43

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


33

It looks like a cosmetic DIY patch-job was already attempted before. The current situation is exactly how you can expect your attempt to turn out. This is a structural issue and I would hire a professional. Odds are very high that an entire section of wall will need to be removed and a new wall made of block will be installed. Prepare yourself and your ...


27

This is known as "plastic settlement cracking", a type of shrinkage crack. It's the result of the rebar being too close to the surface. As water settles out of the concrete, it tends to shrink downward. If the rebar is close to the surface the concrete tends to pull around it and gaps appear. Plastic settlement cracks can form in young concrete, ...


24

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


17

Yes, you can do that. Provide plenty of rebar length past the joint. The vast majority of commercial projects are poured in sections, and virtually everything more than 60-70 years old was poured in sections.


14

I agree with Ecnerwal, yes you can do that. I also agree to extend the rebar past the pour (drill holes in the form boards and extend the rebar out the holes). Code (and CSI) require 30 bar diameters. So, if you’re using #4 bar (1/2” diameter), then you need to extend it a minimum of 15”. Edit: CSI = CRSI


13

Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


12

The information is incorrect, the temperature at which concrete becomes unsafe for re-use is significantly lower, 570 degrees F actually. The 'telltale" sign is if concrete that was not charred from nearby combustibles turns a pinkish hue. That color change is due to chemical changes in the iron-containing compounds in the aggregates used in making concrete ...


12

You've really got a two-step question here Would a lack of gutters and grading explain the water? The simple answer is yes. That's the source here. Even without gutters and proper grading, should the foundation walls still be water proof if they were constructed correctly? It's that second question that will get you. Your basement walls comprise an access ...


12

Yes, the national electric code allows wiring in structures like your shed. If you plan on using UF wire for the run buried 24” deep you need to bring the wire up in conduit so the wire is protected. If you run conduit, the conduit only has to be buried 18” for PVC. If you run rigid or intermediate metal it can be buried 6”. Burial depths are listed in the ...


12

Potentially there are three issues. The cracks could be caused by any single issue or any mix of the issues. Not enough clear cover over the rebar mat. The concrete mix contained too much water (high slump), which usually is the result of adding water during concrete placement to make it more workable (self- floatable). High slump concrete mix is likely to ...


11

It is advisable to use a slip joint [expansion coupling] on the conduit stub up, otherwise nothing out of the ordinary. Around here, that's not out of the ordinary even with a poured foundation. Assuming PVC conduit, 18" cover to the top of the conduit, minimum. Warning tape above. Stub-ups (what sticks out of the ground) need to be schedule 80, and it'...


10

For concrete foundations no, asbestos is not an issue. However, the earth in your location may contain asbestos. In Northern California my brother is having a pool installed and they had to monitor for asbestos while digging. The dust masks are used for cutting concrete or just the dust. The concrete and rock dust is not good to breathe so we usually wear ...


10

Sounds like a hack-job approach to me. That wall could be built from concrete blocks (aka CMUs or concrete masonry units), with bond-block rows and reinforcing steel, and grouted full, making it effectively solid, without abandoning forms in place - or rather, the forms would be the block wall. Of course, poured concrete contractors and masons are not ...


10

The first step of repairing a deteriorated wall is to knock loose and remove the bad materials to the solid base. However, in your case, I suspect there is nothing solid that remains, as the cracks are likely to have penetrated through the thickness of the wall, the removal, and refilling of the defects will require significant efforts, so a professional is ...


9

If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder gives you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction ...


8

I've used a sawzall type reciprocating saw with the 14" long demolition style blades for similar type wood removal in the ground. Be prepared to replace the blade a few times as cutting into dirt can mess up the teeth after a while. With the saw like this you should be able to cut completely through the old timber without having to do any chiseling in ...


8

Ultimately, I decided to save it. I used stacks of cribbing with large beams to jack the building up off of the failing foundation walls. Similar to this (much larger) example: Once I had it up on the crib stacks, I was able to remove the jacking beams, pour concrete footers/piers, and set 6x6 posts. The building now rests on those posts and sits firmly. ...


8

None of the holes are an issue. There is some slight compression with the one joist - in your top picture. But it doesn't look to be an issue and it is certainly not caused by that small hole. If you did replace this joist (given the compression) you could introduce flooring issues above. The second picture... Looks like they drilled it for PVC then ...


7

I'd have no concerns about doing what you describe. I've seen it done many times here in frigid Minnesota. Build your walls (using treated lumber and suitable nails where it contacts the slab), insulate the walls and ceiling, and line the entire thing with 4 mil poly sheeting. Yes, you'll lose a bit of heat through the floor, but since your heat source is ...


6

If you want to install it yourself, great. But I suggest you start by having an engineer look at the application and calculate your requirements. Could be well worth the investment.


6

This may be a problem or non-problem depending on the foundation construction. You'll be much better off consulting an expert who knows how foundations are built in your area and how to diagnose them. One option is that the foundation is designed with separate large thick concrete pads that bear the load and then the space between them is filled with ...


6

No this is not okay - especially for a new house. If the builder is saying it is okay, run away from this house because you have no idea what else they have screwed up. You can't put a post on a slab if it is structural (i.e. not decorative). A concrete slab is not designed (and shouldn't be) to handle structural loads like this. The concrete looks fine. ...


6

FWIW, that's technically called a "raised patio" rather than a deck. At 40' long, your challenge will be to prevent cracking...so I'd count on putting in expansion joints. If you want to ensure a solid base, you need to use crushed rock and add it layer-by-layer mechanically compacting each layer before adding the next. That's going to be some work to get ...


6

You have several issues: 1) Hold your building up, 2) keep your building stable (lateral stability) 3) freeze/thaw, 1) I would be careful to calculate the number of piers required to support such a heavy load as a log cabin. The piers have a small bearing area (perhaps as small as 12”x12”) and your load is tremendous. The benefit of a continuous footing ...


6

mortar is not really structural, I would go with steel, perhaps half-inch plate and some washers


6

Check with a termite control company and/or the state agency that studies termite control. Also check with your homeowner's insurance company. Having all that buried wood would invite termites.


6

It is possible to remove those forms. We did plenty of that when I worked for my dad. Usually contractors want to keep and re-use the form panels because they are expensive. There are only two real drawbacks to leaving the panels on the foundation: You will not be able to coat the exterior of the foundation wall with any waterproofing. Usually something ...


6

Step 1: Properly size the support lumber What we see there looks like more than just swelling to me. It seems like someone jammed a full-thickness two-by in there out of haste. Swelling was just the final straw that caused rubbing. You'll need to remove it. Use a reciprocating saw (Sawzall) to cut any fasteners running through it, then pry it out. Then flex ...


5

I realize that you don't want to proceed with the project but I thought I'd answer anyway in case someone else is curious. I am a licensed contractor and my company specializes in basement remodeling; we have done several window expansions or additions in concrete foundations. A few things: You definitely need a permit for this project (though you don't ...


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