29

Obviously, safety considerations like isolating that circuit are paramount, and note that even if that circuit's breaker is off, then the neutral touching earth can still trip the Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker... Find the socket / box that that wire goes to, disconnect it, then pull it out from the other end (which you need to find - either in the roof ...


20

You'd do this like you would add any other new window. Find the studs, choose a location, cut square holes in the drywall on both sides, cut sections out of the intervening studs to make room for the new window, and frame the new window properly like this: Then you would flash the rough opening's sill with self-adhering membrane and install the window just ...


16

Get a heavy stand Growing up, my dad had a traditional stand that looks something like this: That works for smaller trees as long as you can be sure that nobody (such as a child or pet) will disturb it. That's not at all a given. Remember that trees have extensive root systems that keep them grounded during windy periods and so it's important to get a ...


14

Given the size and location of the wire, It looks like you hit the range feed which may draw upto 50 amps. Such high current applications require greater care in making connections such as splices. in general there are two safe approaches to repairing this damage. The easiest but most expensive (since you have conduit and assuming that it is continuous) is ...


12

It looks like a doorbell to me. Can't be sure though unless you pop off the case, which should come off fairly easily if you pull it straight out from the wall.


11

Ceiling Fans Ceiling fans are most often installed to help keep cool in the summer but they can also help circulate the hot air in the winter. Some have adjustable blades to make them more effective for this use.


11

Insulated crimped connections are allowed in the UK, and considered maintenance-free so they can be concealed. A proper ratchet crimper is essential. The whole should then be wrapped in self-amalgamating tape.


10

I have always been pleased with Behr paints from the Home Depot, though I know they are a bit pricey. From my experience less expensive paints tend to have the following in common (and I'm sure this is by no means comprehensive) less covering ability ... the pigments used don't seem to be able to provide as good a barrier to bleed through from what's on ...


9

A router (along with a special guide) can be used to cut part of the inset you need, but is not the easiest tool to use if you are not experienced, and it does not cut square corners, which still require a chisel to finish. Using a chisel does take care and practice, but it is not beyond the reach of even an amateur if you are willing to do a test piece ...


9

Turn off the power at the panel for this circuit (flip the circuit breaker). Remove the cover plate from the switch. Test with a non-contact tester to make sure that there is no power in the circuit box. Unscrew the switch. Remove the two wires from the switch (unscrew or, if they are press in types, cut them close to the switch) Straighten the wires ...


9

Even 'half bricks' up 15' vertical is going to be a massive amount of weight that may require additional support underneath. In addition, splitting bricks in half is no easy task. You're going to end up paying a whole lot in labor to do that. Instead, you'd want to use a brick veneer. Which is 'real' brick but very thin: They go on essentially like you ...


8

If you don't have the proper structure under the area, you're not going to want to use full sized bricks for this project. Brick walls require proper concrete footings to support the massive amount of weight, if you don't have the ability to add the footings you won't be able to build a brick wall here. In situations like this, veneer will likely be your ...


7

My approach has been: Drop baseboards. Knock out a small hole behind the baseboard. Stick my iPhone in. Snap a bunch of photos with the flash on. If the photos aren't working well enough/providing enough coverage, I'll record a video with the flash on. This has been tremendously useful in working out where cables are and where they've been stapled to the ...


7

Microwave ovens do not generate heat themselves, but cause the food itself to heat up. As such there is not a lot of heat output from the unit, but there is expanding air as the food warms the air in the chamber. Reputable manufacturers are fairly conservative about their venting requirements. If you meet those requirements, you should be OK. Another ...


7

The differences between the types of doors is pretty obvious in use: SOLID CORE DOORS Mimics the appearance and feel of a solid wood door Muffles sound better Heavier and slams better HOLLOW CORE DOORS Lighter and easier to handle than a real wood door Cheaper? Jeld-wen says: Hollow core doors are a good choice for areas where sound transmission is ...


6

I'm going to presume you have a fairly standard type of christmas tree stand, like this one, however much of what I am saying applies to other sorts of standsthat rely on similar mechanics. Notice, at the bottom of the stand the little red trianglar tabs that stick up vertically? They are important in preventing your tree from tipping. Before tightening the ...


6

A DIY repair may be possible, though ugly, even if the wires are trapped so you cannot pull through any extra length or a replacement length of cable. Attach a 1-gang box to the wall in exactly the right place so you can cut the cable and bend the ends upwards into that box from below on opposite sides. Join Live to Live, Neutral to Neutral and Earth to ...


5

Consumer Reports does objective analysis of paints and stains every year. They test properties like how well it covers up what is underneath, resistance to fading, resistance to mildew, resistance to cleaners and scrubbing, etc. Behr is usually one of their top-rated brands. Other top picks are from Kilz, Glidden, and Benjamin Moore. Which one is "best" ...


5

Stephen has a great answer. One more thing: Better paints also 'flow' better off the brush or roller, making it much easier to get an even coat and retain detail. This is related to, but distinct from, coverage (you can get by with less paint).


5

I dunno, but if you can't rotate the tree once it's in the stand without fear of it toppling, you're doing something wrong. Make sure the stand is appropriately sized for the tree. A 9-foot tree is quite big, and will need an extra-large stand of some sort. Don't think you can get by with your dad's old red-and-green stand just because he successfully used ...


5

The numbers on each side of your plan are probably measurements in millimeters. That's the closest relation I could find to the handwritten 1098 square feet. 7 541 mm * 13 300 mm = 7,541 m * 13,3 m = 100,295 square meters = 1 079.5 square feet


5

Cove or crown molding that is below (free from) the ceiling by 2-4 Inches will give a subdued look. I would place the strip on the wall just below the aperture of the molding (that slit exposed by lowering the molding). Some installations I've seen use a separate wall trim that angles the light strip up..IE attach a wooden strip behind and below the crown, ...


5

I know you already accepted, but I disagree with @bib on a few points that don't fit in a comment, so I'll provide my own answer. So long as you build a solid frame and connect it well, once installed there is really no chance of existing drywall being "crushed" by the frame. To crush the connecting drywall after installation, you'd need a very serious ...


5

Utterly standard - the subfloor goes on, then the walls go up. Doing it any other way is rather fraught with difficulties to no benefit. You've got the general idea, though it is not really critical on the cross-joist direction (as pictured) and often the parallel to the joist direction is solved by putting blocking between the exposed joist and the hidden ...


5

If all interior walls or, if insulated exterior walls,no need to fill gap with anything. Just get your baseboard moldings up to finish the job


5

Another trick, actually a variation of that of @agentp, is to use wire mesh (also called hardware cloth) instead of a wood strip. Choose one with small holes, 1/8" if you can find it, 1/4" is real common in the building stores. It is particularly useful when the thickness of the material is thin (as in the case of interior hollow-core doors 1/8" luan or ...


4

It really depends how clean the floor is. Particularly where the finish (laquer) has worn off. The purpose of sanding off the finish, as well as a thin layer of wood is to produce a clean, new floor look. However, it seems that you are trying to just make it livable, not brand new. Here's what I'd do: Mop the floor well, with some bleach in the water. ...


4

It should normally be many years, if not decades, before paint starts to peel. Cracking may occur as the house settles, but that is usually due to the structure shifting and not a poor paint job. If the paint was not applied properly (eg, surface not prepared correctly), it may peel earlier, or this may indicate another major problem such as moisture in the ...


4

You're going to have to drill a larger hole for the new handles, which should completely encompass the old hole. Head on down to your local hardware store (or cruse the internet), and look for a door handle installation jig like this Irwin® Door Lock Installation Kit Example only, these jigs are available from many different manufacturers It comes with ...


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