15

I have done this with granite tiles in two different sizes, 12 by 12 inches (30x30cm) and 18 by 26 inches (45x65cm). Not a full slab, but it should basically work the same. Tools You have two tasks involved: cutting it, and smoothing/polishing the edges. For both cutting and polishing, I used an angle grinder. In my case, I bought a 4-1/2 inch grinder ...


10

I am a granite top fabricator, and every time I drill a hole in granite or marble, it always scares me. I think, "what if I crack this top by making the slightest error; I better pay attention and take my time!" Because the slightest error can break your stone top; even with experience it is nerve racking. First you need a hole saw guide. Cut a guide hole ...


8

I made a large kitchen table from maple bowling alley with the arrows. 42" x 84" My alley boards were nailed together, but not glued. I cut it with a circle saw with a carbide tipped blade. When I made it 38 years ago, I was cheap, so I glued clear pine trim on the perimeter to cover the edges. I bolted some T-iron across both bottom ends to stiffen it. 10 ...


6

Rather than using "L" brackets why not set the counter top in place and get a few bundles of shims and shim up the difference? The brackets will be difficult to install exactly at the height you need whereas the shims are easy to adjust very small differences. Once everything is level, you can secure the counter top in place. Enjoy it and Good luck.


5

You can absolutely do this yourself with a powerdrill and 21 dollar diamond hole saw from HD. For a standard faucet hole, you need a 1 3/8" diamond hole saw. I ended up not only drilling the faucet hole, but laminated the edge to double the thickness, polished with a diamond pad, and installed an undermount sink. There is no doubt that this is a risky DIY ...


5

I would handle this as a tile countertop. Instead of small 4x4 tiles you will be working with the larger slate sheets. This means, 3/4 plywood down as a base. Cement board on top of that and then thin set to attach the tiles. You can then trim the outsides in whatever you want. It can be wood, tile or metal. You can also use the slate cut into smaller ...


5

Sink holes (faucet/soap/whatever) are almost always done on site. The actual sink cutout is already done at the shop and the company doing the install probably does not want to risk even further the chance of cracking/breaking. Anyone with a drill and a $15 diamond circle bit can cut these holes out in a couple mins per hole. If they can't they shouldn'...


5

Personally, I would invest in a new laminate routing bit and go over that edge. You could also a chisel and lightly score the edges. I'd put some masking tape on the laminate to protect it while your finishing the edges. A fine grit sandpaper would also work.


5

Epoxy is the way to go, but I would not dremel it out, leave it irregular as it is. It will need to be CLEAN, no contaminates, otherwise it may require a dremel tool. Keep it irregular since the "marbling" is irregular too, it will blend in better. Over fill slightly and use a very sharp single edged razor blade to cut the excess off. You can use a ...


4

This looks to be a bad install. The gap seem too large and that is with the epoxy filling it. When a good installer deals with seams there is a process where they will clamp each side (suction cups or other methods) to push the pieces together. They will add the epoxy in before sandwiching and then scrape off and level the pieces. For different types of ...


4

I have replaced bathroom sinks of various types with ceramic style sinks that sit from the top of the vanity cabinet surface. This work best if the before and after sinks both had the faucet holes as part of the sink body itself. Another factor to consider is selecting a new sink that will work within the hole size of the old sink. This can make the ...


4

Does the new sink fit in the existing hole in the counter top? If so, drop it in, caulk it, adjust (if necessary) and connect the plumbing and enjoy. If not, you'll have to enlarge the hole to make it fit. If you do have to enlarge the hole, you may want to seriously consider hiring someone to do the cutting for you. While you can cut a stone countertop ...


4

Use a long sharp knife, like a carpet/flooring knife, to slice through the caulking or construction adhesive that was used on the top of the vanity when the sink was set onto it. Then yes, use a lifting/prying strategy that minimizes potential for damage to the cabinet. You may need to slice, lift a little, slice some more, lift a little more, slice...


4

~ 20 years ago, I decided to replace my oven. My old (broken) oven was a single ~ 24" oven in a brick wall. My new oven is a double 27" oven. So that meant cutting out bricks, blocks, concrete, etc. with my electrician's heavy-duty tools, followed by a cuts on the left and right with a diamond blade saw. In case you are wondering, most people in my ...


4

Can you paint it? - Yes. Will you regret painting it? - Probably. A concrete stain will get into the material and darken it, and then a concrete/stone sealer will reduce the porosity of the surface. Paint sits on top, and in countertop service will almost certainly get scarred, scraped and generally dinged up - so repainting may be a frequent task. It's not ...


3

I presume the sink is faux marble. Try Lime Away. Or C.L.R. - they should remove it without hurting the surface. Comet bathroom cleaner (The squirt kind) works good on light rust spots, but would take a while on really severe spots.


3

I have installed sinks that are supported by the plywood sub base many times. Sometimes it was framing added strategically, since there was no room for a plywood base. FWIW, countertop installers, all of them in my experience use bolts epoxied in slots under the stone top. This is for 3 cm stone, I would not want that in 2 cm stone, then I would only use ...


3

Having DIY'd a granite tile (24"x24") benchtop with undermount sink I'd say it's not that hard if you're careful and patient. As the comments above say you absolutely must use an alignment jig or similar. I had the freedom to use a drill press and I put masking tape on the stone to give a safe surface to get the last 1mm of alignment. You probably need to ...


3

The countertop guys will laugh at you if you want to span quartz over a 5' span. Basically quartz and granite can barely span a dishwasher width - meaning we get buy with not having plywood over the counters. And that is given nothing heavy is stored on it on that section. Given you will have a washer and dryer below it, I would protect it. Since if a ...


3

First I want to point out that the hardness has a lot to do with cure time and temperature. Longer cures (6-8 weeks) at cool temperature (say 50 °F) are harder. Short, hot cures are harder initially, and crumble later. Generally, the 1pt cement : 2pt sand ratio is best and will have a 3500 psi compression stress. A 1:3 ratio will have less than 3000 psi. ...


3

I am not sure if this is possible in your situation, but when I did mine, I put the top together first, using silicone between the joint, laid the tops upside down and level, then bolted them together. After that 2 helpers and myself set it in place and screwed from under. Hope that helps.


3

Similar to using wood dust mixed with wood glue to fill in some imperfection on a wood project. You will always see it, but most other folks won't. Kind of depends on the scratch. If you have a scrap of your corian, put a scratch in it, take the dust, mix with some epoxy fill the scratch and sand flush. See if it works to your satisfaction. Then put away ...


3

Actually, I think that's a great idea, and I'd tape both faces. I'd then apply a very small bead and tool (finger) it out once. Then I'd pull the tape and tool it again. You're likely to have a few spots where you apply too much caulk, and it'll come off with the tape. Your second tooling will remove the tape lines.


3

I'm going to call this an aesthetic choice. But a bit of remesh/rebar wouldn't hurt, especially in a 60" long chunk or around a sink opening. Personally, I'd find 2-1/2" overly heavy.


3

The stuff for the green bit is edge banding. You can also use thin strips of the laminate that the counter is topped with if you can get it, or have some stashed, so that it matches better. The usual approach to the blue bit is to simply put a sheet of plywood there, parallel to the washer/dryer beside it - or just put a cabinet there, rather than having an ...


3

With my experience, stainless steel counter tops are the best for outdoor kitchen considering the fact that its open to regular changing weather. Make sure you opt for good brand counter tops which are resistant to corrosion and rust which will last for years with NSF certified for food safety.


3

Laminate strips like that are often made of a material like the commercial product called Formica. The material was most likely originally installed with an adhesive called contact cement. This type of adhesive was painted onto both the strip and the edge of the counter top and let dry some before sticking the two parts together. As you can see this type ...


3

Assuming you're installing cabinetry along the entire wall, I'd do this: Find the point on the back wall that sticks out the most. Measure out one cabinet depth and mark a line over the entire length of the floor. (Use a grout line as a reference-- even if your tiles are off-square, these are the lines your eyes will pick up as square.) Install cabinets to ...


3

Since the old sink is cracked just use a sledge hammer to break it into small pieces which can then easily be levered off the glue joints.


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