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32

It appears that the hex sides of that screw head have been rounded off due to the use of an ill-fitting hex wrench. A metric and an SAE hex wrench will both fit in there, but the use of the wrong one, while it feels like it fits properly, can be just loose enough that if the set screw is corroded in a bit, the wrench can slip and round over the edges. You ...


31

What you want is a basin wrench: (Source) The left end pivots so you can reach up under the sink and access the nut. That said, you have some serious corrosion going on there. You might have to go with destructive methods, perhaps involving grinding off the top of the faucet.


26

I mostly agree with FreeMan, but I think this was originally a Torx (six-pointed star) drive. The corners look deeper than I'd expect from an Allen drive. I would get a set of Torx bits and look for the largest one that fits (which is the correct size for any screw head). Gently tap it in with a hammer, then attach the screwdriver or ratchet handle. While ...


12

It's possible to get the hose screwed on by hand tightly enough that it won't leak if your grip is strong enough; I think the strength required is within the normal range for an adult (mine is relatively strong though, so your mileage may vary). But before you get a wrench, there's a couple of things you should check: make sure the threads on the faucet and ...


12

That's just.... nasty. The spout looks fine but the faucet is both too far out and not square. There's a large gap at the base that looks like it can leak water into the wall space. The "plumber" was either drunk, half-asleep or incompetent. There is no excuse for work that sloppy.


11

The most likely scenario is that the work on the system disturbed sediment/debris that migrated to your home water piping, plugging up your faucet aerators. Rather than the "quarter turn" you describe (which would accomplish nothing) it is probable that the aerators were removed, flushed, and reinstalled to restore flow. You should remain diligent, it is ...


11

Find the largest allen or torx wrench or bit that is small enough to fit in the rounded-off hole. Mix up some 5-minute epoxy or epoxy putty, and put a blob of it into the hole. Immediately insert the allen or torx into the epoxied hole and let it harden for 24 hours. You now have a perfect allen or torx cavity with a tool in it. Unscrew carefully. Replace ...


9

I think that is a standard application for a "crows foot" wrench.


9

You could use a box spanner, the pipe will go up the body of the spanner and the pin used to turn the spanner is not fixed. I have used basin wrenches ( I know them as tap wrenches ) but sometime get frustrated with them!


8

If the leak is around the threads themselves (you can tell vs gasket based on where water comes out), teflon tape (sometimes called plumber's tape) exists for this. It's readily available at hardware and home improvement stores, and very inexpensive. Just wrap it around the faucet threads a few time and screw the hose on and it will make a good seal. It's ...


8

Most modern machines will self regulate the amount of water allowed to enter the washer. The typical washing machine is connected to the water supply by a hose. The hoses can fail with age. The most common use of a shut off valve like yours is to stop the flow of water when the machine is not in use. So you would open the valve allow the washing machine to ...


8

What you're after is a tool called a basin wrench: It can reach up behind the sink and tighten those nuts.


8

I think your options are either a Basin Wrench or an extra deep socket


8

It looks to me like the nut on the spout would turn independently of the spout itself. Put the faucet back in its original position and turn that nut while holding the spout stationary. See if you can thread that off and pull the spout out, then you'll be able to rotate the faucet body. If that's not the case, it looks like you'd be able to find a position ...


7

A bit late, but for anyone still wondering I had this problem today. I took two forks and put one prong on each into those little notches and turned counter clockwise until I felt it becoming loose. At that point, I just had to unscrew it a bit more and it came off.


7

Background: All new valves sold in the USA must meet a Federal anti-scald standard meant to prevent sudden surges of hot water. A typical inexpensive 'cycling' anti-scald cartridge works on pressure only, and does not sense temperature. For example you're showering and the sprinklers go off, the cold water pressure drops, and the valve will reduce the hot ...


7

File a bit of steel pipe so that you have two pins that match the notches in the nut - this will lengthen the nut to a point where you can apply normal tools.


7

Hard to know without doing some investigation or starting to take steps to address it and see where it pops out. One thing to try, if you have not, is to flush the fixtures while the end of the faucet or showerhead is off - run 10-20 liters of water though, full-blast, both hot and cold. That should remove anything just sitting in the pipes. You might also ...


7

Your faucet has a removable sprayer part. #2 is the hose that goes to this, it runs through the inside of the faucet and is attached to the faucet temperature valve on one and, and the handheld sprayer on the other end. If you pull the sprayer out, you should see this hose move. #3 is just a weight. This is attached to the hose to help the sprayer slide back ...


6

You should find a set screw under the small colored plug.


6

You're looking at a nut. That ring threads onto the nipple. It may not have been installed correctly. It's intended to be used as a clamp base, with the screws you removed tightening against the upper ring. Partially reinstall the screws and use them to help turn the nut. Spray it with some penetrating oil or WD-40 to help loosen it. You could also ...


6

KY is water soluble, so would be pointless as a lubricant for plumbing fixtures. In a pinch, maybe petroleum jelly would work.


6

The standard tool for these under-sink nuts is a tube spanner: The tube is long enough to go over the thread and the holes take the handle which can be shifted side to side when you're in a confined space. I had a faucet bolt that kept coming loose that I would keep tightening as best I could with a shifter (and grazed knuckles). Once I got a tube spanner, ...


6

Both times I have encountered hose faucets with devices seemingly fused onto the hose threads were when somebody (not me) assembled them without a hose washer. Whether or not this is the case in your situation, you will definitely need to back up your attempts to disconnect the fitting with a substantial wrench on the faucet itself, to prevent twisting the ...


5

A shower faucet cartridge is a type of valve. It's the part that a single handle faucet is moving inside the plumbing fixture to adjust the flow and temperature. They tend to have o-rings and other parts that fail over time, which can result in a variety of issues, including leaks, and the hot and cold water mixing when they shouldn't, even when the fixture ...


5

Over the weekend I determined what the cause was. Thanks to everyone for the helpful suggestions; the actual problem was slightly different. The problem was that the sprayer hose was loose on the sprayer end. Since the hose is pressurized when the faucet is on, this meant that the sprayer leaked a little from the bottom while the water was on, and a little ...


5

When it comes to trim kits for mixer valves, the method of attaching them can differ a lot between manufactures. If you can get the model number of the mixer valve and/or trim kit (trim kit is the handle and escutcheon plate, usually sold together) you can go to the manufactures catalog and see if; 1) different handles are available for the trim kit or 2)...


5

Garden hose gasket, do you have one? They like to fall out and get lost, and without one it can become nearly impossible to tighten the connection up hard enough to prevent leakage.


5

Try tightening the packing nut (the hex part the stem goes through) a little. That's what it's for. Don't overdo it. The "packing" is the material that seals around the stem - the packing nut compresses that material. On a valve that is not used often, actuating the valve does commonly cause it to leak, as things have "set." Tighten a little, wait, tighten a ...


5

It looks like a tamper-resistant hex screw. There are specific wrenches for these. Images and links are for illustration only, not an endorsement of goods or sources.


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