots in the back to hang it. Another option would be to use a french cleat. Either buy a metal one that could attach to the back of the shelf or integrate one into the wood back. Here is a discussion of french cleat techniques.


21

Strong and light and cheap? Take a look at torsion box construction. Granted it's not exactly thin but as @Joe mentioned, getting all four of those qualities is a tall order.


21

You don't. You transfer cut marks. You don't need to make a paper plan of your cuts. Just lay the shelves on each wall. Don't attempt to span a whole wall with 1 shelf board, it should always be 2 boards for ease of handling. If the wall angle is less than 90 degrees, initially cut each shelf at 80 degrees so its back can go all the way into the corner....


20

"Structural" applies to load-bearing walls and the like. I think you're safe. From what i can tell in the picture, unless you're storing engine blocks on them, you should be fine.


17

I'd try a few of these keyhole mounting plates: You'd need to be very precise with screw placement so everything lines up properly. If you're feeling adventurous, you could chisel or route out a recess so the whole thing is flush against the wall. You could also mount the plates to the wall at a stud, using sufficiently long screws, and then use smaller ...


17

I have experience with both. I'll try to answer your bullets and then some other thoughts. Which adds more to a home's value? Well, typically bookcases don't add to the value because some people want them and some don't. If you wanted to build them in, you're typically going to go custom with that and build it yourself. The rigid dimensions for a pre-...


16

I installed big, heavy floating shelves in my house. The shelves are simple 2x10's purchased from a hardware store. They are pretty heavy and I knew there would be a lot of torque on any fastener I used. To hang them, I used 5/16ths threaded rods purchased from Home Depot. I cut them to about 7-8 inches long. Using a 1/4in drill bit, I drilled 4 holes into ...


16

You might consider mounts like z-clips These are listed as 1 7/8 inches high overall, but you might be able to trim the height (a little off the top piece, a little off the bottom) to just a bit less than the thickness of a 2x4, recess them into the back of the piece, leaving a small lip of wood at the top to conceal the mount (the bottom would have to be ...


16

The answer is simple: Lock washer. It looks like a washer but it's split, and slightly bent to form a spring compression against both surfaces and locks them together. Hence, "lock washer." There are various types of lock washers (I'm technically referring to a "split washer"). The split ones are most common. They're simple, cheap, and effective. Check ...


15

Enter The Sagulator - it's a free online calculator for sag of shelves which is a wonderful tool exactly for these questions. Running your 2 shelf sizes, the larger shelf span (122 CM) won't hold more than about 2 KG overall without noticeably sagging. The shorter shelf (61 CM) can hold about 10 KG overall. As you can see, 10 MM plywood isn't that stiff ...


14

There are basically two things you have to determine - what is the supporting structure and what is the surface material. First the support - in most private homes this is commonly wood frame, such as two by fours (boards, called studs, nominally 2 inches (5 cm) wide by 4 inches (10 cm) thick, but actually about 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) by 3.5 inches (8.9 cm)). ...


14

If the shelf is thick and deep enough, you could use a "concealed floating support bracket." I purchased a few at eBay. My picture of it below. This particular concealed floating support bracket requires a 12mm diameter hole drilled into the shelf, about 100mm deep, to accept the long supporting pin. You'd also need to cut out some of the back of the ...


13

I'd suggest going with the plywood over the particle board. Will probably be a lot lighter, and probably more dimensionally stable as well. Depending on your scenery goals, I might suggest using 1/2" ply with a foam top to allow ground contours for visual interest. Use blue or pink foam, and not the white beaded foam, as that is much more messy. To cut ...


12

As a variation of this answer you can use any of these cabinet shelf hangers, called keyhole fittings, (which can be found in your local hardware store): They are attached to the back of the shelf somewhere where the material is thick and strong enough. You have to make a cavity under the lamp-shaped hole so there's room for the screw head - the cavity can ...


12

An even cheaper solution is locknuts, which are different to nyloc nuts. Locknuts are simply second nuts threadded on at the same time as the main load bearing nut. Then you oppose the two nuts by tightening them against one another. Locknuts are often thinner, and strangely they cost more than normal nuts, so its totally workable to use two normal nuts ...


12

Just four simple cuts. I would use slightly oversized brackets and leave a gap against the wall. It might actually make for a nice floating effect. Set a shelf along one wall, leaving a uniform inch or so behind and keeping all shelf boards in alignment with each other. Leave gaps at the ends, also. Now lay the shelving on an adjacent wall, overlapping ...


12

I think generally, shelves are non-structural. Structural use is building a house. Although I bet those 2 could use your good-looking shelves as a sweet fort structure! That doesn't count. My idea: let those 2 paint the shelves. They go to the paint store and each one picks his / her color. The boy gets the vertical pieces. Then when those dry, the girl ...


11

Put the leg that best matches your shelf width under the shelf. That is why there's different leg sizes. The bracket's critical section is the inner corner, it is equally strong in both directions. That said, usually the critical portion of the entire assembly is the withdrawal of the upper wall screw. Having the long leg against the wall somewhat reduces ...


10

Cleats. Well, If I didn't simply add up what this expletive redacted liquor cabinet just cost me (not counting husky-containment and mopping time) and shoot it into the sun to be wholly replaced with a decently made hunk of furniture, which I'd be fairly inclined to do after what you just went through. I would glue and screw 1x2 wooden cleats (non-...


9

Echoing Steven's answer, I wouldn't do kitchen cabinets either. I would get/build a real workbench that can hold 100's of lbs on the surface. If you aren't up to building your own, you can buy some nice-looking kits from Lowe's, Home Depot, Sears, or Sam's Club. Maybe start with a ready-made workbench as the core of your workshop, and build the remaining ...


9

The type of shelf pins shown in your photo are able to twist out of crappy MDF or particle board side walls when a lot of torque is placed on the pin due to excessive weight placed upon the shelf. There are alternate types of shelf bracket pins that are designed to keep the pin at 90 degrees to the side wall thus keeping it from torquing out of the hole. ...


9

Assuming that the screws don't feel loose when you remove them due to inadequate length or pilot holes that are too large, you can reuse the holes. I've done just that a thousand times with everything from knickknack shelves to solid wood doors. The point of concern usually isn't the holes, but the screws. If they were barely adequate before, they'll be ...


8

I recently had to do something very similar (using a door as a headboard, mounted to the wall). I ended up using these nifty little flush hooks. They will leave your shelf 2-3 mm away from the wall, but if you have a router, you can rout a recess to mount the hooks in the back of yourself, which will make it completely flush. They take pretty small screws,...


8

I find it hard to believe that a few bottles would tear those pins out, unless either 1) the shelves are too short, resulting in a lot of torsional force, or 2) the pins weren't fully seated. Four pins, even in MDF, should support 100 lbs. easily. Custom and pre-built cabinets around the world use simple dowels for shelf support, even in particle board, and ...


8

Get a pair of vise-grip locking pliers: They clamp down and can turn ANYTHING. I used them to remove some one-way screws. Just be careful never to try them out on your fingers, unless you like the idea of having your bones replaced with metal implants.


7

Unsupported 1x12 over a 5' span will sag (even under its own weight). As an alternative you could get some of these shelf tracks (~$2.25/track) and some 12" brackets (~$1.30/brace) and then lay your 1x12's on top to make the shelves. This option also allows you to easily adjust the shelves up and down, to suit your needs. If you want to make the shelves ...


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