6

2*1x or 1*2x would be the same, but 2*1x with an air gap would be better than 2x by itself. Same principal as double pane glass; trapped air slows the transfer of heat.


3

An ABC extinguisher would be my choice I carry one on my truck and 2 in my boat. They will put out everything but electrical & magnesium, kill the electrical first then the fire will not be electrical. Magnesium takes a special chemical in the service it was called purple K . ABC will put most things out quickly, last week we had a Fire In a field just ...


3

You do need to adjust between the different units. To work out the thickness of insulation needed for 0.30 W/m²·K you can do 0.018W/m·K / 0.30W/m²·K = 0.06m. So you will need 60mm sheet of insulation to get that target with the foam (note that this is the thickness of the foam, not the combined foam+plasterboard). Dimensional analysis is useful for a ...


3

Build a frame with tracks for the filters to slide into. Use U channel for the tracks. Get 4 60.75" pieces of 0.5x1x0.5 U channel and cut notches in the sides at 20.25" and 40.5" Fold them into U shapes then join them together to make a frame. Something like this Picasso. the U channels can be connected together using rivets or welding or ...


2

Blown in cellulose can be quite effective if all air gaps are located and sealed with expanding foam for this purpose. Look for gaps around light boxes/electrical, fan vents, and those in corners. Unless sealed, you'll lose heating and waste money. If the previous fiberglass batts had dark marks, they generally indicate an air leak. You can lay insulation ...


2

Looks like concrete fill (a gypsum fiberglass product). As Ecnerwal stated you can't really be sure without sending it to the lab. Usually affordable ~$50 to test a sample. Bag it, drop it off and wait for the results for piece of mind.


2

You could use rigid styrofoam boards cut to the size you need and use a "friction fit" cut to hold them in place Those panels are easy to cut with a box cutter knife and are rated at an R5/inch. They are sold at most home stores (orange or blue) for about $20 to $25 a 4X8' sheet. This may be a better choice than a water heater blanket.


1

The answer is no. To be considered a finished basement there must be a wall covering around the "finished" part of the basement. If it were just concrete, well that is an unfinished basement. I have seen a lot of goofy things done including adding a 1/2" of plaster to all of the outer walls, putting drywall on basically shims, adding faux ...


1

Finish it anyway you want. Attaching fasteners to the wall for hanging TV's pullup bars, vaults for your gold bullion collection won't be a problem. You may want to paint the wall. Black maybe


1

Why not use Roxul ComfortBoard instead of the polystyrene? It is fire proof. Alternatively you could make a sandwich with the comfortboard on the roomside and the foil faced EPS on the other. Are you trying to achieve the highest r-value? what r-value per inch is the foil faced EPS you are considering? How many inches do you want this removable insulation ...


1

Almost anything "could be asbestos" and without lab testing you don't know. That eyeballs to be Homosote®, a soft cellulose sheet product (can be used as an inexpensive bulletin board - tacks go in easily) as opposed to the more common hard asbestos-cement boards, but it "could" be some softer grade of asbestos for insulation purposes. Or ...


1

I don’t think you need a vapor barrier in the bottom of the joist space. The finish paint coat should suffice. Also, caulking at joints, etc. is not required if the entire ceiling is painted (it may take several coats to achieve the perm rating you’re looking for). BTW, If you live in an environment where summer and winter change temperatures, then it gets ...


1

No, I do not think a vapor barrier should follow the profile of ceiling joists. Condensation occurs when vapor reaches its dew point. Placing a portion of a vapor barrier on one side of an insulation space and not on another side (where the wood joists occur), will stop the vapor from penetrating the insulation space but not the wood joist space. Wood is ...


1

you can use this far better frost avoidance and cold draft reduction . good to -40’C https://www.homerepairtutor.com/how-to-weatherize-windows-with-plastic-film-insulation/ I made insert frames and heat shrunk onto then remove and store in spring. But getting an air flow seal is best. They will inflate if not tight. Easy to install with a hair dryer, not ...


1

30 degrees is fine, otherwise you'd be seeing melted polystyrene containers everywhere, especially around coffee machines.. The sheets can soak up water so it will need water proofing.


1

I would use "duct seal". It's a putty-like material that's a bit sticky. You'll find it in the electrical department. It's much more robust than foam. Caulk would be difficult to work with on a gap that big and would be more difficult to remove if you had to do any modification later. You could probably get good results with silicone, though. I'd ...


1

A window tint film would be a great option. Make sure you pick one that goes to the trouble of publishing their solar energy rejection performance -- any which don't might reasonably be assumed not to perform very well. You could choose an architectural film (ie designed for buildings) or an automotive film. One brand I can heartily recommend is Solar Gard. ...


1

Thermal draperies may be the best option. They can be opened when needed. The fabric is available to make your own at JoAnne Fabric, but ready mades are inexpensive and readily available.


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