3

I have successfully and very gingerly broken the interior side of a double pane window and removed the shards and chips with pliers and fingers--again, gingerly. The stain/fog inside had made them look unattractive and blurred the view. I hit carefully with a hammer in a lower corner, and started pulling from there. However, the inside of the outer pane--...


3

It's a vapor barrier, but a poorly installed one... maybe just because of the window. This room looks like it's going to be a bathroom of some sort.


2

It's a very straightforward calculation, though parts of the industry prefer to pretend otherwise. Also, math is involved, and that tends to scare off people with math scars from school. Dumbed down approaches give dumbed down, generalized answers. First, establish if you are dealing with Metric or "English" (BTU based) R values. They are similar but the ...


2

If you pulled a permit for this work, you should not proceed until you have your framing, rough electrical, and rough plumbing inspections signed off. Depending on the work, there may be more inspections you should wait for (i.e. rafter tie-down straps, rough mechanical...) your building permit likely has these listed in order on the signoff card, or just ...


2

This may get you on the right track: "The Forty-Eight Insulations Company was founded in 1923 in East Aurora, Illinois. Forty-Eight sought to produce high-quality insulation." "Forty-Eight used asbestos until 1982, long after it was known that the mineral was toxic. The Forty-Eight Insulation Qualified Settlement Trust was created to compensate the victims ...


2

You can have blown-in insulation added after the fact. They will drill small, maybe 1-1/2" holes in the stucco, one above and one below the fire blocks in each section between the studs and blow in the chopped fiberglass material. then they patch the stucco and if you have some of the original leftover paint, they will repaint it. If not they try to match it,...


2

Yes, there are energy efficiency code standards for residential buildings. The Code is divided into 1) one and two family structures, and 2) three or more residential structures. (There are also energy standards for manufactured housing, log homes, commercial, institutional, etc. too, but that does not apply here.) I will reference one and two family ...


1

I want to preface my answer with this, you cannot definitively say if there is or is not asbestos in a space through a picture, as it requires a microscope. My assumption is based on research and your initial statement about the age of your home as well as personal experience and research. That said, chances are high that there would be asbestos in there. ...


1

The glass is usually adhered very strongly to the seal. Any modifications to allow venting or convert it to single pane will cut its effective R-value down to that of a single pane window. If you know the brand of the window, you can order a replacement pane - I paid around $85 to replace one of mine a couple years back. It's not cheap, but probably worth ...


1

I have done it accidentally. It is a full length window in a porch door, so the double glass is not essential. Apparently a leaf blower blew something into it and broke the outer glass ; I discovered it after cleaning the yard. As a door it is safety glass it broke into tiny pieces. When I saw the small hole I put tape on the rest of the glass so that tiny ...


1

There are different profiles of duct available. In height restricted areas you can switch to a rectangular flat profile which might give you the ability to better insulate.


1

R15 is the best you can do in fiberglass and mineral wool for a 2*4 wall. Iirc you could get close to R-30 with closed cell spray foam, but that's $$$. That black is probably dust. Unless you see black staining on the studs where it was removed from its probably not a sign of a serious problem. Still, it suggests that your wall voids are not air-tight, ...


1

The black is dust that is deposited by air leaks. The best building framework is passive house and the perfect wall which orders your priorities. The first is liquid water, the seconds is air, the third is vapor and the last is insulation. If you've gone to the trouble to open all the exterior walls to increase your insulation, I am going to assume that ...


1

Look for roi on replacement windows and doors. Here is one such article Also, “are high efficiency windows worth it” led me to this article. Also: energy.gov and an interesting story from NPR


1

Once the vapor barrier or plastic is installed/stapled over the faced insulation while forgetting to destroy/slash insulation facing underneath, three likely possibilities exist for destroying/slashing the insulation facing beneath the plastic or vapor barrier. 1) Possible to pull-up the vapor barrier at the top and bottom, only destroying the vapor barrier ...


1

Placement of vapor barrier depends on location. In cold climate you place it on the inside before insulation. So from the inside out, the layers are typically drywall, poly, insulation, sheathing, water resistive barrier (house wrap), rain screen, cladding.


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