Hot answers tagged

53

If your objective is to optimize the product you receive (the completed house) vs the cost you pay for it by sizing to use full sheets of material -- forget it. The cost of all materials combined doesn't strongly dominate the cost of the project; they'll often sum to around half of the project cost. The panelized materials such as plywood or OSB sheathing, ...


26

I'm sorry to be so blunt but the A/C isn't making your yard look bad, your yard is making your yard look bad. That wood barricade needs to go! Search the internet for "landscaping around A/C unit" and you should get plenty of inspiration like the image below: Source The main thing to keep in mind is that the unit needs a minimum 2 feet of ...


19

Drywall/subfloor has to be staggered. So boom you can't make a room that fixes that. Also drywall has depth meaning is your room going to be 12 feet or 12 feet and 1 inch? I have a 5'3" drywall wizard that does a 1000 square feet (including ceiling with lights) in a day easy. He uses a knife and a string and every once in a while a straight edge ...


18

If the ground is perfectly level, then you don't need access to the middle of the circle, you just some point directly above it, and then a longer string traces the shape of a cone as you draw your circle. As you said that you need more precision than having a person just stand on the rocks and hold the string, you will need build some sort of structure to ...


16

You asked for optimal: Follow a few thousand years of practical experience and put in a tension brace (lower outside corner to top hinge-side corner - opposite what you are going for, which is a compression brace) Go with the past few hundred years and make it a turnbuckle. The best form of compression brace "in plane" is none of the above, and has a point ...


15

You don't have a centre point, but you can have a perimeter grid marked. In its simplest form, the equation of a circle is derived from Pythagoras' theorem. https://www.mathopenref.com/coordbasiccircle.html That shows a centre point with + and - coordinates. But if you use tape measures to mark out a square around your rock pile (or a 50 feet line marked at ...


13

"Stand back I'm going to try maths" (misquoted from xkcd) r = 50 cos(θ) This polar plot defines a circle of radius 25 centred at the point (25,0) This assumes that you can set up one point "G" 25 feet from the assumed centre of the rocks. Measure the angle θ and calculate r = 50×cos(θ). Measure that distance from the G in the direction ...


11

Building parts, building tools, building techniques, and building skills are all based on square walls. With building parts, you have things like bricks with 4 sides, wood sheathing with straight edges, not to mention studs, drywall, and most other building materials with factory edges. With tools, framing squares, levels, speed squares, and corner tools for ...


9

Approximate solution: Assuming it's a steady pile of rocks on a level field: use the whole pile of rocks as the center point. Take a rope, make it into a loop that has approximately the diameter of your circle (plus a bit extra) and trace out the circle. It won't be perfect, as your pile of rocks most likely doesn't have a perfectly circular cross-section, ...


8

I live in an area with at least 3 or 4 N-gon (not necessarily octagon) houses. I've been inside one and, as a house geek, asked the owners plenty of questions. Here's what I picked up: They love the house It is FAR larger than it looks from the outside. Like most houses in the neighborhood, this is in the 2000-2800 ft² range. Cabinetry wasn't a problem. ...


8

The full basement may cost 3 times what the corresponding slab size may cost from a concrete perspective. But you have to also consider the cost per square foot to build the structure that covers the slab/basement. If you double your slab size you need twice as large of structure to cover it. On the other hand the structure footprint is the same size whether ...


7

I agree with others... the amount of custom work required is going to obliterate your budget. Custom-cut flooring, custom-cut drywall, custom wood framing, custom kitchen. Everything will be a hand-done one-off. I wouldn't be surprised if the final cost were double what you'd pay for a square house of comparable footage, and take a lot longer to build. If ...


7

Many things are built for a variety of uses. By nature, it cannot be optimized for every use. Compromises are required. That is not a defect; the manufacturer needs to balance all uses of the panel and build something that is ideal for most uses. In particular, the electrician's job can be compromised more, since electricians are professionals who can ...


6

It seems like you are actually asking several questions here, so I'll break down my answer: Is spruce appropriate? short answer: yes. A softwood like spruce will be relatively inexpensive, and plenty strong enough if you use thick enough pieces. Be aware that it may dent more easily than a hardwood. For a project like this, almost any kind of wood will be ...


5

Sure, it's done all the time. Thickness of the wall will likely be determined by the required vent size. With two toilets, two tubs and four sinks, I think you'll likely have to go to a 2x6 wall if you go with a single vent stack, but you'd have to run the numbers. I did run into a code issue with drains T'ing into the main vertical stack at the same ...


5

Unfortunately, as with most questions like this, you're going to have to talk to an engineer. A bunch of amateur DIYers on the internet, is not the proper resource for this type of information. You're making a major structural change to a building, and you don't want it to cause property damage or personal injury. The "correct" and responsible thing to do,...


5

If you were my client and I was taking money for your project, I'd put wood on a metal substructure, have wheels on the ends, and make sure the posts were extremely well stuck in the ground. (You might be able to skimp a little on the post as long as the wheels are in contact with the ground at all points in the arc, but the other two points would be non-...


5

As a HVAC service professional I wouldn't box the condenser with anything, this is problematic in multiple ways. If you want the system to remain problem free you must consider the service it will receive throughout its service life. With that being said, the 2 foot or 18" rule also would not suffice. I would recommend a single fence 4' from the ...


4

It's called terazzo: The basic process is: add your 'sparkle' substance as aggregate (glass is a typical option) pour concrete after concrete sets, you use a diamond grinder to expose the top layer of aggregate


4

If you don't care about leaks (or want drainage, so the dog is drier) forming the rim, pouring the rim, and then pouring the central slab is similar to whats typically done in a house basement. The joint between the rim and the slab will generally leak. If you pour a slab and then pour the raised edges on top, expect failure - if to scale, those are very ...


4

You'll need more detailing No longer can you consider structure, sheathing, cladding, and finish as the only elements of an exterior wall. You'll need to have several more wall detail drawings: First and foremost, you'll need to detail the wall cross-section or stackup. This shows how the wall is insulated, where the barrier layers are put, and the ...


4

Here is the website that the video came from. tinker-fun.com/DigitalLEDStairlighting Note that this DIY project requires electronics and software knowledge. The website has fairly detailed hardware instructions. The designer has not posted the full software yet. Pieces of the software are available from various open sources.


4

You could use GPS to do this - set up a series of waypoints on the circle, take a receiver to each waypoint, spray the ground, connect the dots. There is probably an app you can do that with on a smartphone, does not happen to be one I've had need of. For increasing levels of precision if a phone proves insufficient, there are fancier grades of GPS units.


4

Assume that one cannot climb on the rocks, e.g., the rocks are too slippery or are dangerously sharp, or it is taboo (thought to displease vindictive local gods), or the Russians have smeared them with Novichok. . . but it is possible and acceptable to pass a line over the rocks without touching them. Two people take a 50 ft line (or a measuring tape) with a ...


4

If you have at least a third person to hand (ideally four people), I suggest a variation of Jim Stewart's answer, but without any calculations. As with Jim's answer, have two people hold a rope/line with a plumb-bob above the desired centre-point. The length of this main line isn't critical: its purpose is not to measure anything but just to maintain the ...


4

Take a piece of rope that is at least 2 * pi * 25 = 157.1 ft long. Leave enough at one end to tie a knot, and mark the location that is 157.1 ft from that point. Lay the rope around the rocks and tie the two ends together at the marked points, so that you have a rope with circumference of 157.1 feet. If you have helpers, let everyone take a section of the ...


4

Remove the cladding. For a side yard the compressor units are not so ugly. They're hidden from the back by the wider rear of the house. You can put a small attractive privacy panel facing the front, if these can be seen from the road, to make that view more attractive. The side view doesn't matter. The cage is doing more harm than good, and IMO the ...


3

To answer your questions in reverse order: 3) Install your floor coverings first. It will go faster and easier if you have no obstacles to work around. You can always cover the new floor with tarps if you need to paint, drywall, etc. in the future. 2) If you need to lower the height of the cabinets ,as you noted, the toe-kick can be sawed off so as to ...


3

Find the center of gravity, which in a rectangular prism, will be located at x/2, y/2, z/2. The box will tip when the center of gravity moves outside the footprint of the box. (or just look at the intersection of diagonals) Or, if you like, when the grey line in the diagram below passes vertical. Adding weight to the bottom will lower the center of ...


3

If it's on slab, it's not exactly a basement. I think what you are actually asking for is 'studio space'. As Michael Karas, the concrete contractor is correct...the more concrete you use (ie, full basement) the more the concrete will cost. But the more slab you use, the bigger the footprint of the house, which will cost more in framing, roofing, etc. The ...


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