39

I've been making a rink in my yard for over 20 years. I don't use plastic or boards. To my mind that gives you the nasty task of getting up wet muddy stuff in the spring, putting it away somewhere etc. We use nothing but snow and water to build our rink, and we can have it whatever size and shape we want as a result. When the rink melts, it melts, and the ...


15

My suggestion is to add to the size of the concrete drive way in the following manner: This gives you the option of backing up out of the car port in the new area toward the rear yard. Then you can drive in a forward direction which would be far easier to navigate by the truck and the corner of the house. Additionally the part added onto the side nearer ...


15

User Matthew is correct that a nipple extractor may help you salvage the tee. You need to check the threads in the Tee for any damage, since if the threads are scratched you may get a leak. If the tee is badly damaged If the tee can’t be reused, you will need to replace it. This part is readily available at any home-improvement store (but see below). ...


14

It will smoke badly and may indeed foul the plug(s). It will be less of a problem if you only use a SMALL amount of mix fuel in each tank, so the oil is more diluted. IMHO, IME, if you use THAT little fuel in your weed whacker, you probably should sell it and buy an electric one, either corded or rechargeable. If you don't want to do that, then you should ...


13

You can go at it with a sledgehammer (or a smaller hand sledge) and a star drill, and then drive wedges into the holes (or if you are patient, fill the holes with water and let them freeze in the winter.) There are special wedges designed for use in round holes for splitting rock (feathers and wedges seems to find them). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


12

It shows a lack of care for the home. Bushes against the home or a wood fence are an entrance point for pests (termites, ants, etc). It also adds more wear and tear from abrasion that you wouldn't have from just the sun and rain. And for a buyer, a bush growing against the home could be hiding a problem. So if you want to make it look as if you've been ...


11

I think you may have a problem brewing there. I have never heard of bricks being glued in a situation like this. Normally paving bricks will be set on a compacted base of stone dust and very fine packing gravel, then the joints are filled with fine mason sand. Mortar is rarely used, especially in cold climates as it will crack with any movement associated ...


11

My house has the main electrical come in below grade (built in 1967 before they knew better). I would get some small leakage coming in around the conduit where it came through the concrete and later hydro-static pressure pushing water right up into the main breaker box which, though inside, was also below grade. With a un-floored crawl space, some water ...


11

Sounds like you got "Crusher Run", when you wanted "Washed Stone". This site has a good description of some different types. Crusher Run Washed stone It's used as a base for driveways and roads, but is typically compacted and covered by another material (asphalt for example). You may have been thinking of something more like pea gravel, or similar. ...


11

You say mower in the body of your question, but the title could attract people looking for answer about adding it to their cars. Your car or truck will easily consume leftover 2-stroke fuel. I typically don't do more than 1/2 gallon of 2-stroke fuel to 10 gallons in my tank. The small amount of bad gas and/or 2-stroke oil will be diluted. Your car doesn'...


11

I'd leave the driveway as it is. I'm not a fan of half-acre concrete slabs. I'd install some "rumble strip" edging pavers or small boulders (partially embedded in the ground) to give drivers a haptic warning that they're in danger of encroaching on the architecture.


11

There is a tool called a nipple extractor. It can be used to remove broken threaded parts just like this. You can find one online or from any irrigation supply or DIY retailer likely for under $15. You firmly press it into the broken part and turn to remove it.


10

I would go the other way from Michael Karas. I'd eliminate the double S-curve, and make the entry to the carport a steady curve of same radius. That would cause it to miss the house entirely, and move "where the driveway meets the highway" west a bit. And get the ugly driveway away from the front of the house. Add a curb and you shouldn't have any house ...


10

Sounds like you need a firmer subbase under your sand to spread the load across a wider area. I would follow the same procedure as for laying a wider area such as a patio. It seems like a lot of effort for a small area like the one you have but unless the ground underneath is already very hard and level, the pavers are going to settle unevenly and/or slide ...


9

It will be 100% completely fine. I have a 2 stroke racing off road dirtbike that requires 93 octane fuel and a 32:1 mix with racing oil. And frequently, that is the only gas can I have on hand because my other yard maintenance equipment runs on diesel. I have a push mower that I use to do small areas of my yard, where the tractor with the 60 inch deck ...


9

Whether you add on extra concrete or add rumble strips - both really good ideas - I would protect that corner of the house. My neighbor has very very similar rebar sunflower lawn art in their yard as the picture below. You station 4-5 of these around that edge and your house is well protected. If someone is backing on - they will actually hit something ...


8

There exist expanding compounds like this one: Ecobust, which are poured into predrilled holes and expand as they dry, splitting the stone (or concrete). It does require a power tool, unless there are already some cracks in your boulder, but a cordless hammer drill should be sufficient.


8

If it is a nice looking rock or has a particular shape, place it on Craig's list as a free item. I listed four 5" Blue Spruce trees I needed to remove to make way for a garage. Gone over the weekend and I didn't have to lift a hand.


8

I'll throw an answer out there, answering my own question but not necessarilly the correct answer. Remove the existing driveway and build a new one that makes more sense: This has the upside of removing the driveway entrance from right in front of the house which I hate. Now I would be able to plant a big tree here! Downside is I will need to hire a crew ...


6

The usual purpose of a curtain drain is to divert (under)groundwater away from a structure. The only reason to not cover it with fabric and a few inches of soil is to capture surface drainage as well. If you need to capture surface drainage, then there must be a significant grading issue that is allowing surface water to stand near the structure. Such a ...


6

The wires do indeed go to the sprinkler system. There turned out to be a 4th white wire I hadn't yet uncovered. The two sets provide the current to open control valves for the two zones on the other side of the driveway. I finally got input from a professional sprinkler repair company. They were baffled at first, because the pipes appear to go all the way ...


6

Move the driveway like this, plant some trees and shrubs in front of the house


6

Pressure-wash away the moss. Assess the integrity of the concrete. If it's sound, carry on. If not, abandon the project as there's no "cheapest" way of restoring it. Acid etch the concrete to make it completely clean for recoating. Skim any divots with vinyl repair compound to make them flat. Commission a court finisher to apply the appropriate court ...


5

IMHO that's much too small in diameter for comfort. Possibly also for safety in that material. The "safe working load" listed is almost certainly not one involving using the rope for supporting people or things above people, where it's typical to derate (or over-size) by a factor of 7 or more. IMPE a 1 inch/25mm to 1.5 inch/37mm diameter rope is more ...


5

Definitely run the largest conduit you can obtain across the driveway. Possibly two or three or four parallel runs -- you don't know if you will eventually want to use one for low-voltage cabling, another to pass a water pipe through, etc. PVC conduit holds up very well underground and is relatively cheap even in large diameters. You can put conduit ...


4

I would definitely be worried about remembering to drain the valve, and it's also a pain that you'd have to drain it inside. Your second option is pretty good though, otherwise. Another option, which is probably easier, would be to make up an adapter of sorts for the outside. Take a regular spigot, attach to a 90 degree elbow, and put a hose adapter on the ...


4

without a lip you'd want to use concrete adhesive on each row. check your local code regulations. Typically a wall of a certain height has to be run through an engineer first. In my area I believe the height was 3'. Anything higher I'd have to hire an engineer. In our case, we had a large amount of earth to retain, but decided it was best to use a tiered ...


4

By itself I would not rely on it, as this is lava rock which isn't the strongest - it's prone to breakage.. However, if you cover it with stone dust to help fill in the voids which will help prevent shifting (which encourages breaking) and then solidly compact it with a power compactor, then follow up by covering it with a layer of sand on top, compacted ...


4

I hardly think it's Love Canal so I'm unclear why you are scared of it. Sounds like a hole in the ground with tree stumps, et al slowly rotting away. Dump some dirt on and grade it; repeat as needed. Since it appears that you have left it for a long time and it's gotten bad, you will probably need machinery (bulldozer or track loader) to do the dirt the ...


4

Building 23' of retaining walls is not a small task. This is a giant undertaking. So be forewarned. :) As stormy noted, 4' is typically the height you can go without having to trigger an engineering sign-off. However, some areas may also have a total height requirement as well. Personally, if I was buying a house with 6 levels of 4' retaining walls, I'd ...


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