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The numbers I found for your area are actually R30-R60, so more than R30 would be ideal as air conditioning is expensive and the one-time cost of better insulation can easily pay for itself. How deep are your rafters? R values of common materials can be found in this chart from greenbuildermedia.com: To this chart, I'll just add that if you're wealthy there ...


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I'm unsure how to proceed First find the make and model number of the range. Next, Use the internet to search for the make and model of the range to see if you can find a service manual or user manual in order to see if there is a diagram of the parts. If you can find the name of the part then you will be able to search the internet for an appliance parts ...


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Yes, cold climates require the insulation in walls to dry towards the outside through breathing gaps in the sheathing, with a vapour barrier separating the insulation from the warm inside moisture. Roofs are similar, where ventilation is provided through soffits and ridge or gable vents. Also, the airflow from soffit to gable provides for cooling (!) of the ...


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Austin follows the 2015 International Building Code and it has local amendments that are published on the city website here. There are Austin-specific amendments to the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Before you finalize your plans, it would be prudent to refer to the 2015 IECC and check on the Austin amendments. Nothing worse than following ...


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I have resolved cases like this (in Minnesota, no less) in two ways: Keep the "hot roof" but add polyiso insulation, as you described. In our case we put down two layers of ~3" panels (which gets you more than R-25), then OSB. Obviously it took some long fasteners to do that. I'm not sure why it was suggested that you put down OSB first. Of ...


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I know this question is a few years old, but another option is to insulate the underside of the roof (and maybe gable ends?) with closed cell spray foam. This is more expensive, but it will convert your attic space into something more comfortable and lessen the importance of air leaks and insulation between the rest of your house and the attic. I'm in a ...


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Based on the word foam I would imagine he means the stuff similar to great stuff which does have a higher R value. Is the pipe partially insulated? I'd be worried about the fact that its directly on the drywall that's next to the un-insulated area. The down side to the foam if something goes wrong you won't be able to get in.


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Two separate issues here: Attics Get Hot! This is a fact of life. Attics heat up from the sun all day long. Color and type of roof can make some difference (reflection vs. absorption), but it is quite normal for an attic to get really hot. The usual solution is an attic fan. This can be thermostatically controlled so it only runs when hot. For an attic fan ...


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The vapour barrier's task is to keep inside moisture away from the insulation and framing where it could condensate and create mold. In your proposal your hot/cold interface induces condensation on the side of the vapour barrier where the insulation is. However, you want the condensation and insulation on opposite sides of the barrier. Your sunroom floor can ...


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