Hot answers tagged

47

Welcome to the joys of working with a natural product! Before I address your construction techniques, I've got to say that is a quite handsome looking door you've made. Well done! Wood moves. It expands and contracts as temperature and humidity change. It's a "feature" of wood that you cannot and will not be able to change. It's so critical, common and ...


16

In addition to the accepted answer, it would help to add some weather protection. A small rain shield or canopy will help divert weather from the upper part of the door. Essentially a small verandah to divert both rain and sun from the door without impeding access, and gives you shelter when opening the door in the weather. Awning, canopy, door shelter, ...


12

Generically I'd knee-jerk to conduit and 30A 240V service with a sub-panel, but if your needs are going to be adequately met by 20A 120V power and the loading is sufficiently low that the voltage drop from 200 ft of 12Ga wire won't be a huge issue, yes, you can do that. Given the relative expense of digging a ditch once, and never having to dig it again if ...


12

Yes, the national electric code allows wiring in structures like your shed. If you plan on using UF wire for the run buried 24” deep you need to bring the wire up in conduit so the wire is protected. If you run conduit, the conduit only has to be buried 18” for PVC. If you run rigid or intermediate metal it can be buried 6”. Burial depths are listed in the ...


11

It is advisable to use a slip joint [expansion coupling] on the conduit stub up, otherwise nothing out of the ordinary. Around here, that's not out of the ordinary even with a poured foundation. Assuming PVC conduit, 18" cover to the top of the conduit, minimum. Warning tape above. Stub-ups (what sticks out of the ground) need to be schedule 80, and it'...


10

In the USA you get to play fast and loose with this. If you simply extend with 12 AWG, you'll have 0.6% voltage drop per amp that you draw... so a 1/4 amp battery charger won't give any drop at all, but a 14 amp lawnmower will give you about 8% drop - not good. For permanently installed wiring, I like to keep voltage drop under about 5-6%. So you're pretty ...


10

Both answers are great, but I wanted to note that you really should be adding a water-proofing solution to the door on a regular basis. As Criggie noted, covering the door would naturally limit how much water and it's exposed to, but the door will still get some water on it. Water is your enemy in wood because wood absorbs it like a sponge (go to a lumber ...


10

You can't run 2 separate circuits of the same type to an outbuilding. If they are 120V circuits you could run the two as a multi-wire branch circuit, which counts as 1 circuit. You would need 10/3 cable for that. Alternately, you could run a 10/3 or larger cable and feed that to a subpanel. That may be more of a production than you want to get into, ...


8

Edit to answer new question: It appears that currently you'd measure the height from "the highest part of the adjoining land.", which would mean that you'd measure from the up side of the slope. Source. So your building; as planned, is in compliance. ‘Height’ - references to height (for example, the heights of the eaves on a house extension) is the ...


8

With rigid or intermediate metal conduit ($$) you can follow code without going very deep - 6" under dirt, 4" under a concrete cover of at least 4" thickness extending at least 6" to either side. Unless you want a concrete path through your garden along the route of the conduit, that's not likely what you want. Rigid and intermediate metal are tough enough ...


7

A ridge board isn't a "beam", per se. It's often just a nice way to bring the rafters together. A proper beam would have a supporting post at each end. You don't need a ridge beam, but you do need a way to keep the walls from spreading. This can be accomplished with "collar ties", boards spanning the shed at ceiling height, or with large gussets further up ...


7

Michael Karas is correct in that a half-height block foundation wall is common, but that doesn't really address your concern about water intrusion. His suggestion to seal the block does, and that wouldn't require the blocks in the first place. I would build your walls with bottom plates of treated lumber one nominal size wider than the walls themselves, ...


7

Just drop a conduit in there instead, you'll thank yourself later Instead of rushing to buy wire and getting the wrong thing, then having to dig it up later, why don't you get yourself some fat PVC conduit (such as 1.5" or 2") and lay that in the trench instead, with prefabricated sweeps and expansion fittings at each end? That way, you can pull ...


6

The number of circuits isn't really the issue. You could run as many as the panel will allow, number of breaker positions. The issue is amps to the panel. You've got 40 amps to use and as long as you don't exceed that for any length of time (you'd trip your 40 amp breaker)' you'll be fine. I'd say three would be fine Think of your house panel; you've got a ...


6

One circuit too far for your idea You are only allowed to effectively run two circuits (one multiwire branch circuit, really) to an outbuilding, given single phase power, or else you'll fall afoul of NEC 225.30 (quote snipped as the rest of it doesn't apply to you): 225.30 Number of Supplies. A building or other structure that is served by a branch circuit ...


5

As with any advice you get here, keep in mind that you must stay within the bounds of IRC building codes adopted by your local municipality. Obtain a building permit and a local inspector will give you guidelines on minimum requirements for posts, beam spans, joist spans, etc... Your concrete piers must be a set depth to go below the frost line in your area....


5

A block wall that is actually part of the original outside wall of the main structure is most certainly a load bearing wall or part of the foundation. It is possible to open a six foot section, but care must be taken to install a properly sized supported header or if block is still going to be above the opening, a steel lentil. You will need some temp ...


5

Firewood needs to dry out. It won't dry out in a sealed shed nearly as fast and completely as it would in an open-air setup. Worry about moisture in the air 'getting back in' to the wood isn't really much of a concern. It's not atmospheric moisture but the moisture that's in the wood initially that's the concern. If you completely season your wood ...


5

A locksmith can order (if necessary) and set up padlocks or locking hasps that respond to your house key, unless the house lock is using a particularly uncommon key blank. They may be a bit larger than the ones designed to be sold in bulk, and they will probably be a bit more expensive, but the price shouldn't be unreasonable.


5

Yes, you can run a single branch circuit to a structure Considering you only need a single branch circuit there, you can run a single branch circuit out to your shed with say 10AWG for hot/neutral/ground, or hot/hot/neutral/ground if you want to run a multi-wire branch circuit. The exception to 250.32(A) means you won't need a ground rod at the shed as the ...


5

Use a ratchet strap or a come-along to pull the corners together on the diagonal that measures longer than the other, then, before removing this, secure a sheet or two of plywood down to the floor joists. You can use some big eye bolts through the rim joists to give your ratcheting device something to hook into at either end. You shouldn’t need to worry ...


5

As with any structure you need to define the loads on it (wind, snow, furniture, people etc) and from there define the structure or framing capable of supporting those loads. There may well be local codes or regulations that need to be respected as well. Since this does look like a neat design, why not check out a local structural engineer or architect to ...


5

+1 option #4, plastic standoffs. "Any thoughts on the most robust way to anchor the posts?" You said you are renting and can not anchor. Take some five gallon buckets and mix up some cement, fill the buckets with the cement and put an eye bolt in so it stick out of the top. Put a nut and washer on the threaded part of the eye bolt that will be in ...


5

In Florida, I have seen many sheds like the one in your picture further supported with cable or strap tie downs. Heavy galvanized eye bolts embedded in each side of the concrete slab. Then straps or cables attached to one eye bolt, up and over the roof and down to an eye bolt on the opposite side. Hope this helps, and hope you never need it. You can get ...


5

OK it's not made of galvanized steel, it's sheathed in galvanized steel. That sheathing is paper-thin and provides no structural value whatsoever. Seriously, ask your engineer how it would affect snow loads if you removed the sheathing and made it a carport. The engineer will say "Not at all, side sheathing provides no strength". It's a liability for wind ...


5

Scrimping now will hit you in the pocketbook far harder later on Your problem is that you're so focused on pinching pennies right now that you don't realize just how much undoing and redoing your work later when you inevitably run out of room (either amps or spaces) will cost you. Most of the cost in running power to an outbuilding is in trenching, so it's ...


5

No you can't run two feeders from the same panel, the NEC only allows one feeder of a type to a building. If everything in the building is on a single circuit there is an exception that allows you to not install ground rods, but if you install a panel with just two branch circuits you need to install ground rods (or other qualified grounding electrode). ...


5

If you're running PVC anyway...there's no need to wrestle that UF alligator down the pipe! Since you're planning to run PVC conduit in any case, you shouldn't bother trying to wrestle that 12/2 UF alligator down it. Instead, what you want to run inside the conduit are 3 individual 12AWG THHN/THWN wires (hot, neutral, ground) of the appropriate colors. This ...


5

To add to JACK's answer, keep in mind... A 120/240V subpanel of 40A has two separate 120V "legs". Each leg is capable of 120V@40A. As you can see, without even having to think about it, we know we can supply four 20A 120V circuits. That was easy LOL. And if you specifically know you will be running certain combinations of tools at the same time, ...


4

Easy water does not lower hardness. It is some wires you wrap around the pipes that cost $1500 and "magnetize" the limestone so it "will not stick to you pipes and fixtures as much". Look it up under scams, fraud etc...


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