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13

Take a look at your local Lowe's, Home Depot or even Amazon online book store. They have several books with lots of different designs. You can look them over and just buy the book that suits your needs. They will have diagrams and material lists. Also these books are fairly cheap. Good luck.


11

This should be a good starter project, here are a few tips I've picked up over the years: Even pressure treated wood will deteriorate over time if it's exposed or in direct contact with the ground/moisture. Do what you can to protect it from the elements and get it raised off of the soil. Use a moisture barrier between wood and concrete. Take care to ...


8

This website has quite a few links for free plans. They're a mix of slab plans and elevated floor plans. You'll have to click through several levels down, but here are some direct links to some of the nicer ones: Basic 6'x8' shed plan with cinder block base. (Expandable up to 8'x12'). Larger 8'x12' shed plan with double doors. This site is also listed ...


8

With rigid or intermediate metal conduit ($$) you can follow code without going very deep - 6" under dirt, 4" under a concrete cover of at least 4" thickness extending at least 6" to either side. Unless you want a concrete path through your garden along the route of the conduit, that's not likely what you want. Rigid and intermediate metal are tough enough ...


7

Edit to answer new question: It appears that currently you'd measure the height from "the highest part of the adjoining land.", which would mean that you'd measure from the up side of the slope. Source. So your building; as planned, is in compliance. ‘Height’ - references to height (for example, the heights of the eaves on a house extension) is the ...


7

Michael Karas is correct in that a half-height block foundation wall is common, but that doesn't really address your concern about water intrusion. His suggestion to seal the block does, and that wouldn't require the blocks in the first place. I would build your walls with bottom plates of treated lumber one nominal size wider than the walls themselves, ...


6

A ridge board isn't a "beam", per se. It's often just a nice way to bring the rafters together. A proper beam would have a supporting post at each end. You don't need a ridge beam, but you do need a way to keep the walls from spreading. This can be accomplished with "collar ties", boards spanning the shed at ceiling height, or with large gussets further up ...


5

I would use some neoprene washers between the exterior bolt head and metal wall. Also put some silicon sealant in the hole/bolt. This will keep water out and stop bolt head from scratching the powder coating and causing rust. Should work fine.


5

As with any advice you get here, keep in mind that you must stay within the bounds of IRC building codes adopted by your local municipality. Obtain a building permit and a local inspector will give you guidelines on minimum requirements for posts, beam spans, joist spans, etc... Your concrete piers must be a set depth to go below the frost line in your ...


5

A block wall that is actually part of the original outside wall of the main structure is most certainly a load bearing wall or part of the foundation. It is possible to open a six foot section, but care must be taken to install a properly sized supported header or if block is still going to be above the opening, a steel lentil. You will need some temp ...


5

Firewood needs to dry out. It won't dry out in a sealed shed nearly as fast and completely as it would in an open-air setup. Worry about moisture in the air 'getting back in' to the wood isn't really much of a concern. It's not atmospheric moisture but the moisture that's in the wood initially that's the concern. If you completely season your wood ...


5

A locksmith can order (if necessary) and set up padlocks or locking hasps that respond to your house key, unless the house lock is using a particularly uncommon key blank. They may be a bit larger than the ones designed to be sold in bulk, and they will probably be a bit more expensive, but the price shouldn't be unreasonable.


5

Yes, you can run a single branch circuit to a structure Considering you only need a single branch circuit there, you can run a single branch circuit out to your shed with say 10AWG for hot/neutral/ground, or hot/hot/neutral/ground if you want to run a multi-wire branch circuit. The exception to 250.32(A) means you won't need a ground rod at the shed as the ...


5

Use a ratchet strap or a come-along to pull the corners together on the diagonal that measures longer than the other, then, before removing this, secure a sheet or two of plywood down to the floor joists. You can use some big eye bolts through the rim joists to give your ratcheting device something to hook into at either end. You shouldn’t need to worry ...


4

Safe loads are determined through engineering and experimentation. The experimentation is used to gather real-world data, which then is used as input to engineering processes, which then result in guidelines and building codes. This is all updated over time as new materials are introduced and new experience is gained. When there's a situation that is non-...


4

You'll need to check your local codes. In the US, most building code sections begin with a list of definitions, and I assume it's the same elsewhere. If the difference between a shed and a garage is legally significant then they probably define it. It could be based on size, intended use, access to utilities, proximity to other buildings, access to a ...


4

Easy water does not lower hardness. It is some wires you wrap around the pipes that cost $1500 and "magnetize" the limestone so it "will not stick to you pipes and fixtures as much". Look it up under scams, fraud etc...


4

I would advertise "Free Shed" on Craigslist. I had a tree house I constructed for my grand kids, and when they outgrew it that's what I did. Some folks came out one Saturday, disassembled it, and took it away. They did the whole job. I just got to watch.


4

Assuming that the walls are standard wood construction, with dimensional lumber, pulling out the door and putting in a standard entry door is fairly straightforward. First take out the rolling door. It's best to do this in the reverse order that it was put in. Carefully remove / release the tension on any springs or lift assists that may be in place. If the ...


4

If you'd like to minimize use of concrete, don't use any. I have 4 sheds that have been sitting for 14 years on sections of pressure treated wood, set on top of the ground - and a 5th that's on 4 pressure treated wood posts set into the ground. No concrete at all. Wooden floors (not pressure treated - only the ground-contact wood is PT.) Nice and dry.


4

It looks like your building has studs. The best way to insulate between those studs is low-cost batt insulation, either fiberglass or mineral wool. If you want to use polystyrene foam sheets (like the EPS foam you're showing) the easiest and most cost-effective way to do it is to lay it across the studs, not between them. Use the cheap batts between the ...


4

Wire mesh is a good idea in that it maintains the same level of ventilation offered by the current openings. Only you can decide of the ventilation is necessary or desired. I could see problems of blowing and drifting snow getting inside the shed in the winter time and if that is a problem then you may be up to eliminating the openings. If you do decide to ...


4

Fatter is better Upsizing your conduit now costs pennies compared to having to dig it up and replace it later, so I'd put the fattest Schedule 80 PVC you can in now -- at a bare minimum, I'd go with 2", with say 3" being an even better choice if possible. This will also make your pull job easier than if you used the smallest possible conduit -- it might ...


4

You can do this without disturbing the walls or ceiling of the container. Frame thin wall sections on opposite sides (use 2x3s instead of 2x4s to minimize the loss of width). Run 2x3 joists between the two sides at the ceiling. You will then have a free-standing, three-sided structure. With it tight against the walls and ceiling, it can't go anywhere, ...


4

It is fairly common on a flat slab to create a curbing using stubby height concrete blocks. These blocks are typically about 4 to 5 inches in height. When used on a garage (for example) it is typical to place the curbing adjacent to the edge of the slab/foundation. In your case you where you want to inset from the edge of the slab you could choose to apply ...


4

Virtually none. It isn't just about the strength, but the stiffness. It'll flop around like a fresh fish. Take it from someone who has done something similar with 3/4" PVC conduit and found even that lacking when a foot of snow landed on it.


4

As with any structure you need to define the loads on it (wind, snow, furniture, people etc) and from there define the structure or framing capable of supporting those loads. There may well be local codes or regulations that need to be respected as well. Since this does look like a neat design, why not check out a local structural engineer or architect to ...


4

Absolutely doable, though it may take a while. If your goal is to end up with wood that is usable for another project, then hammer and crowbar are the right tools. If your goal is simply to remove the shed and toss everything in a Dumpster, then a cutting tool such as a Sawzall: will make the project much easier. If you plan to reuse the wood, then ...


3

Measure the 2 diagonal distances to the corners. If the measurements are not the same, the floor is not square. Not sure what you are levelling to. A level, framing square, and careful measuring solves most layout problems. 16" spacing is fine as long as your sheathing is rated for 16" spans. Sounds like they are spanning about 6 feet? 16d common nails (3-1/...


3

Look at a flooring store for sheet vinyl also called linoleum, remnants (the end of rolls). They can be inexpensive and would be seamless. An alternative that would be more slip resistant is something we call locally porchpaint. It covers many New england porches. It is only available in gray and is an oil based enamal. You can spread sand on it while wet ...


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