Hot answers tagged

60

It depends on the type of bulb. Regular incandescents won't consume any electricity if the bulb is dead, since there's no continuous path for the current to take. It's just like an open switch. With CFLs and LEDs, it depends on why the bulb burned out, but in general they will consume some amount of electricity even when burned out. Some CFLs may even ...


40

As already stated, LEDs can't take the heat. In addition: Many ovens use halogen bulbs instead of "ordinary" incandescent bulbs. These are a type of incandescent light with two key differences: size and heat. The size is irrelevant for most ordinary lamps but great for an oven, where you want something small so that it won't take away from ...


39

Yes. The fixture is concerned with heat. Your LED light bulb makes about 9 watts of heat. Your fixture is rated for a bulb that makes 40 watts of heat. With an incandescent bulb, 98-99% of its wattage turns directly into heat. Even LEDs, 90% of their wattage turns into heat. For thermal planning, it's not worth pulling out the calculator. You're "close ...


35

Yes, it is because of the heat buildup in enclosed fixtures, and no you should not use the bulb in that ceiling fixture you listed unless you are willing to accept shortened bulb life. Your options are: Use the bulb in that fixture anyway and accept that they may burn out or dim prematurely Get LED bulbs that are approved for enclosed fixtures, e.g. many ...


21

SHORT ANSWER: NO PROBLEM LONG ANSWER: The maximum wattage limits are largely a function of heat. For incandescent lights, more wattage means more heat. And too much of a heat buildup could result in shorter bulb life and even risk of fire, especially in a fixture in which the bulbs are fully enclosed. While lighting has traditionally been sold by wattage, ...


20

Usually at least one of the "claws" is spring-loaded, and can be pulled straight out to release the glass.


20

Even if LED or even CFL bulbs create far less waste heat than a conventional lightbulb, they react far more adversely to the heating resulting from ANY waste heat. A lightbulb won't care if it is in an ambient temperature of 500°F, actually it will run more efficiently - anything with electronics in it is hard to make in a way that it will survive long in ...


16

Here is what the process of pulling the cover down will look like. The bulb is inside. If you can't get your fingers around it to unscrew it and need to use the suction cup, you can squeeze the spring clips and remove the entire trim ring assembly. Pay attention to how it came out, you'll need to reverse that process to get it back in.


13

Five years gone, here's the situation in America today: March 2016. Or rather, shops near Berkeley, California, which had a big hand in development of the CFL. Target. Incandescent bulbs (tweaked to be somewhat more efficient with halogens and high-temp inner bulbs) are readily available, four for $5. Pretty close to the old 1980s price for quality ...


12

Not gonna happen. Can't take the heat. Those consumer products one calls an "LED light bulb" is a built consumer product made of components - case, heat sink, electronics and an array of LED emitters. The latter are purchasable as components by electronics supply houses such as mouser.com, with over 100,000 types listed. Every one has a data ...


11

Often times the lower round spindle piece of the lamp will screw off. Then the lower metal parts can be lowered down along with the glass pieces to permit access to the bulbs.


11

Try grabbing the trim ring underneath the edges and pulling straight down. They usually have a springy bracket that holds them in place. Once down, the bulb will be exposed.


11

I think it's unlikely that this is possible. The environment in the oven in quite mild compared with an incandescent lamp, but LEDs, being semiconductor devices generally don't function well above about 100C. Some vendors seem to be making newer ovens with insulated or otherwise thermally isolated lamp compartments so that they can install LED lighting but ...


9

It looks like a G9 base for a halogen lamp.


9

Even if you could, I wouldn't trust that the plastics, solder and semiconductors of an LED lamp wouldn't leach unfriendly chemicals out into the oven's air, and then into the food. There's a reason they tell hobbyists to not use food ovens for "re-flowing" (building or fixing) electronic circuit boards.


8

For a multi-bulb fixture the LED units do not want to be in the area where high heat is generated as would be the case with incandescent or especially with halogen bulbs. CFLs have their own special considerations if they are used in situations with special types of lamp dimmers. Such special dimmers may not be compatible with LED lighting modules. ...


8

It's done for anti-shatter, the silicone keeps the glass shards together. According to their product sheet, "Safety coated glass for shatter resistance provides a protective shield to safely contain the glass if the bulb should break" It first came out being used on incandescent bulbs for mechanic's trouble lights.


8

As of 2017, regulatory changes in the United States have obsoleted most of the answers here (and elsewhere on the Internet). Short answer: Edison screw-type bases aren't going away. The US Department of Energy no longer considers lamp base when certifying Energy Star luminaires and lamps. Lamp base can even be changed without having to re-certify the ...


7

I'm in same boat. When I redid the house I'm in, I installed as much LED lighting as I could and the rest is halogen. What I've learned is, dimming range is based completely on the driver in the LED bulb. And most LED bulbs will only dim to about 20-30% of there maximum. I'm sure you know how dimmers work, but for those that don't it is basically a ...


7

The US 120 volt screw base is an E26. The 'E' indicates an Edison screw base and 26 is the diameter in millimeters. Source: Wikipedia (footnote 3) In 120-volt North America and 100-volt Japan, the standard size for general-purpose lamps is E26


7

It's a CFL globe, but it's either a very old (early prototype) model that warms up slowly or it's simply worn out. Also, according to DoxyLover... ...the glow is starting at the ends of the fluorescent tubing (which are near the base). This causes the part of the tube near the top to cast a shadow on the globe. This is why [it may appear that] the ...


7

This is really an opinion question, so I will just explain the color frequency and a listing to look for so that you have the information to make your decision. First, the different lamps have color ratings: 2500k through 6500k is the normal range. The color at 2500 is a yellow orange; many street lights using sodium vapor lamps are this color; very easy on ...


7

On many types of fixtures... You just unscrew the bulb! On those fixtures there is a small margin between the bezel and the flat lensed/Fresnel'd surface. That flat surface is the bulb. See, it looks like this... So how do you grab a flat flush bulb? Suction cup.


6

The LED is the most dimming-friendly light source ever made. The problem is that most people are using screw-in "incandescent replacement" LED modules, with obsolete dimming schemes** intended for incandescent lights (which just don't have the refinement to perform well in the low range). This is the ugliest hack in electrical design, and produces ugly-...


6

If it says 60 watts max, then the maximum wattage bulb you can safely use is 60 watts. If you could find a 3-way incandescent bulb like a 20-40-60, that would be safe. But I've never seen one that small. With such a low acceptable wattage, the lamp may have been designed with CFL or LED lamps in mind, you can get something like an 11-23-34 Watt CFL 3-way ...


6

I called the number on the box to ask the company in ref to the "caution notice" about "Not for use in totally enclosed luminaries". They said that it could shorten the life of the bulb. I asked about an overheating situation/potential of fire and they said that there is a device built in the blub that prevents this from happening. I think that if the light ...


6

Those are 2 or 4 pin CFL bulbs. Sorta like this: Technically, you should handle them with care, as the contents of the tubes are toxic. Turn off the power to the light, wear sturdy gloves, and pull the bottom part of the bulb straight out of the socket. (Straight out means the direction that the tubes were going.) With this end in a plastic baggie, you'...


6

The best explanation I can think of is that many compact fluorescent(CFL) and LED bulbs are not compatible with dimmers. The reason why is non-dimmable CFLs cannot and should not ever be used with dimmer switches. and To put it in layman's terms, most modern dimmer switches essentially function the same way as if you were to turn a light on and off really,...


6

JC : J From the word “Jod” – It means “Iodine” in German and indicates that it is a Halogen lamp. C From the word “Cine” Indicates that the primary application for lamp is Cinema but can include Optics & Projection & Other Markets This halogen bulb is a low voltage bulb, commonly found under counters, in desk lamps, or as accent lighting. This type ...


6

Thos MR16 GU5.3 light bulbs are 12 volt bulbs. The GU10 bulbs are 120 volt. There is little to zero chance that this is some sort of "Dual Socket". And if it were, it would still likely be just a 12 volt supply. The round things in the picture are rivets that hold the fixture together. To brighten the fixture, I'd recommend a bright, new LED bulb. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible