30

Obviously, safety considerations like isolating that circuit are paramount, and note that even if that circuit's breaker is off, then the neutral touching earth can still trip the Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker... Find the socket / box that that wire goes to, disconnect it, then pull it out from the other end (which you need to find - either in the roof ...


30

I would remove the hinge pins and unmount the door. Once removed, the hardware should be visible to remove the bolt assembly.


20

You'd do this like you would add any other new window. Find the studs, choose a location, cut square holes in the drywall on both sides, cut sections out of the intervening studs to make room for the new window, and frame the new window properly like this: Then you would flash the rough opening's sill with self-adhering membrane and install the window just ...


15

Given the size and location of the wire, It looks like you hit the range feed which may draw upto 50 amps. Such high current applications require greater care in making connections such as splices. in general there are two safe approaches to repairing this damage. The easiest but most expensive (since you have conduit and assuming that it is continuous) is ...


11

Ceiling Fans Ceiling fans are most often installed to help keep cool in the summer but they can also help circulate the hot air in the winter. Some have adjustable blades to make them more effective for this use.


11

Insulated crimped connections are allowed in the UK, and considered maintenance-free so they can be concealed. A proper ratchet crimper is essential. The whole should then be wrapped in self-amalgamating tape.


9

Even 'half bricks' up 15' vertical is going to be a massive amount of weight that may require additional support underneath. In addition, splitting bricks in half is no easy task. You're going to end up paying a whole lot in labor to do that. Instead, you'd want to use a brick veneer. Which is 'real' brick but very thin: They go on essentially like you ...


8

The differences between the types of doors is pretty obvious in use: SOLID CORE DOORS Mimics the appearance and feel of a solid wood door Muffles sound better Heavier and slams better HOLLOW CORE DOORS Lighter and easier to handle than a real wood door Cheaper? Jeld-wen says: Hollow core doors are a good choice for areas where sound transmission is less ...


8

I know you already accepted, but I disagree with @bib on a few points that don't fit in a comment, so I'll provide my own answer. So long as you build a solid frame and connect it well, once installed there is really no chance of existing drywall being "crushed" by the frame. To crush the connecting drywall after installation, you'd need a very serious ...


7

A DIY repair may be possible, though ugly, even if the wires are trapped so you cannot pull through any extra length or a replacement length of cable. Attach a 1-gang box to the wall in exactly the right place so you can cut the cable and bend the ends upwards into that box from below on opposite sides. Join Live to Live, Neutral to Neutral and Earth to ...


7

Shims. Go to the local home center and get some of the (free?) laminate counter top samples in the kitchen cabinet section, they are about 3x5 inches. I then cut them to the same size as the hinge plate. Remove the hinge, place it on the sample and trace around it, it does not need to perfect but it should not be bigger then the hinge. I cut them with tin ...


7

Those bottom corners are the only problematic locations, right? Referring to Page #7 of these Jeld-Wen installation Instructions which I recently followed. You are missing the foam wedges Go to the millwork desk of your local big box home improvement store and ask if they have any extra they could give you. I'm sure Amazon carries them as well. It looks ...


6

Why? You are going to have to seal and finish the edges where the new wall meets the existing walls and ceiling. To do that, you are going to compromise the area of the existing drywall. Why not trim out a channel in the existing drywall the width of your new studs so that you can get good, tight firm attachment points. The problem with butting framing up ...


6

Utterly standard - the subfloor goes on, then the walls go up. Doing it any other way is rather fraught with difficulties to no benefit. You've got the general idea, though it is not really critical on the cross-joist direction (as pictured) and often the parallel to the joist direction is solved by putting blocking between the exposed joist and the hidden ...


6

It looks like the caulk there is old and cracked. Scrape it all out so you have a good surface to work with and use a premium acrylic caulk. DAP extreme stretch or 230 would be good choices if you dont want to work with silicone. If the gaps are larger than 1/4" you should use window expanding foam or backer rod first to fill the gap before caulking. ...


5

Jack's answer is completely correct. I will simplify the answer with some easy advice. Use some acrylic painter's caulk in a caulking gun, never use a silicon based product in this situation. When you cut the tip, only cut off enough to leave about an 1/8 inch opening at the tip. You want to push out a very thin bead of caulk that can be "pushed" into the ...


5

If all interior walls or, if insulated exterior walls,no need to fill gap with anything. Just get your baseboard moldings up to finish the job


5

Another trick, actually a variation of that of @agentp, is to use wire mesh (also called hardware cloth) instead of a wood strip. Choose one with small holes, 1/8" if you can find it, 1/4" is real common in the building stores. It is particularly useful when the thickness of the material is thin (as in the case of interior hollow-core doors 1/8" luan or ...


5

This seems like a shopping question, and so would be considered off-topic.. That said, a web search for 'extension cord switch' produced a number of off-the-shelf results that look like they will do exactly what you're looking for. Add one or two regular extension cords if necessary for added length.


5

Unless your house is abnormally well built, a prybar applied at the strike plate will find enough flex in the frame to pop the door open. Otherwise see @mikes answer.


5

Sliding a cake knife, piece of plastic (credit card or similar) down at a 45 or 60 degree angle in the gap where the strike plate is, start above, while pushing gently on the door is usually enough to slide the plunger back and allow the door to open.


5

Cut a plug of wood to the height and width of the two mortises. Use pine and cut the depth so the plug stands slightly proud when set in the mortises. You want the mortises to be a single mortise so chisel out any partition. Cut the mortise to fit the plug. With a utility knife define the shape of the plug on the jamb. Cut away any parts that obstruct it's ...


5

Looks like caulk was applied once before and has cracked due to movement. You'll want to scrape that all away and apply new caulk. Silicone would work, but it's not paintable, so consider that.


4

If you're drilling within about an inch of a corner, then the drywaller may have put a corner bead there to protect it from damage. A corner bead is installed over drywall (and then covered over with mud and/or texture), so if you're hitting metal within the first eighth inch of drilling, that's probably it. I've been hitting metal around all of my windows; ...


4

I would not let a designer make these kind of decisions. A good architect, a builder, or a good general contractor would be your best bet. You could always bring in a city inspector and ask them for a few thoughts too. If money is no object than almost anything goes with a basement. You can basically put a wall anywhere as long as you aren't moving ...


4

Actually... On the bucket is says mix and apply before adding water. Videos are kak. I'm a trade qualified plasterer blh blah experience etc. What I do is read. Read the bucket, read the data sheets, read books about plaster publishd by plaster companies, read summaries and technical analysis of arbitration processes where products have failed. So ...


4

The other answers talk about the direct benefits. The question seems to imply an additional interest in the effect on resale value, so I'll try to focus on that. There are several aspects to resale value. One is things that are recognized by appraisers and tax officials as directly affecting the baseline market value. This is stuff like square footage, ...


4

You should be able to find a P-trap assembly available at any local hardware store. The horizontal section should attach directly to the drain line coming out of the wall, while the vertical end should accept the tail piece from the sink.


4

You'll need to install a drain assembly. In a bathroom, pop-up drain assemblies are common. Here's an image of the drain assembly, with all the parts labeled. (source: naturalhandyman.com) The tailpiece of the drain assembly, should attach to the trap assembly. If the trap is too low, an extension can be used. When installing the drain, put a bead of ...


4

Your local building code requirements hold sway, and I encourage you to review them prior to planning. That being said, many building codes specify a garage/home separation, but fall somewhat short of requiring a an actual fire rating. The separation has some requirements that provide more fire protection and exhaust protection than typical living space ...


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