37

No. Section 314.29 of the National Electrical Code (adopted in some form in most localities in the US) requires that all outlet boxes be accessible without removing any part of the building or structure. That includes wallboard. You could build a recessed section in the wall that has an easily removed front panel. You could install an outlet in that ...


30

Is it supposed to be like that? There needs to be air circulation in unheated space to prevent condensation causing rot. It's freezing up there That is good. It means your loft insulation is working. I'm more concerned about animals entering the house. I found fixing wire-mesh externally to any small gaps at the top of the walls keeps unwelcome ...


22

I realize this is an old question, however I just wanted to mention something... Tester101 indicated not to drill too many holes within the joist, as it could weaken it and cause structural damage. I thought I should clarify something... The principal force that is applied to a floor joist is moment. With that, you get tensile along the bottom edge, and ...


18

You can use a recessed outlet to hide the wires. These were originally created so wall mounted electrical clocks can be mounted flush. They are now pretty commonly used for home theater setups where the TV is mounted to the wall, so there aren't any visible wires. Something like this could work for your tablet setup. You would just have to make sure that ...


17

According to this document (PDF), accidental notches in the top flange may not need to be repaired if they meet specific criteria. To determine if a repair is required, we'd need a bit more information, including: The distance from the center of the notch to the end of the beam. The depth of the notch. The specific beam used, including beam height. If a ...


15

Point your home builder to page 9 of Weyerhauser's I-joist document here. See the bottom right of the page where it says "DO NOT cut or notch flange" It is typical of all I-joist manufacturers' installation documents. As Iggy pointed out, the I-Joist in question needs to be reinforced similar to a cantilever reinforcement. To fix this, the electrical ...


14

Only if you're a "professional" plumber. Cut twice as much & then measure, hey lookie there just like they did in your place. Seriously no, you're completely right the I's of I-joists are NEVER to be touched nor any holes within 3" of the top or bottom edges. "Responsible" plumbers & builders re-spec a toilet with a deeper stand-off or just pull it ...


12

In the cases where I've run I to something like this, the hotel originally had open walkways around the rooms -- allowing more light in, and probably cheaper to build -- which were later closed off with an outside wall to provide a sheltered approach to the rooms and to reduce energy needed to heat or cool the rooms. The windows were left in place because ...


11

Their insurance may lean that way. Rates are probably lower if they are not selling to end-users. They may also not have to deal with sales tax, if they are not selling to end-users. As for the (or more) economic incentive many take for granted: the cost of customer service. The below consumes valuable man-hours and to staff this could double payroll: They ...


11

I recommend combining a recessed outlet box, outlet with usb charging, and right angle usb cable.


10

This is due to a sales restriction by the EPA. The logic behind the ban is to minimize the risk of releasing ozone depleting refrigerant into the atmosphere. If you plan to work on HVAC systems fairly often (e.g. if you manage a lot of properties), then you could look into getting yourself certified (it may be a simple as taking some night classes at a local ...


10

As pointed out by many others at this point, direct answer to your question is No: you are not allowed to install an outlet inside a wall. All outlets and junctions must be accessible without having to modify building structure or components. I would skip the high voltage entirely here and use Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) on Cat5e/6 cables to bring power to ...


7

That area is supposed to be open for venting the roof. However it should be covered with a material made of aluminum or vinyl with a type of screen to allow air to enter but keep small animals and rodents out. To get an idea of what I am talking about GOOGLE "soffit and fascia",and you will see typical installations. This roof area should be cold unless you ...


6

IRC - 2006 Requires bath fans only if no operable window. Bathroom ventilation can operate intermittently at a minimum of 50 cfm or continuously at a minimum of 20 cfm, the same as 62 Bath fans must meet the design airflow either through on airflow either through on site testing or using their certified rated flow at 0.25” water column. Bath fans must be ...


6

Can you do it, sure. Should you do it, no way. If you ever want to sell your house, it probably won't pass inspection if the inspector finds it like that If your house ever catches fire due to that wiring your homeowners insurance will not cover it.


6

This varies greatly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. It also depends on what kind of work and how much. In many locations, minor electrical work, in-kind plumbing replacement, interior construction that does not change the overall footprint or the number or types of bedrooms, bathrooms, etc, (such as the building of a closet in an existing room) need no ...


6

First of all, building codes covering private residences are typically not the same as larger commercial buildings. In the USA those are often the IRC and IBC, respectively (although each state has their own versions and amendments). But to the issue you asked about: were the windows into the hallway operable? Hotel windows are usually inoperable and are ...


5

Laws and rules vary widely across the country. Most towns or counties have the right to inspect the interiors of dwellings for the purpose of tax assessment, health and safety conditions. Construction inspections fall into all these categories. Insurance companies may require inspections to assess their risk of loss. The purpose of most govt inspections is ...


5

Alcove tubs are designed with flanges, or lips, on the 2 short ends plus one of the long ends. The purpose of these flanges is to create an edge that the tile and backer board should cover, ensuring that water drips on the wall land on the tub. Your design won't suit an alcove tub. However, you can install a 'stand-alone' tub and use a tile gasket seal ...


5

No, this is not a code requirement for laundry rooms in dwelling units (at least in the 2012 IBC). In fact, most dryers are essentially acting as exhaust fans when they run because they take air from the room and exhaust it outside.


5

As alluded to above, the obvious answer is to get a large clock receptacle (just google it), e.g., http://www.amazon.com/Arlington-DVFR2W-1-Recessed-Electrical-Paintable/dp/B001XQ4JFC -- with this one you can go to town, mount whatever you want in it. And you'll need a 90 degree micro USB adapter to make the charging cable go away. Ebay has stuff like that....


5

Ceiling height: 8 feet (nominal; 92-5/8" stud length plus 4-1/2" of plates), 9 and 10 feet less common (108" and 120" studs); vaulted ceiling peaks as room size and slope dictate Wall thickness: interior, 3-1/2" (nominal 2x4) plus half-inch drywall on both sides; exterior, 5-1/2" (nominal 2x6) plus half-inch drywall inside, half inch sheathing outside, and ...


5

These are metal shims - very very common. You install ibeam and either right after install or after joists are installed you want to level everything out. You will need to shim at least one side. This is really common. Dealing with ground settling, concrete shrinking and so on over a 60' or longer stretch you have two options: Pay a ton of money to ...


4

I don't think this is entirely true anymore. Most HVAC suppliers in my area allow "consumers" to buy from them. There is usually a song and dance to be done. For instance anyone can sign up on several large retailers that sell lots of stuff to HVAC techs, electricians, plumbers and so on. We know the big names. What you do is register yourself as a ...


4

There are probably various limitations per region and per type of code. It also depends on what we mean by 'conventional' framing. For stick framing (platform) it appears the limit is 5 stories primarily due to fire code: Source


4

Seeing as you're in the UK (lots of well-enforced building regulations) and you're wanting to remove at least one load-bearing wall (the old external wall), you absolutely need to bring in the pros and start dealing with all the hassles of permitted renovation. I'm not sure if you'll be allowed to do any of the work yourself, but if you are, it will ...


4

No, that is totally untrue. There are plenty of rules for bathrooms, but what you are describing would make all "master bathrooms" that are only accessible from the master bedroom illegal, and that is definitely NOT the case. And it is perfectly legal to have two "master bedrooms" in a house, in fact it is becoming a desirable feature on smaller houses ...


3

It's simple. I'm an HVAC technician, and I don't want you doing your own work. Every job you do yourself takes money out of my pocket. I'm not going to buy supplies from a guy who sells to the public, so most suppliers aren't going to bite the hand that feeds them. The supplier is going to make much more money from me than from you, so guess who they're ...


3

We would have to talk to your building department to answer that question. For something like this there may be a serious safety issue. If a small child got hurt or someone got knocked over you would be liable if you didn't fix it and knew about it... It is customary in the US to get the replacement cost of something that isn't code built into the price ...


3

In Massachusetts, you cannot convert conservation land to commercial use unless you pay commercial taxes on it for FIVE years first. So, for example, let's say it is 50 acres of land that would be worth $15 million on the open market, but its owner is willing to sell it to you for $1.5 million because it is conservation land. You want to build a house on ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible