Hot answers tagged

29

Yes, ball valves or quarter turn valves tend to be more reliable than globe valves. Globe valves require a washer and a tight friction fit between the seat and washer, and if either of these wear out (which they do over time), leaks start. Ball valves are much simpler in construction. A downside to ball valves is that they are more difficult to get ...


17

That is not a standard garden hose fitting. Instead it looks to be part of a anti-siphon adapter where the other part was unscrewed to reveal the inner section of the unit. The regular hose thread coupling would have been on the down stream part of the missing part. It will be unlikely that you can find just half of a anti-siphon adapter that would screw on ...


14

If a valve has directionality, it will almost universally be cast as an arrow in of the body, as seen in this globe (aka stop) valve: I've never seen a ball valve that is directional. If you look inside, you'll see the guts of it are symmetrical. I would say the general rules of thumb for this are: If you can even change the handle direction, be sure that ...


13

The quarter turn valves usually have a few things going for them: Clear indication of whether it is on or off They (at least in my experience) seize less often, and the handle shape gives more leverage for turning it. Less clearance needed around the valve


12

You need to drain the water from the heating system, effect the remove and replace, then refill the heating system. Some circulating-water heating systems are filled with tap water from the home's water supply, while others are isolated from the water supply plumbing and are filled with some other liquid. My experience is entirely with the most common tap ...


8

To answer your question; A ball valve only controls flow not pressure. A few seconds after water is flowing a ball valve will limit the pressure based on the flow. A pressure regulator requires no more plumbing than a ball valve. A regulator will limit the maximum pressure but not flow until the set point is reached. If you can answer the question. Why do ...


8

Heating systems can vary by region. I have answered this from a UK perspective as you appear to have bought from B&Q. If the broken part is the white thermostatic cap, then it would be much easier to find a compatible replacement to avoid having to change the valve body. The cap can be removed by undoing the knurled ring directly below it, finger force ...


7

Background: All new valves sold in the USA must meet a Federal anti-scald standard meant to prevent sudden surges of hot water. A typical inexpensive 'cycling' anti-scald cartridge works on pressure only, and does not sense temperature. For example you're showering and the sprinklers go off, the cold water pressure drops, and the valve will reduce the hot ...


6

That has nothing to do with your heating system. That is an old telephone jack box. If you move that cover in the Open direction, you should see it uncover a 4 wire telephone jack. The slot is to allow the wire to come out while you close it back. Here is one photo of a new one... I'll look for something better telephone jack


5

The standard pressure test for new natural gas or propane pipe in my area (NW Oregon) is something anyone can do. Same for installing the gas line. (Why are there so many naysayers on a DIY forum? This is not rocket science:   Just a few new skills to learn.) Before installing the gas pipe, I consulted with a pro (paid $80 for an hour of onsite ...


5

Saddle valves are terrible as actual valves. They are a cheap/easy way to tap an existing water line, but that's it. After you use them a few times, you just can't rely on the needle to cleanly seal against the punctured hole of the copper pipe, and to cleanly come back out again. In your case it also looks like there may be some galvanic corrosion on the ...


5

Ed has the important part of the answer. Saddle valves are trouble, and since you're not using it, it's easy to eliminate. Even if you were using it, it makes sense to replace with a soldered-in valve. If this is copper tubing, it might be pretty easy to replace this valve with a slip coupling. It is especially easy if the tubing is long enough to flex it ...


5

No, they don't generally have such an outlet. Perhaps you are looking for an Automatic Washing Machine Shutoff Valve? These devices sense when the washing machine is using electricity and open the water supply valves. Once the machine stops using electricity (i.e., the cycle is done) then the valves shut. Many models also include additional features such as ...


5

It's called a pressure reducing valve (PRV) That's a PRV with a shut off and set point. The knob on the bottom is the shut off and the bigger knob with the screw is the set point. Now that you've adjusted it with pressure in the system you may have lowered it and you may need to remove some water to determine the set point. From the picture it looks like you'...


5

Your previous owner may have used those tablets in the tank that dissolve slowly and release chlorine or sodium hypochlorite (bleach). That tends to attack just about everything over time. The INTENT of those tablets is for the bleach to get down into the BOWL to help keep it clean when you flush. If you seldom flush it, the bleach tablets still dissolve ...


5

NO , a ball valve only will control flow. If you even allow a slight orifice the size of a human hair with time the chamber pressure would be at 800 psi. I would look for a used scuba regulator they can handle up to 3000 psi and the first stage around 135psi , their actual output pressure can be adjusted a little. I mention this because I used an old ...


4

Just got the diverter out of the wall. It turns out the diverter was threaded in and needed to be removed. Here's a picture of the full diverter. The piece on the upper-right was what needed to be un-threaded. A pair of vice grips and a hammer did the trick:


4

Have you opened all the other water faucets in the home and flushed the toilets? There may be water in the line. The only other idea is that your water heater and water softener unit may be trying to fill up, causing low water pressure. Make sure there are no other water leaks. I too am not a pro but can figure things out. I had to replace the on/off valve ...


4

According to Grohe, the manufacturer of the valve I am using, this is normal behavior for their valves. The max ratio they provide is 95% hot/5% cold. They also said this is true for their thermostatic valves.


4

The first thing you should do it check your static (no flow) water pressure and the pressure with water flowing. Find a place where you can attach a pressure gauge and check the pressure with and without flow. You need to find out if this is truly a pressure issue or if the issue is related to restricted flow. Check the static and flow pressure both ...


4

Yes, it's good possibility that if you don't purposefully depressurize the lines first, you will get spray. But this is easy to do. Turn off the hot water heater. If it's electric, there is usually an off position on the knob on the front, or turn it off at the breaker panel. If it's gas, just turn the knob to pilot. Turn off the cold water supply to the ...


4

It's not "backwards" or a "mistake" at all - it's perfectly standard for dual (separate hot/cold control) faucets. In a sink deployment, you pull the outside (away from the faucet) of the handle forward to open, and push it back to close - that requires the hot and cold to close in "different directions" from a clock-wise perspective - which is perfectly ...


4

A sphere allows for sealing with simple o-rings in a flat configuration. This simplifies design, component acquisition, assembly, and repair and maintenance.


4

Stopcocks use a cylindrical axle. Ball valves use less metal and are more reliable because the seal is a simple circle, whereas in a stopcock an entire surface has to mate. As far as machining is concerned, it is cheaper to make a ball than to make a cylinder of the same diameter and the same finish grade.


4

If the drain isn't at the bottom of the tank, then yes it's normal and yes you should tilt the compressor to correct that before blowing out the water.


4

That is either a painted or plated 1/2" copper line. If it is plated, the plating is failing or failed. Either way take a strip of emery cloth and clean it up before adding the compression fitting


4

As long as the oven only needs the output from 3/8" then there is no issue with this at all. I would think that that 3/8" could supply any home oven (that's still a lot of gas) so I don't think there is an issue at all. If the manufacturer agrees then there is no reason for you to worry about it. Frankly the installer probably installed the shut-off that ...


4

Those are called stop valves; when configured with the outlet(s) at 90° from the inlet they are commonly called angle stop valves. Yours look like dual outlet stop valves. To shut them off you turn the oval shaped knob clockwise all the way. Internally, your valves use a bibb washer and seat assembly to effect shut off. It is very common for the bibb washer ...


4

A coupling and another piece of pipe can be used to tighten a close nipple. You can't grip the threads with a wrench without damaging them. Some nipple extractors only work in one direction, but if the tool is called an "internal pipe wrench" it can work in both directions to tighten or remove a nipple. Sample internal pipe wrench


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