New answers tagged

1

It's a balance between additional stress on the fasteners and the outward force from the torque applied by the weight of the object and its leverage, or distance out from the wall. Imagine a 12" wide shelf attached to a 6" vertical, forming a 2:1 lever arm. Place a 10 pound object at the outside edge of the shelf: this applies 10 pounds downward ...


3

You only need enough angle that whatever is being held won't get inadvertently bumped off the wall. For heavy things, that's not much at all. For lighter ones, a bit more angle may be needed, but A is already excessive, IME. 15 degrees (or 75, if you prefer to think that way) is plenty. Strength comes from length first, thickness second, and width (height, ...


6

My imperfect grasp of physics would tell me that the strength would be equal in both cases, however, B is more likely to jam & be hard to remove later. The downward force is equal in both cases, the adhesion/grip force will be greater in B. There's potentially a leverage force also in B, but my high-school physics says that will be too small to come into ...


5

I don't know that the strength really lies in the angle. If I were picking, I'd go with X over Y, but because you don't want to create too much of a wedge between the cleat and the wall (Y will put more stress on the cleat fasteners). The bevel helps it not slide off the cleat. The main advantage of the cleat is you can mount a board to the wall in a secure ...


21

If you consider the physics of this, the B wedge is going to apply more outward force on the cleat attached to the wall then the A wedge for a given amount of weight supported. So you might cause the attachment to the wall to fail long before you would be reaching the capacity of the bolt's shear limit. Generally a relatively shallow angle will give you all ...


0

Beside all the options that are mentioned above, I found this leak protection for cabinet from Ikea: https://www.ikea.com/fi/fi/p/variera-vuotosuoja-kaappiin-60281993/ It is basically plastic cover for the cabinet's bottom, which I think, is more useful than a drip tray under the cabinet.


1

While I agree this is overkill, in cases where it's important, you can buy a Leak Detector, which is an electronic device that detects the presence of water and alerts you - either with sound, or modern ones will connect to an app and tell you that way. There are inexpensive ones, relatively speaking ($40-$50), though I don't know how well they work ...


3

Seems to me that your best bet is to focus on fixing it properly so that it doesn't leak instead of worrying about leak detection. To answer the question as asked: Store some things under the sink that you use regularly (weekly to monthly), just get in the habit for looking/feeling for unusual amounts of moisture under there every time you get something out. ...


3

Have you ever heard the phrase "Lightning never strikes twice"? I think you're trying to prepare for an accident that is unlikely to happen again. Sure, you can re-floor the cupboard, wedge it slightly at the back to ensure it slopes towards you, cut as best you can round the pipes, perhaps keep a fillet as insert round the back of the larger pipe, ...


1

If your walls are sheetrock, buy a cheap stud finder and find the studs. If you have a stud behind where you want this cabinet, use a 1-1/4" screw with the L bracket into the stud. One is enough. It's not holding the shelf up, just keeping it from tipping. If the shelf is between studs use self drilling drywall anchors, buy them in a kit with ...


0

The problem is that the screws you want to use are meant for press board cabinet case (as seen by the course thread size). These screws are hard to substitute because they require a larger pilot hole (1/4 inch or there about). The only solution since you are limited in using the new screws, is to fill in the existing holes in the cabinet. This requires ...


2

Think there is basic points missing on a good question: If cabinet has legs, it goes on finished floor. IKEA makes a lot of base cabinets on legs, although they sell most base cabinets in the USA with toe-kicks this is not the norm around the world. If the cabinet has toekick (can't see under it), it goes on subfloor. if you install on finished floor ...


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