18

I've installed several systems in new construction projects up to about 6,000 s.f., one of which was a log home. (That was interesting.) No, you don't necessarily get better performance. It's all about convenience and not having to deal with dusty bags or canisters except maybe once a year. A really good standalone unit will at least equal a central vac ...


17

This is fine. It's a wooden open web truss system. The weight is transferred to the column at the one top point. The lower bar and diagonal bracing are to prevent the top bar from sagging over a wide span. The lower bar extends all the way to the wall so there is something for the ceiling drywall to screw into, but isn't supposed to rest on the column....


16

Well this is a pretty big deal because we don't know the cause. First let's go over common reasons we get cracks on new floors. Soil wasn't properly compacted. Soil should be compacted with a rock bed on top. Bad mixing at site. Especially in the summer contractors pump too much water in the mix. The water makes the concrete weaker and it does crack ...


12

Like anything else, can be done well or poorly. Having seen some done poorly, those are a waste of money. Short sharp turns, improperly arranged tees make keeping the system free of clogs a pain, when the system is clogged it does not vacuum very well. Then people resort back to portable vacuum cleaners. Less dust in the house: well, that depends on where ...


11

The answer depends on what you are willing to accept for a finished result. Removing the quarter-round allows the edger to reach underneath what is visible when the quarter-round is re-installed. Even the most fastidious edging is going to be visible to close inspection if the trim isn't removed. The extent to which it is obvious depends largely on the ...


10

Although David Moore is somewhat correct, there are a lot of varied explanations to your question depending on where you live, the market etc. In large markets, there are large corporate home builders that have multiple crews covering all trades and do a turn key package. Many do custom homes from your plans. Many however will only build your home on land ...


8

Short answer, you definitely want the patch panel, especially if you ran shielded cable. (If you did not run shielded cable, you probably don't want a shielded patch panel.) Male terminations are less reliable than punchdown connections. They tend to create marginal / intermittent failures in many cases, which can be particularly hard to track down. To ...


7

Couple of benefits of patch panels. They make the install neater. You could have the entire bundle of cables going to each room just terminated and hanging lose until it is needed. Or you can terminate them into a panel where they are tucked away. Also labeling the bundle of cables is problematic. Labels fall off and then you spend 10 minutes trying to ...


6

Yes, you're being paranoid. If it was installed correctly, there really isn't much of anything that will go wrong with it from sitting - most septic problems are from using the system and not maintaining it, leading to material that should have been pumped out getting into the drain field and clogging it. If it's not used, that won't happen. The materials ...


6

Congratulations on becoming a home owner. You will soon learn to use lots of tools if you plan to do any DIY projects around the house. Most locksets only require a #2 Phillips screwdriver. You should not need any special or expensive tools. Just read the directions and follow them. Changing locks is very simple, usually just two screws that hold the inner ...


6

It is fine to do what you propose, as long as you are 100% certain that the cables/wires are not terminated at the feed/switch ends. This is very common. This is NOT burying a junction box or splice. There is no code prohibition to leaving a dead wire in the wall for future use. I would however take photos of the area for your own records, and label the ...


5

You are going to get lots of opinions on this but in general I would say people with experience building homes - maybe 30% (I think I am being overly optimistic) could do a custom right with no major problems. General contractors - ha. You are looking at 5% if that. You need someone with experience with custom homes. You need an architect to OK it. Not ...


5

We had this same problem. The smell was only coming from our kitchen sink, and only for a few seconds after the water was turned on. No other faucet in the house had smelly water, so I was quite certain it wasn’t from water heater issues. We tried draining some water from the water heater just in case, but no sediment came out and no smell. Since the smell ...


5

It’s a structural tie for lateral forces. Those are shear walls and when you cut a window into it, you need to add a tie to “transfer” the load through the wall.


5

Put it in. Way better for noise unless you are vacuuming close to the motor unit. Typically better built. Standalone vacuums tend to fall apart easier and not last as long, I've had to replace the motor on the central vac after 10 years of use. If you have a decent install you can get smaller reach hoses. Also there is now a system where the hose can ...


5

The information I have seen is that the ADA recommendations for grab bars in bath and shower are placement 33" to 36" above the floor of the shower or tub. So the expected height of the shower floor or tub must be added when placing blocking during framing. Be sure the blocking is in the plane of the studs so it does not interfere with drywall placement. ...


5

No, there isn't unless ADA is involved. You should have a copy of your drawings that you can mark up with backing, electrical preferences, and any other concerns. Its entirely up to you, so you should schedule a walk-through specific to that, and another specific to electrical (fixture and device locations). Make estimations at height based on your ...


4

Congrats on your pending venture, a new home! I am a certified Home Inspector and have a few ideas for you. Actually, there are several items that a good home inspector is going to look at that are not on your list. Keep in mind that an inspector is going to be able to render an opinion on the condition of the systems and structure of the house. Other ...


4

I'm guessing the circuits are sharing a neutral, and so are considered a multiwire branch circuit. Branch Circuit, Multiwire. A branch circuit that consists of two or more ungrounded conductors that have a voltage between them, and a grounded conductor that has equal voltage between it and each ungrounded conductor of the circuit and that is ...


4

As best one can see from that resolution those are twisted pair cables. The blue is probably a Cat5e or Cat6, for ethernet, and the yellow is probably Cat3/VG for phone. If you look closely you should see the rating on the jacket. If your area has or is scheduled to receive fiber-optic com utilities then some vendors (like FIOS) put the fiber terminal ...


4

My own opinion on the pros and cons of a patch panel: Pros: Cleaner look Easier to locate a specific room's connection Easier to deal with non-connected rooms (think of a 5 port switch in a 10 room home with only needing to connect 3 of those rooms) Cons: Extra piece of equipment to install and clutter a tight networking space Extra possible failure ...


4

Personally, I find little use or benefit to a patch panel in a home install. If using the correct connectors (ones rated for solid wires, or more typically for both solid and stranded wires, rather than the ones rated only for stranded wires) plug connections are quick and easy, and there's two fewer places to fail (the patch panel jack and the patch panel ...


4

Get a copy of the local electric codes and/or contact a licensed professional in your area. The power company should also have the necessary information for what they require for a proper connection. This is not something you should DIY lightly. This is also something where the work requires inspection from the local authorities. The power company will (...


4

I'd paint the ceiling, unless it's like new it will look out of place with fresh walls and floors. Installing some down lights I'd do this first because of gravity - dirt falls down - you don't want that on brand new carpets, even the walls might get dirty so do it before the paint. No big deal painting around recessed lighting. Painting ...


4

I am pretty confident this would not be something easy (or even feasible) to get installed after the home is built. The pipes usually go in the wall or loft space which would make it difficult to install at a later date. Unless you are happy with large diameter plastic pipes fixed to your walls. My partner is quite small and she did struggle with all the ...


3

The usual disclaimer: I'm not an engineer, lawyer, contractor, or septic installer... this advice is worth what you paid for it :) As Ecnerwal says, I'd guess the system itself should be fine. If you have doubts, septic pumping companies often offer a pump out (necessary for inspection) and inspection for a cost perhaps in the $300 to $400 range (highly ...


3

From Google: or·ange·ry /ˈôrənjrē/ Noun A greenhouse where orange trees are grown. Synonyms hothouse So, structurally speaking, there is no difference between the terms. The difference is merely based on what you put inside of it (whether or not you put orange trees in it). (If you grow lemon trees, is it a Lemony?)


3

Cleaning your walls won't help; you're only taking away the crud your termites output. Filling in the holes won't make a difference to the original problem of termites eating away at your structure. This might make things look good, but stuff is rotting away deep inside, and no amount of lipstick can fix that. Please call an exterminator. That's certainly ...


3

First thing to confirm would be which direction the switches are being fed from. There are 2 ways that you can do this - feed from the switch: Or feed from the fixture: When feeding from a fixture, you'll notice that one of the white wires is actually being used as a black wire. It is common practice for this to be "coded black", usually with a single ...


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