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34

The casing is very thin and its purpose it to keep the bearing's balls in place, protect them from dust and grime and to hold in some lubricant. It doesn't share any load. The hinges are very durable as the friction load is much less than with a regular hinge. They are also quieter. Below are a few diagrams on what might be inside a ball bearing hinge: ...


33

Sorry, but that is nothing more than a stripped out Phillips screw. I'd say drilling it out is your easiest bet.


16

It is difficult to fully access the problems with the wood behind your door hinge without a picture to see the extent of the damage. None the less let me describe a reasonable repair technique that works well. I would skip the schemes of jamming additional wood sticks or slivers into the existing screw holes because these methods are stop gap measures at ...


15

Painting hinges is not a question of being better or worse. Depending on the motif, hinge finishes are often selected to complement the door or trim color. For example: brass metal finish often used with tan trim/doors or natural wood finishes. Chrome or brushed nickel hardware is popular with white trim/doors. Hinges and passage sets come in a lot of ...


15

The casing is just to stop the balls falling out. It doesn't take any of the vertical load. Inside the case there is a series of ball bearings arranged around the hinge pin. The ball bearings take all the load. When the hinge is turned, the balls rotate. The result is that there is no sliding of metal surfaces over each other, so there is very much ...


10

I agree it is a stripped Phillips screw head, and that the head should be drilled off, the hinge removed, and then the remaining screw shaft unscrewed with a pair of pliers. "Sometimes", you can get or grind a blade screwdriver whose tip is exactly as wide as the Phillips cross. Remove all the other screws, insert the blade tip into two of the remaining ...


8

You might be able to remove the hinge pin by gently tapping from the bottom up, using an appropriate size punch and hammer. The photos don't show the top and the bottom of your hinges well. If the hinge pin is flanged at both ends (like a nail head), then you won't be able to do this, though. Otherwise, you'll have to remove the rivets... You could try ...


8

You can get specialized cutters for that sort of thing, but you can do it without, all you need is a drill, hammer, and chisel. You drill 4 holes in the corners of the hole you want, at the depth you want, then chisel out the material in between. A workbench would be handy for this but you could do it on floor if you like. That is a load of work though, so ...


7

Yes you can do this. You need a hinge cutter: For best effect, use with a drill press if at all possible. You can accurately set the depth of cut and keep it perpendicular to the panel. As long as the material you are using for the door is thick enough at the location where you need to place the hinge.


7

Short of reframing the door, I'd suggest taking a belt sander to the side of the door that sticks.


7

Just to stop the ugliness, I would just get a can of Rust-Oleum gloss enamel (black, white, whatever), then remove the hinges from the cabinets. Clean them thoroughly, and if there's any existing lacquer or hardcoat, try roughing them up with a bit of steel wool. If you can completely disassemble each hinge, that would be ideal; otherwise, work a small ...


7

If you just hung the gate on one set of these it would be a problem. Also if you just used one bolt to hold the strap to the gate it would be a problem. With that said if you build your gate as a rectangular element with proper cross brace so that the gate itself keeps its shape and then mount the straps to the gate with two bolts each you will not see ...


7

They connect the sections together so the entire door moves when opening or closing it. 3 on each side means each except the bottom one is connected to the one below.


6

Well, let's take hinges for example. They typically have plates 3 or more millimeters thick and with two such plates it means you need a 6 millimeters gap between the door and the frame to accomodate the hinges. Do you really want a 6 millimeters gap? It will conduct noise, let unwanted cold/hot air through the door, it'll be very easy to put a crowbar and ...


6

Typically you see painted hinges because the people painting were in a hurry and it wasn't worth the trouble to mask or remove the hinges before painting, rather than as an aesthetic decision. Aesthetically, hinges can enhance the look of the room as shirlock homes explained well in his answer. Keep in mind the type of paint usually used for walls and ...


6

I believe that flat metal plate against the door is a cover that will pry off. You'll find screws underneath.


6

According to the installation instructions (found here), there is a cover in the center that is removed, then two pins pull out, allowing the box cover to be removed. Once removed, there are 4 bolts in the corners of the box holding the face plate on.


6

If you're open to buying a new toilet seat you can find seats with stiff hinges such as this: EZ Close seat Random example, never used above product... With little kids in the house, I've picked up a few of these type of seat from a local home store. They are marketed as "Slam free", "slow close", "quiet close" and similar. The hinge provides enough ...


6

I would look at seeing if you could use large size slider bolts. I used this type of device to provide the safety latch for a large hinged stairway I had built in my garage some 13 years ago. The stairway was raised and lowered via an electric winch and cable/pulley system but I added two of the slide bolts (one on each side) as a safety measure when the ...


6

You should have 2 or even 3 of these hinges to install on the gate which can be adjusted to correct the slope of a loose fitting pin. However if the pin is way too small I would check to see if the right hinge pin piece was supplied. Remember the top hinge pin is usually installed facing downward so the gate can not be lifted off reducing tour security. All ...


5

sears, has a driver set I have used several times it was 12$ for 3 sizes here is a link hope that is allowed: http://www.craftsman.com/craftsman-3-pc-screw-out-174-damaged-screw/p-00952154000P?sid=IDxCMDFx20140801x001&KPID=00952154000 there have been a few times I had to drill out the head then use vice grips to grab the shaft and unscrew that way where ...


5

I know it as a butler's tray hinge, or drop-leaf hinge.


5

They are called plastic dowels There are different sizes for different brands of hinges. Also note that they take special screws. Search hinge plastic dowels and add the brand of hinge, if you know it. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of goods or sources.


4

Why not consider that the times when you need to move big things up and down the narrow stairs would be seldom and under specifically controlled conditions. For example think of a strategy where you only have the rail open when moving furniture up and down from the loft. This strategy can put a whole different spin on the type of scheme that you could use ...


4

Apparently, this is a special hinge that doesn't require screw in the door flap. Similiar to the one shown in this video http://youtu.be/NCpoKo2INog That metal plate is a clip that can be easily pried off, by using screwdriver for example. After the clip is opened, the "tweezers" (red circles in image 1) will loosen and the hinge can now be easily detached ...


4

Barrel Hinge: But note that there's nothing intrinsically wrong with fitting a completely different type of hinge. You obviously need hinges explicitly intended for outdoor use. Not like these


4

If the hinges are on the same vertical line, then (as noted by @DA01) the hinge should stay wherever you leave it (absent wind, etc). If the hinges aren't vertically aligned, then the gate will want to swing towards a specific point. You can use this to solve your problem. Imagine that the gate is swinging on a rod, and can go 360° around the rod. If ...


4

As others have said, it's a stripped Phillips Screw. What's not quite so clear is why it's there. My guess is that someone fitted a brass screw (as opposed to the others which do seem to be steel, at any rate their heads are smaller) in that position, with a power-screwdriver. Then, realising it was proud and stopped the door closing, they tried to remove ...


4

I would remove the affected parts from the door and wall and drop them in a small container which can be a) placed outdoors (for fume abatement) and, b) have paint thinner or Goof Off to soak for minutes or hours. Except for possible varnish finishes on the hardware, paint thinner has no effect on brass, stainless steel, etc.


4

If your doors are overlapping, you simply need another set of hinges with a larger overlay. The hinges in the link are 1/2" overlay and if that is what you are using there, you need to get a set of hinges with a 3/4" overlay. These are also known as "full overlay" hinges


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