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59

It depends on the type of bulb. Regular incandescents won't consume any electricity if the bulb is dead, since there's no continuous path for the current to take. It's just like an open switch. With CFLs and LEDs, it depends on why the bulb burned out, but in general they will consume some amount of electricity even when burned out. Some CFLs may even ...


38

Yes. The fixture is concerned with heat. Your LED light bulb makes about 9 watts of heat. Your fixture is rated for a bulb that makes 40 watts of heat. With an incandescent bulb, 98-99% of its wattage turns directly into heat. Even LEDs, 90% of their wattage turns into heat. For thermal planning, it's not worth pulling out the calculator. You're "close ...


32

Yes, it is because of the heat buildup in enclosed fixtures, and no you should not use the bulb in that ceiling fixture you listed unless you are willing to accept shortened bulb life. Your options are: Use the bulb in that fixture anyway and accept that they may burn out or dim prematurely Get LED bulbs that are approved for enclosed fixtures, e.g. many ...


21

Gotta tell you, I tried the same thing long ago. Learn from my stupidity. LOL Seems that regular bulbs really don't like the high heat or getting splattered with cooking juices, shatter at the first contact with liquid. Think you better spend the couple of extra $$$ and not have to clean up a shattered glass mess in your oven.


20

Usually at least one of the "claws" is spring-loaded, and can be pulled straight out to release the glass.


20

SHORT ANSWER: NO PROBLEM LONG ANSWER: The maximum wattage limits are largely a function of heat. For incandescent lights, more wattage means more heat. And too much of a heat buildup could result in shorter bulb life and even risk of fire, especially in a fixture in which the bulbs are fully enclosed. While lighting has traditionally been sold by wattage, ...


19

Even if LED or even CFL bulbs create far less waste heat than a conventional lightbulb, they react far more adversely to the heating resulting from ANY waste heat. A lightbulb won't care if it is in an ambient temperature of 500°F, actually it will run more efficiently - anything with electronics in it is hard to make in a way that it will survive long in ...


15

What you are looking for is a 40A15 Appliance Rated Lamp. If you can find 130V buy it, but the lamp does not stay on long enough to really matter. Believe or not it's the same as what is in your refrigerator. I did a quick search and this is what the Home Depot says (I don't work for them, actually they are the competition, kind of): The GE ...


13

Five years gone, here's the situation in America today: March 2016. Or rather, shops near Berkeley, California, which had a big hand in development of the CFL. Target. Incandescent bulbs (tweaked to be somewhat more efficient with halogens and high-temp inner bulbs) are readily available, four for $5. Pretty close to the old 1980s price for quality ...


13

We have had CFL's in a number of enclosed fixtures for years now. They generate comparable light for much less heat. The main thing you need to worry about with CFLs is, you can't use them on a dimmer unless that dimmer is designed for them. Other than that - less heat means even less risk of fire in my book.


11

From the GE website: Compact fluorescent light bulbs may generally be used in enclosed fixtures as long as the enclosed fixture is not recessed. Totally enclosed recessed fixtures (for example, a ceiling can light with a cover over the bulb) create temperatures that are too high to allow the use of a compact fluorescent bulb.


11

Often times the lower round spindle piece of the lamp will screw off. Then the lower metal parts can be lowered down along with the glass pieces to permit access to the bulbs.


10

For this to happen there must be some voltage to the light socket. It may not be noticeable with a standard incandescent bulb because it apparently is not the full voltage and current. If you are comfortable in what you are doing, you could measure the voltage across the two wires and ground to see what you get. Incorrect wiring could be the problem, such as ...


9

Does your ceiling fan wobble? Shaking a light bulb can break the filament. See How do I balance a ceiling fan? Is your line voltage reliable? An electrician told me once that he swears by 130V-rated bulbs. If voltage surges a little, the 130V bulb will tolerate it better than lower-rated bulbs. The rating is printed on the top of the bulb. However, if this ...


9

It looks like a G9 base for a halogen lamp.


8

After an hour of searching google Home Depot Looks like your light Taking the description from the Home Depot page, I found this PDF for installation instructions PDF Looking at the PDF and the photos, it looks like there is a white trim ring around the glass. Instead of prying from the trim that touches the ceiling, see if theres another lip closer to ...


8

First, make sure the fixture is switched off. Using a small piece of cloth, to protect your fingers in case the bulb breaks, grab the bulb firmly near the base, and rock it slightly back and forth (left to right), so that you are alternately pulling on one pin, then the other. Once the pins start to move you will probably be able to pull it straight out. ...


8

It's done for anti-shatter, the silicone keeps the glass shards together. According to their product sheet, "Safety coated glass for shatter resistance provides a protective shield to safely contain the glass if the bulb should break" It first came out being used on incandescent bulbs for mechanic's trouble lights.


8

For a multi-bulb fixture the LED units do not want to be in the area where high heat is generated as would be the case with incandescent or especially with halogen bulbs. CFLs have their own special considerations if they are used in situations with special types of lamp dimmers. Such special dimmers may not be compatible with LED lighting modules. ...


7

As of 2017, regulatory changes in the United States have obsoleted most of the answers here (and elsewhere on the Internet). Short answer: Edison screw-type bases aren't going away. The US Department of Energy no longer considers lamp base when certifying Energy Star luminaires and lamps. Lamp base can even be changed without having to re-certify the ...


7

The US 120 volt screw base is an E26. The 'E' indicates an Edison screw base and 26 is the diameter in millimeters. Source: Wikipedia (footnote 3) In 120-volt North America and 100-volt Japan, the standard size for general-purpose lamps is E26


7

It's a CFL globe, but it's either a very old (early prototype) model that warms up slowly or it's simply worn out. Also, according to DoxyLover... ...the glow is starting at the ends of the fluorescent tubing (which are near the base). This causes the part of the tube near the top to cast a shadow on the globe. This is why [it may appear that] the ...


6

The CFL light bulbs tend to generate less heat; however, they are much more sensitive to heat. If the excess heat cannot escape in a timely manner, eventually the electronics within the light bulb will burn out, even though the fluorescent tube will be fine. Since these are not bulbs with replaceable ballasts or starters, effectively you'll have to throw ...


6

A cause of this could be an electronic/magenetic dimmer on the light versus a standard single pole single throw (SPST) switch. The electronic/magentic dimmers leak a very small amount of current. With incadescent lights, there is not enough power to cause the filament to glow, however it is enough to cause your flourecent light to intermittently light up. ...


6

I'm in same boat. When I redid the house I'm in, I installed as much LED lighting as I could and the rest is halogen. What I've learned is, dimming range is based completely on the driver in the LED bulb. And most LED bulbs will only dim to about 20-30% of there maximum. I'm sure you know how dimmers work, but for those that don't it is basically a ...


6

If it says 60 watts max, then the maximum wattage bulb you can safely use is 60 watts. If you could find a 3-way incandescent bulb like a 20-40-60, that would be safe. But I've never seen one that small. With such a low acceptable wattage, the lamp may have been designed with CFL or LED lamps in mind, you can get something like an 11-23-34 Watt CFL 3-way ...


6

Those are 2 or 4 pin CFL bulbs. Sorta like this: Technically, you should handle them with care, as the contents of the tubes are toxic. Turn off the power to the light, wear sturdy gloves, and pull the bottom part of the bulb straight out of the socket. (Straight out means the direction that the tubes were going.) With this end in a plastic baggie, you'...


6

The best explanation I can think of is that many compact fluorescent(CFL) and LED bulbs are not compatible with dimmers. The reason why is non-dimmable CFLs cannot and should not ever be used with dimmer switches. and To put it in layman's terms, most modern dimmer switches essentially function the same way as if you were to turn a light on and off ...


5

Is your switch lighted/illuminated (something like the picture)? When I put in CFL bulbs in sockets with lighted switches we got the same situation that you described. I believe the cause is the same as what @Steven already described. As for a solution, that might be a good topic for a new question. :)


5

I don't know codes. But from the standpoint of dissipation of energy I can't imagine how putting something that dissipates less power as heat (most of a light bulb's power consumption ends up as heat) could be less safe than an equivalent wattage light bulb. That is, if you replace something that used to use 60W (mostly ending up as heat) with something that ...


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