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30

The traditional solution for a pulled out towel rack is to remove the towel rack, patch the holes (usu two on each end) and place the rack slightly higher or lower. An experienced or inventive person can patch the existing hole and, by adding reinforcement, remount in the same location. These racks are secured to a pair of metal brackets on the wall with ...


21

Drywall Anchors I have had 100% success with drywall anchors but I am very careful about all aspects of the mounting hardware. You have to design and execute your plan carefully to have success, otherwise they'll be vulnerable to pulling out as Michael Karas points out. If you mess up any aspect of what I set out below, your anchors will probably pull out....


14

Nylon is self-lubricating. Even when tight it's very slippery against itself. You'll need to increase friction. It may seem counter-intuitive, but you could apply some PTFE (Teflon) plumbing tape to the bolt threads. Even though PTFE is used as a lubricant, it'll thicken the thread diameter and create resistance to movement. Wrap 3-5 layers on the threads ...


13

Get to the Studs Regular anchors are fine for an ordinary towel bar. But not for a grab bar. For regular anchors to work here, you would need to (a) patch the drywall, (b) install the towel bar with heavy-duty anchors and hope the patch is strong enough to hold them and (c) teach the tenant - and future tenants - to not use the towel bar as a grab bar. The ...


13

If I'm not mistaken, you can pull down with some force on the bottom of the spout. If you turn the water on and do that, the water will come out of the shower head until you turn the water off (or until the pressure is low enough).


12

This happens when bathroom fixtures are only fastened to drywall -- such fixtures are easily ripped out. If you have young children, they will be mysteriously compelled to swing like monkeys from these. Don't ask how I know. Here's how I permanently fix such fixtures: Remove the fixture, if it's still partially attached to the wall. Use a 3" hole saw to ...


10

Yes this seems faulty, not just a poor alternative. Installer needs to come back and fix it, at their cost, with proper seal rings ...etc. This is very straightforward and easy work that should and easily could have been done right. In the interim, try to slide a bucket, a container or a lid (inside facing up) under the P trap to collect water and prevent ...


10

Pick up a Diamond Drill Bit for porcelain tile. These don't have a tip so you need to start them at a 45 degree angle and slowly move it perpendicular to the tile. Check out YouTube for videos on proper technique. To make sure it doesn't move on you get a thin piece of plywood with a hole drilled in it. Duct tape the plywood to the tile so the hole in the ...


10

Put a couple of pieces of masking tape on the wall. Then mark the intended hole location, and carefully make small cut in the masking tape. Also scratch an initial divot into the tile. Finally, cordless screwdrivers don't have nearly as accurate bearings as high speed drills, nor do they have as precisely machined collet/chucks. So your drill bit might not ...


10

I've used a scrap of wood of some thickness enough that when the bit goes through it will be held straight. Drill that at the bench. Use carpet tape to attach this block to the tile, and drill through the guide hole. Being tile, you could use whatever strong mounting tape you have handy, and scrape it off when you're done. Point is, it's easy to make a jig ...


9

If you are flexible about the location that the towel bar is mounted then there is a relatively easy path to getting this repaired. There are two main steps involved with this. If you really want to keep the towel hanger in the same location then there is another way you could repair it in place but it involves more work. It's not really hard to do but takes ...


9

Use a small nail set or other hardened metal tool and a hammer to make a tiny chip in the tile glaze. This will entrap the bit tip and allow you to start drilling without walk. It may help to hold the tool at an angle to allow its edge to penetrate the glaze. Be gentle or you can crack the tile. It doesn't take much of a tap.


8

You will find many many installations of towel bars that are simply the crappy drywall anchors on each end. These will work as long as the towel bar is treated with kid gloves. Anything more and eventually the towel bar will end up loose at the wall mounts. If there is not a framed in set of backing behind the towel bar location then your next best bet is ...


8

Since this is being used as a handrail, perhaps it should be supplemented by a proper vertically-mounted hand rail at the corner? You could replace the existing towel rail with something thinner, perfectly adequate for holding towels but too thin to be a handrail. Second option could be to add a backing board behind the rail. This will help spread the ...


8

You can install a reducer, but you'll cut your flow volume by an equal proportion: 28.3in2 - 7.1in2 = 21.2in2 (an area reduction of 75% when going from 6" to 3" duct) This will negate a significant amount of your fan upgrade, will make it work harder, and may shorten the motor's life due to reduced cooling. You might ask yourself whether you really need ...


8

If you had an old faucet with just a valve stem and flat washer, possibly. You could open the old valve and the new valve stem and remove the old one. The water would gush out but when you inserted the new, open valve stem, water would be diverted to the spout and you could probably get it done. On the newer faucets with cartridges, the cartridge needs to be ...


7

I found almost that exact same image behind a bathroom vanity light fixture that I took down to replace. Needless to say I was flabbergasted that such garbage workmanship would be hidden behind a fixture. You should look very closely at what is just behind the place where the romex cable is coming out one hole and reentering the wall cavity at the slot on ...


7

This is so blatantly wrong that I have to think the contractor just forgot to finish it up. It almost looks like a stainless steel drain pipe going into that piece of PVC. Your fix would be fairly easy if you don't want to mess with the contractors. Just get a rubber coupling similar to the one pictures below and remove the PVC pipe from the trap and slide ...


6

The simplest high-strength solution, if there isn't blocking behind the plaster to support it, is to mount the towel rack on an attractive piece of well-varnished wood (or a piece painted to match the room's trim) and mount that to two studs. Obviously this won't suit all tastes. Then again, no towel bar will suit all tastes.


6

I agree that the best solution here is tell your landlord, provided you have a reasonable one. What does your lease say about routine maintenance? Chances are if you weren't doing chinups on it, you shouldn't be charged. However, if you've had a previous experience with this landlord in which they've proved to be unreasonable, you could attempt to fix it ...


6

It is likely that the plastic nut (or bolt it screws to) is stripped. It may feel like it is tightening, but works loose because the threads are damaged. You should grab a set of replacement toilet seat bolts at the plumbing shop, they are (fairly) universal and come in a set of two. You do need to tighten rather firmly, but it is easy to damage plastic ...


6

ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) spec is 33"-36" off the floor for horizontal grab bars. And given 5'-2", I'd lean to the lower end of that scale. Suggest you get one inside and outside the bath at whatever end is used most. ADA.GOV has a lot of good information. (And overkill, like 42" bars at toilets, but I digress.)


6

I have used a drill guide with a suction cup for this which worked very well. You use just position it over your mark carefully and use the suction cup to stick it to the surrounding tiles. The image below shows what it looks like, it comes with various guide holes to match your drill bit. https://www.screwfix.com/p/erbauer-diamond-tile-drill-guide/84524


5

What you need is a valve designed just for shower only. Not a valve assembly with a diverter, which are specifically designed for tub/shower combination: No diverter here, most any manufacturer that you have seen offering the tub/shower valve sets also makes the shower only units. To answer your question, the point of the diverter valve is so you can fill ...


5

If I understand your layout, you could wire it like this: Chaining to all four lights like this requires the use of 12/3 cable for the first two sections, but if you want to follow Tester101's suggestion and add the extra conductor to the fan circuit for possible future use, you're going to buy some 12/3 anyway. EDIT: Carl Witthoft is correct, the bathroom ...


5

You can do a number of things here: Shorten the stud board coming down to the header and move the header up 1.5” to 2” inches (I would do that ) - a nice oscillating cutting tool would make that easy to do right in place. I would then install my cabinet - and I would have a sturdy upper frame for it as well. You could remove it , replace it with something ...


5

Those are anchors and they are installed backwards on the screws. Turn them around the other way, slip them into the holes, and they will spread and hold as the screws are tightened. I don't really like this type of anchor, but if it what is already there I would use it.


5

Let's back up here for just a second and note something You almost certainly don't need a 150CFM fan. So your original fan was a stock 50CFM (probably NuTone or one of its predecessors) that's a 4-sone fan, meaning it sounds like it's been cleared for takeoff when you flip that switch. So you went out and bought this bad boy and though "I'll solve this ...


5

That ladder like thing in a bathroom area is a combination towel rack and heater. The heater is generally used to warm and/or dry the towels but can also lend to taking the chill off the bathroom. It has been my experience to see those mostly in Europe and I cannot actually remember ever seeing one installed in the US but I am sure they are used here.


5

It looks like you have the following The trap arm coming out of the wall is wrong. There should be a compression ring on it. Instead, it has threads. The adapter is to fix the need for two compression rings (this makes your trap contact the floor needlessly) The trap is 1 1/2" The pipe coming up to your drain is 1 1/2" Your sink drain pipe is 1 1/...


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