6

It's the backside of a plaster wall that was applied to metal mesh as the backing material. Basically, they put up something like chicken wire and apply plaster to that to form the wall. The other material around the pipes is likely some sort of putty, like duct seal or plumber's putty (looks like plumber's putty to me). It's impossible to know if any of ...


3

Here's an example using my own house, a ~50'x25' rancher. I used 2800 Kw-hrs of electricity for heating (heat pump) over a 30 day period of 868 deg days. That converts to 9.6x10^6 BTUs. I am going to assume that the overall efficiency of the heat pump was 1 over that period, which had a average outside temperature of 36 deg F. Dividing by 868 gives me 11,...


3

There's one big flaw in this strategy, which is that air leaks completely foil the exercise. R is the resistance to heat conduction, not the overall efficiency. Airflow is not conduction. If you have a leaky fireplace or bad windows or poor seals around all your outlets or you open doors during the test your calculation will be wildly skewed. A better ...


3

Put a thermal film on the skylight windows, let light through but reflect heat. Specified this for some of our triple glazing but the coatings were directly applied to the glass, you will need to either source sticky film or replace the glass units.


3

The corrosion/patina on the copper might seem like a bad thing because you're used to rust on steel, but it's not the same process. Rust on steel doesn't form a good bond on the metal, it expands, and it flakes off, exposing more steel that then rusts and flakes off, etc. It's a destructive process. Copper an aluminum corrode much, much slower because the ...


2

You are going to have to figure out how to keep the foam out of the boxes. Once it cures you are fine. You will have to use the low expanding stuff and keep it from entering the back tabs. The fronts we saran wrap and rubber band. The back tabs are not easy to block. I don't really understand the logistics you have going on here too... You have the ...


2

It's probably rockwool or mineral wool.


2

The insulation the contractor is referring to, is the insulation on the heat pump refrigerant lines. * This is not the fiberglass or rockwool insulation that homes have to keep out the outside cold/hot. That would not normally exist between interior spaces, anyway. It's a tubular pipe insulation that goes around the pipes. It works best if it is a vapor ...


1

Unfortunately some old products from Johns Manville did contain asbestos . But repeating comments , the only way to know is to have it tested.


1

We have sheets of neoprene insulation as thin as 1/8” all you need to do in reality is prevent condensation even spray foam in the hole allowing it to encapsulate the lines will be enough. Don’t worry about your tape skills you are really just preventing uv exposure as this breaks down the insulation. Tape also seals from air movement again helping to ...


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