36

I used to have a teacher that said Anyone can do anything given enough time and instruction. That being said every trade has a learning curve to acquire the skills and required tools to accomplish the task. I am a Master Electrician and have been in the construction industry for over 30 years. I am just finishing building a new house and here is what ...


32

The nail heads aren't big enough for the holes. At that time carpenters didn't enjoy the vast array of fasteners and installation tools that we do today, so they may have used what was available at the moment. It did the job, right? ~ or ~ The carpenter had intended to replace them with lag screws and forgot. ~ or ~ There's something sensitive to ...


26

Almost all of the Home Depots that I do business with have short term rental trucks available right in their parking lots for very reasonable rates. Call in and reserve one for a particular time. Drive to the Home Depot in your car and park it in the lot. Go inside and checkout the truck. Then drive it up and load all of your materials and head home with it ...


23

You didn't mention how you're using the ratchet straps, but from your concern about slipping, I think it's possible that you could be using them to better advantage. So I apologize if this is what you're already planning to do, but just on the off chance it isn't... For the MDF, you want the straps going over the edge of the MDF and running straight down to ...


17

It looks like a fan-forced portable furnace, to blow warmed air into the cold building that is being built.


16

Nobody uses a pneumatic nailer for drywall. And in a world where shortcuts are revered, that has to tell you something. You know this already, but screws are the gold standard. They stay put and they pull the drywall as close to framing as possible. Badly set screws can pop, but properly set ones don't. Nails were common in the past, but they were usually ...


13

This is to protect vehicles from damaging gas appliances that lie beyond. This is a code requirement in many jurisdictions, probably including yours, as most builders don't do anything they don't have to.


11

Building parts, building tools, building techniques, and building skills are all based on square walls. With building parts, you have things like bricks with 4 sides, wood sheathing with straight edges, not to mention studs, drywall, and most other building materials with factory edges. With tools, framing squares, levels, speed squares, and corner tools for ...


11

If you have a pulley and no way to anchor it overhead, you could always lift from the top, with the pulley attached to the bucket. Of course, you'll need to have an anchor for the rope somewhere on the floor you're at, but it only has to be at the height you want to lift the bucket to. The resulting load will be half of the bucket that you're lifting. If ...


10

The common practice for future expansion is to install the box and put a blank cover on it. That eliminates the requirement of chopping into the drywall to find the wire. It also eliminates the need to create as-built documents and store them for future reference so you can find the wires later. My recommendation is to install device boxes with ENT (...


8

I live in an area with at least 3 or 4 N-gon (not necessarily octagon) houses. I've been inside one and, as a house geek, asked the owners plenty of questions. Here's what I picked up: They love the house It is FAR larger than it looks from the outside. Like most houses in the neighborhood, this is in the 2000-2800 ft² range. Cabinetry wasn't a problem. ...


8

Because it is easy to remove the nails if required to move the post. The nails mostly hold the post in position until the overall weight of the building bears down a lot of pressure on the post. At that point it is mostly friction between the upper post plate and the beam that holds the post in position.


8

I think you're overthinking this. I carry all kinds of lumber on my roof rack all the time. The 2x4s are no problem at all. Just strap them down tight, one at the front bar and one at the back bar. Sheets goods are harder. Your drawing is completely not to scale and I think you will be surprised how big 4x8 is when you get it up there. However as long as ...


8

you need a "union" connector. It allows both sides to tighten and then tighten union.


8

yes - you can do it! Do not listen to the naysayers, this will be an experience of a lifetime for you! I recommend that all millennials endure the trials and travails of a home build. I trust that you are not saddled with a regular "9 to 5" job, or you have a long row to hoe. Shortlist of requirements: Books, read everything you can about the building ...


7

I agree with others... the amount of custom work required is going to obliterate your budget. Custom-cut flooring, custom-cut drywall, custom wood framing, custom kitchen. Everything will be a hand-done one-off. I wouldn't be surprised if the final cost were double what you'd pay for a square house of comparable footage, and take a lot longer to build. If ...


7

If you had an professional engineer design the whole unit as an assembly it may be possible to have the railings and metal concrete reinforcing members in the steps and risers work as a trussed span structure that was only supported at the bottom step and at the top step. This is definitely not a project for any local neighborhood handyman, general masonry ...


7

If your question were Is an intelligent layman likely to successfully build a habitable house from plans by himself?, I think the answer is 99.5% no. As far as building a "house from plans", yes, but the result is very likely to be a disaster. A modern house has dozens of different technologies, many of which are inscrutable to a layman. Preparing a ...


6

It occurred to me that this project might benefit from a single piece stone cap and eliminate lintel altogether. You could incorporate a bit of slope and weather proof the structure. A stone supply house could fashion it out of limestone. More traditional lintel: This window drawing is pretty analogous to a mailbox opening: You are probably building a ...


6

The MDF might be a problem. When driving at any appreciable speed the sheet will catch air and try to sail up and away. This is compounded by the air that is pushed up and over your hood and windshield, right up into the MDF. I had two sheets of particle board that broke off where the straps were holding them down. It wasn't a clean break :) I would ...


6

It is fine to do what you propose, as long as you are 100% certain that the cables/wires are not terminated at the feed/switch ends. This is very common. This is NOT burying a junction box or splice. There is no code prohibition to leaving a dead wire in the wall for future use. I would however take photos of the area for your own records, and label the ...


6

Change Order is the only term I know of involving an amendment to an accepted contract. The Wikipedia article covers it well: In project management, a change order is a component of the change management process whereby changes in the Scope of Work agreed to by the Owner, Contractor and Architect/Engineer are implemented. A change order is work that ...


6

By the way, trades are doable, even the scary ones. For instance I'm ace with electrical, but mortally afraid of drywall work. I can probably get over that. Electrical has a lot of complexity, but you just have to do the deep learning, really get the groove of it, ask questions, err on the side of code compliance, and -- here's a fantastic way to let you ...


6

Yes that appears to simply be set on top of a spacer which is then set on top of the buried box. You should be able to lift it off, with some effort, and also keep in mind that some adhesive or mortar might have been used to secure it. It looks like you should be able to remove the spacer under the lid and drop the thing down a few inches to make it flush ...


5

There isn't enough information in that sketch to verify calculations (for instance, we have no idea what's on the floor above), but here are some reactions: Removing 60cm of support may be significant, depending on how much load that wall was carrying. If the arch is structural, removing it requires additional support. Your existing building may not be ...


5

Lift the dry materials, run a hose for the water, mix in place, avoid having to lift the weight of the water. The REALLY EASY but rather expensive method - hire a concrete pump truck for the day.


5

I had a project some years back building a 28 foot high chimney. Needless to say there was a need to hoist a lot of buckets of mortar and then all the chimney blocks and flue liners up to the work site. I ended up renting some scaffold bracket assemblies that came with a overhanging cross bar with a large pulley hanging on the end of it. You could try this ...


5

Why not simply construct a series of 8' long workbenches? This will give you more flexibility later on, if you need to deploy them differently (e.g. in an "L" shape instead of end-to-end. HTH.


5

For an 8.5' span I'd say no. The purpose of the jack studs isn't just to hold up the header - it also helps distribute the load more evenly to the foundation. For that wide of a span the IRC calls for 2 jacks(see R502.5 Allowable girder spans).


5

Ed's suggestion is fine. Another option is to assume it will leak and built to allow it to happen as a rain screen wall. A rain screen wall has a waterproof interior, an air gap, then the exterior siding. Any water getting behind the siding can air dry within this gap.


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