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Generally, it's safe to be in an attic with fiberglass insulation without a mask. Is it a good idea? No. It can get into your lungs and cause the coughing you're experiencing and can also irritate your throat. the coughing you're experiencing is probably a combination of the fiberglass and the dust that settles from the venting of the attic. Do yourself a ...


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As @JACK points out, do yourself a favour and wear a mask. Small particles of the insulation along with dust can be flying around and that will get worse whilst moving about in the loft/attic space. When wearing a mask you will be surprised how much is stuck to the filter or mask itself after a short while and that will be in your lungs and throat without ...


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More importantly than the rubbing is the ventilation. Many heating and air conditioning systems rely on the space between the door and floor for the return air. that's why there is usually a good space between them. If you have that type of system and you block that space, your system will not operate as designed and you won't get the heat or AC that you ...


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Depending on how much of the pile is being rubbed it could wear off some of the pile. It will also cause more wear if it's a berber type of carpet or some other type of looped pile where the door could wear off the top fibers. What it will cause, especially on pile carpets is a 90 or 180 degree arc in the carpet where it rubs. However if it's not a deep rub ...


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Adding insulation to the floor will definitely reduce the sound to some extent, but that extent is hard to know without knowing everything about your exact situation. Your raised floor is acting kind of like a drumhead, amplifying the vibrations from your exercise machine. So the insulation can absorb some of that energy, but the sound will be reduced mostly ...


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Fiberglass insulation helps more to reduce high frequencies than low. Since the sound made by exercise machines is primarily low frequency (i.e., dull thuds), such as the impact of feet, he insulation would not be very effective. Some ways to decrease low frequency noise include: Increase mass of surfaces: Add a layer of board to the floor. Increase ...


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Normally a shed does not have an insulated floor but since yours is going to be insulated i would not leave it open for critters to nest in or chew up and take away for a nests. I would cover the bottom of your joists with treated plywood or Metal lath. The plywood keeps out bugs and squirrels etc, the lath keep out only things larger than the opening of ...


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Regular glass Not laminate or tempered Yes, you can apply films to it


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For a larger drywall patch, say 2'x2', here's what I have done... It's a little time consuming but fairly clean. I cut 90% of the square hole out with a repic saw and leave enough uncut for the drywall to not fall out (making a huge mess). I have someone hold a shop vac close to the saw to get the dust. Then I get 2 pieces of wood similar in size to that of ...


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Many of have worked in attics without masks over the years at hundreds or thousands of times the exposure you are getting but I won’t say it’s not a health issue but I am not aware of any issues with such a light exposure. Other areas to check include the duct work. Metal trunk ducts usually have a fiberglass blanket that is foil backed. If someone tweaked ...


1

The layer fields on the professional Ubakus-Site allows to input also metal foils, so it should take the reflections into account. But those reflections do only have a tiny effect if the subject is building insulation. Much more important is the fact that metal is a barrier for waterdamp. And in general, wet insulation material decreases the insulation ...


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Fiberglass itself will not support mold. Mold needs 3 things: Mold spores Moisture Organic matter (i.e. food) With fiberglass itself you have #1 and #2 but are missing #3 since fiberglass is glass and not organic. Note that paper backed fiberglass insulation adds the organic matter component but most is treated to inhibit mold growth. Check with your ...


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This question could get flagged as opinion based but here goes anyway. I live in South Florida and have been in hundreds of attics with fiberglass insulation and have never seen any problems. Yes, there is a lot of humidity but if the attics are vented with soffits, etc., then the humidity doesn't cause a moisture problem. I had a roof leak and some of my ...


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Any sort of outdoor space we put insulation in we put a couple layers of chicken wire under the joists to not only keep creatures out but to keep insulation in place. It really is that easy.


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Don't leave it open, like Alaska Man said. My son has a sunroom that was built atop existing framing for a deck. The underneath of the floor was insulated, just like you're describing. He had all the problems Alaska Man mentioned, until he finally got around to covering the underside of the joists and closing off any openings.


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If you use anything Use foam, fiberglass gets its R value in the volume. The block wall actually has an R value, I think when I poured my shop walls there was foam on outside and inside and I think the wall was rated at R 50. Since you have a solid wall I might just have an air space. As 1” of foam is expensive for the R value and the air space is actually ...


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In Oregon you are primarily a heating climate. The typically thing to do is to have a vapor barrier on the warm side. Normally you insulate between the studs and then put 6mil poly and then drywall. The moisture in the air will then not hit a cold surface as your drywall is on the warm side and the air can't get to the cold exterior sheathing. Now as ...


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I don't think you can attach drywall over (flexible) plastic foam. When my house was built I put in the wall insulation; I put the paper-facing of the fiberglass batts ( flanges) on the 2 X 4 wall studs. The dry wall guys said not to put anything on the 2 X 4 surfaces , they wanted to place the dry wall directly on the bare wood. The dry-wall installers were ...


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We live in the same area, you will want something that will allow moisture out But stop air flow (vapor barrier). We do have issues with mold here. on several houses I have found the bad stuff (Stachybotrys chartarum) and 2 have been when the home owner tried to seal the walls In similar era homes. In this era home there are normally a lot of air leaks ...


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If your only concerned about critters, depending on the actual size of the gap (mouse sized to raccoon sized) a "combination of chicken wire-like mesh and rolled fiberglass insulation pressed gently into gap should work. I wouldn't spray foam alone, critters of all kinds could still chew and peck through it. This is a sure sign that the roof line/rooms are ...


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The soffits need to be cleared of their insulation. Otherwise you risk having mold forming due to the humidity not being able to get out. There should be vent baffles installed to allow the air to continue to flow over the insulation. You may have an HVAC contractor install additional events to push more air into the area.


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