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10

As long as the p-trap is lower than the drainage from the basin then you can install it. It can also be lower than your exit pipe you need to drain into You attach the p-trap directly to the drainage and manuever the p-traps exits into you existing drain. It is not ideal to have the p-trap below the the exit drain because water gravity has to force the ...


8

Here is what I ended up with. It doesn't contradict the code and inspector signed all the papers. I am not sure if he really looked at it, though.


7

First really look for the watermarks. These are usually ultrafaint in a corner. They could even be upside down. Second look for any chips on the edges. If there are chips it isn't tempered. Third if you need the hole just drill it. Use the smallest bit you have to start and work your way to the size you need. Wear gloves but putting a tiny hole in ...


5

That piece looks to just be a single curve (bent in a single axis), so it's possible to do yourself, but it's not necessarily the easiest thing to do, and you can get some optical distortion depending on how evenly you flex it. If I were to do it, I'd do the following: Trace the inside contour onto a piece of wood. Make multiple wood pieces, slightly under ...


5

The question depends entirely on whether the fixture acts as its own junction box, with full containment and a strain relief clamp. If it includes a UL listed enclosure, all good. The instructions should make this fairly clear. If not, grab an old work (remodeler) box and pop it in. Be sure you'll clear your studs before you start cutting drywall.


4

You should be able to find a P-trap assembly available at any local hardware store. The horizontal section should attach directly to the drain line coming out of the wall, while the vertical end should accept the tail piece from the sink.


4

It turns out there is no additional tile of the same size/style/color available, so this idea has been scrapped. For those who may stumble upon it in the future however, I offer the following... If we had tile to match, I could have gently removed the cut tiles, and replaced them with whole tiles, after filling the under-tile void, continuing the patterns ...


3

Your vanity plan should have front side doors in line with where the sink is located. Then the drawers should be off to the left or right side where there is plenty of height and space toward the back to accommodate their placement. There are multiple reasons to not put drawers in the vanity under the sink area: People stand in front of the vanity at the ...


3

It would not be uncommon to install blocking around on the inside top edge of the vanity cabinet to butt up against the top assembly to hold it level without the top rocking around. Such blocking could be pieces of wood 3/4" thick that you glue or screw to the cabinet sides at the necessary height. As far as that edge along the sides....only you the ...


3

Cut that pipe out in 2 places. One place is above the bottom shelf of the new cabinet and mid way between the 2 fittings on the upper pipe that goes at a 45 degree angle. Recouple it back together when the cabinet is installed. The supply lines need to be relocated too, but you may be able to move them around to get past their issues. The cutting of the ...


3

Standard bathroom vanities were made at 32" years ago when many homes typically were 2/1's with a shared bathroom. That means parents and children would be using the same vanity. To accomodate children, vanities were lowered to 32" which is standard height. Now that many homes have multiple bathrooms and even a dedicated bathroom for each room in the ...


3

I presume the sink is faux marble. Try Lime Away. Or C.L.R. - they should remove it without hurting the surface. Comet bathroom cleaner (The squirt kind) works good on light rust spots, but would take a while on really severe spots.


3

In the UK there services popping up that offer profesional 3D printing For example 3D Print UK They offer help designing product and i think the max sizes are something like 2.5metres by 1metre. They charge £2 per square cm of material used. In order for it to diffuse light like you require you will need quite a thin print out (cheaper so that's good) ...


3

I think all of the comments are pretty spot on - unless a friend of yours has a large 3D printer, getting a single part made is going to be very expensive. Producing the part is actually not the expensive part, but building the molds used to produce the part can be VERY expensive. So expensive that often times a company might only have a single mold of any ...


3

I wouldn't recommend the glue on idea. I would relocate the knobs slightly.


3

30" clear across so 15" from center of the flange to either side is the minimum. There is a little wiggle room like 1/2-1" less on one side if the other side is completely open and you have to consider the size of the occupants.


2

Is the mirror one piece or is it made of tiles? Is it glued in place or supported by clips, brackets, or a frame? If it is mounted (clips, brackets, or frame) carefully unmount it, have it professionally cut, and then remount it. I strongly advise hiring a professional window or glass man to do this. If it is glued but is made of tiles: Locate a supply ...


2

Screw it to the wall. A typical vanity has a wood strip along the upper back. Run some screws through the strip into the studs in the wall. Do not use long screws. You run the risk of screwing a long screw into a pipe in the wall.


2

Yes, you can reroute the pipe. 1) Draw a diagram mapping out how you want the pipe rerouted. Use 90 degree angles and remember you need to leave room for the trap which in your case will be an "S" trap (so named because it looks like an S that's been rotated 90 degrees. This looks like inch and a half pipe but you can cut a piece off the top and take it ...


2

There are several stain-like finishes for wood: Penetrating stain - can only be used on unfinished wood. Several coats can be used to even the tone and make it slightly darker. Once the wood has a finish coat, it will only sit on the surface, and usually looks bad. (Most are solvent based, but there are also water based stains) Varnish/poly stain - this is ...


2

The makers of those tops will have the seam adhesive to join the tops permanently. If they are anything like Corian by Dupont, they want to protect their warranty. You may need to do some convincing to an installer to sell you the adhesive you need. It can be done, I have done it before. It takes a router or a belt sander to get the joint down flush after ...


2

I would probably just cut out section of subfloor around this mess, and the section of drywall, and then re-route everything (under the subfloor) so the pipes come out of the wall. It's not that difficult, and it's probably less work than modifying cabinets and doing the creative plumbing necessary to get this to work. Of course, this might also mean ...


2

I have the same problem. These doors are crap. The backings are 1/8" fiber board glued to the mirror glass. This 'fake' wood is warping from bathroom moisture, hence the mirrors are becoming unglued and starting to flop. I am considering replacing this cabinet instead (with a higher quality more pricey one, sigh!), since the 2nd (of 3) door hinges broke ...


2

The source depends a lot on how the surface of the lighted mirror border is created. If the same sheet of glass forms the mirror and the lighted border area then this is certainly a specially made glass. Such glass would have the mirror finish applied across the back with the border edges chemically etched to create a frosted glass behind which the back ...


2

If the particle board is stable I would suggest spraying the affected areas down with hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide will kill mold and not smell as bad as using bleach. (Bleach will also kill the Mold but may cause more damage than peroxide.) After you are sure the mold is gone if the wood is stable it should be ok. Left untreated this could cause ...


2

Your number one concern should be to thoroughly dry all wet materials. Understand that many materials may be wet that you are unaware of. For example, by looking at the photo, I would presume that you have substantial moisture under and behind the vanity. This moisture has probably affected your wall and floor systems to some degree. If you do not dry all ...


2

I might be wrong, but I'm "Picturing" (hint-hint) that you have a Regular T which has both drains aligned with each other & gravity's supposed to drop the water down the drain that's perfectly in the middle of both sinks. Like this. This might be what was previously there & was fine. But, did you change anything like the vertical heights of ...


2

As country handyman says, if the're already supplying enough you don't need to change them. However, if you're seeing a temp increase when you flush, then you ARE losing pressure, and the hot is making up for it, unbalancing your temperature. I'll wager a guess that the pipe is currently 1/4 inch and that the toilet is fed before the sink. If that's the ...


2

In my experience the normal, common way to attach such a top also fills any gaps, since it's good old silicone caulking - White or brown would seem like a good choice here. You can also attach by other means if you like and then caulk to seal and conceal. And you certainly should shim (or sand/grind the high spots on the base) to get it level. If the gap is ...


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