37

I used to have a teacher that said Anyone can do anything given enough time and instruction. That being said every trade has a learning curve to acquire the skills and required tools to accomplish the task. I am a Master Electrician and have been in the construction industry for over 30 years. I am just finishing building a new house and here is what ...


24

I hate to tell you this, but your barn is toast. Have it demolished before it kills some curious soul who wanders inside out of morbid fascination.


18

For the love of God, don't do anything from inside, to avoid collapsing on you. I would get a 2x6 for the top bracing and a couple of 2x4's for the bracing. Nail the bracing to the top bracing, away from the structure. Use at least a 20-30 degree angle (eye it if needed) Use 2 people and push it into place without getting close. Once in position, drive some ...


9

yes - you can do it! Do not listen to the naysayers, this will be an experience of a lifetime for you! I recommend that all millennials endure the trials and travails of a home build. I trust that you are not saddled with a regular "9 to 5" job, or you have a long row to hoe. Shortlist of requirements: Books, read everything you can about the building ...


8

If your question were Is an intelligent layman likely to successfully build a habitable house from plans by himself?, I think the answer is 99.5% no. As far as building a "house from plans", yes, but the result is very likely to be a disaster. A modern house has dozens of different technologies, many of which are inscrutable to a layman. Preparing a ...


7

By the way, trades are doable, even the scary ones. For instance I'm ace with electrical, but mortally afraid of drywall work. I can probably get over that. Electrical has a lot of complexity, but you just have to do the deep learning, really get the groove of it, ask questions, err on the side of code compliance, and -- here's a fantastic way to let you ...


7

It's "a property with two buildings on it". You are right that a duplex is typically considered a single building partitioned into two living spaces, often multifamily. I don't know of any widespread terms for setups with a single property with two similarly sized or even the same building built twice, as I believe that situation is rather rare. ...


6

According to Table R602.3(1) of the International residential code (IRC), you have to use two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners to end nail the top or sole plate to a stud. If the studs were toe nailed to the sole plate, then either three 8d (2 1/2" x 0.133") or two 16d (3 1/2" x 0.135") fasteners would be required. International Residential Code 2012 ...


5

You have a complicated question here and the best (and most legally-correct) answer will probably come from talking to your local building inspector. Preferably before a lot of work has already been done... First, the question of which building code is even applicable is not clear to me. The International Residential Code ("IRC") only applies for 1- and 2-...


5

I have twice gone down to mexico to build a basic frame of a house in 3 days. There was about 20 of us working on it. first day was leveling the ground and pouring concrete. Second was building the wall frames and raising them. Third was roofing and putting up the outside stucco walls. The inside was not finished but had 4 different rooms (just wood frames) ...


5

These are metal shims - very very common. You install ibeam and either right after install or after joists are installed you want to level everything out. You will need to shim at least one side. This is really common. Dealing with ground settling, concrete shrinking and so on over a 60' or longer stretch you have two options: Pay a ton of money to ...


5

If the crack is in a part of the roof that has rafters on either side, it will not matter as long as the rafters on the other side are directly opposite of the ones in the picture. Since the picture cuts off what is beyond the crack or even how long the crack is, it is difficult to determine if the overhang is supported by the ridge to any degree. That would ...


5

You have several challenges when adding many thousands of lbs. of weight to a roof system like that (which almost certainly wasn't designed with that use in mind): The ceiling joists aren't up to the task, as you know. The only real fix for this over a 24' span is to tie them to the rafters, which leads us to the next problem... The rafters are barely ...


4

Yes, you can do it. You could do all of it (given time and money), but take good note of the idea of subbing out the hard/specialty things (my personal list would include foundations, hvac, plumbing, electrical**, any siding that isn't wood, drywall***, flooring****, and the things that just take a lot of time/muscle (landscaping comes to mind, roofing ...


4

+----------------------------+ | | | | | | | | +----------------------------+ [*]-------------------------[-]---------------------[*] <-- stake with nail ^-- stake with nail at ^-- stake at roughly set under extended ...


4

Since you are cantilevering off the wall, the verticals must be exemplary. This is a very significant structural side load. I would consider Unistrut, and it must be tied to studs proper, never to drywall itself. If the stays (diagonal cables) came the whole width of the bed, they would carry up to 100% of the occupancy load if the person is rolled out ...


4

I wouldn’t remove the posts. The posts have footings that support the loads from the beam. If you remove the posts and build a wall, you’ll need to install a footing under the new wall. I’d just build a non-structural infill wall under the beam.


4

For your “with ducting”, it should not be an issue at all, since you have met the full requirements with ducting. For your “Without ducting”, in general you have met the condition, as the 300 cf room has an opening to a larger space, which meets the requirement. In your “worst-case” scenario, it would perform just like a normal electric hot water heater ...


4

Sheathing layout is determined by stud layout (and vice versa*), and it's unlikely that a framer lays out studs with an extra ½" in mind. Sheathing usually starts at the end of a wall, or it overlaps one stud width (3½" or 5½") to cap an adjacent wall, but rarely will carpenters lap that extra half inch. There are a couple reasons for this: ...


3

People certainly do this in the UK - and bear in mind that the standard construction method in the UK is not wood-frame, but walls built with bricks and mortar. Of course there is a tradeoff here - UK houses are not built on a continuous concrete slab foundation, the foundations only extend under the actual walls! Usually, a group of like-minded people will ...


3

The very likely outcome will be that the structural engineer will go away to do the necessary calculations, specify the requirement for the underpinning to be carried out by a contractor, and the tree will be converted to firewood (tree preservation order permitting). The underpinning will be carried out and leave the building stronger than it was before. ...


3

I hate physics, but structural engineering is all about physics. The concept of “designing” structural walls, roofs, foundations, etc. is really the intersection of material’s substance and the concept of load transfer. That is to say, to design roofs, walls, etc. and their connections, you must understand materials and how they move under stress. For ...


3

OK, I am assuming you are running 15A or 20A circuits for the bathroom and it can be run in 1/2" conduit. First you are right to abandon the idea to bend EMT through the soffit and into the attic. Unless you get really lucky the geometry just doesn't work out. Instead you need to either transition from EMT to LFMC, Liquid Flexible Metallic Conduit (...


3

Many designs have legs at both exterior corners, but your design uses stays, the stays should reach more than half way across the platform, else they and the hinge will be seeing magnified loads. the top end of the stay should be as high as possible on the frame. perhaps consider folding stays instead of telescopic. The ladder should rest on the floor when ...


3

Corrugatesd (or other profile) "iron" (ie. sheet steel) skin, over 2x4 frame cross-braced with metal strap. You want one or two courses of blocking to give an attachment point for the sheets. The floor (and thus roof) seems small enough that you can eschew rafters and build a skillion roof with the iron laid directly on purlins which rest on the ...


3

Most places, not just Sweden, you need a building permit to build a house/building or any thing above a certain size(a tiny shed usually does not need one). Most places also require a building permit to change/add on(decks, heating, plumbing) to a house. The clearing permit sounds like just to clear/cut down trees to prepare land, no building required. ...


2

For safety sake it should be demolished to the foundation and all the stones and any salvageable beams should be retained. Then when you build it back from ground up it will be a better structure. Hopefully the foundation is good. If not pour and tie in a slab foundation when you rebuild.


2

Just found this. The SDWS Framing screw is designed and load-rated for replacing 16d, 10d and 8d nails in framing applications. The SDWS Framing screw is 0.160" in diameter and superior to nails in holding power and pull-out resistance. It is code listed under IAPMO UES ER-192 and meets 2012 and 2015 IRC® and IBC® code requirements for several common wood ...


2

There is absolutely no concern with a small amount of space between a new addition and the garage from the ground level. In fact who is helping design this is smart for not attaching new structure to old, in that if garage foundation is poor you don't want an issue with new addition because of this and also vice versa. A new addition's foundation may ...


2

no builder in his right mind would have installed hardwood on a wavy floor. it sounds more to me like their was a flood which has damaged the hardwood. its swelling, subsequent twisting and then drying has caused the randomly warped floor, but it could also be too high of an ambient humidity, which can be a sign of a bad vapour barrier system and all the ...


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