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49

With the power off at the breaker, and verified with a non-contact tester, I've always just used a pair of needle nose pliers to grip the rim of the bulb base and turn it to remove. If the bulb is really stuck you might try spraying some WD40 around it. A similar alternative, as others have mentioned in the comments, is to expand a pair of pliers inside of ...


37

Take a piece of duct tape and wrap it in the shape of an "O", with the sticky side of the tape on the outside. Stick the loop of tape to the face of the light bulb such that it is secure. Put your hand (four fingers) inside the loop and twist counterclockwise to loosen the bulb. Credit: https://youtu.be/NNGyhRu7c0I?t=2m


32

In a pinch, if you lack a bulb remover, you can use a potato to remove a broken light bulb. Essentually, you just cut it to a size that'll fit into the socket, but engage with whatever's left of the broken bulb, then twist. This youtube video illustrates the technique.


25

If you are not removing more drywall than needed for the new recessed lights, then no per 334.30(B)(1) (assuming you are using NM cable). There are similar clauses for other flexible cable assemblies (e.g. AC/MC). However, if you are removing drywall as part of the remodel and have access to the studs, then you do need to secure and support according the ...


19

Get a light bulb changer pole at your local home improvement store or your favorite hardware store. The ones with suction cups are best for flood lights, where the face of the bulb is a little flatter, but might have a tougher time gripping smaller, rounder light bulbs where you need something that can fit up inside the fixture and grip the sides of the bulb....


16

National Electrical Code is pretty clear on this, at least as of the 2014 version. It says that if the fixture is above the tub or shower, and within 8 ft. vertically from the top of the bathtub rim or shower threshold, the fixture must be rated for damp locations. If the fixture may be subject to shower spray, it has to be rated for wet locations. If it ...


12

I've never been all that comfortable with @Steven's solution, as it's hard to be sure the power to the light is off when the bulb is broken so you can check, unless you shut off the whole house (or the circuits are actually really well labeled.) Pull-chain switched lights and 3-way switched lights are particularly difficult in this regard. So I bought a ...


12

There's a company that makes suction cup hooks/hangers. You put the suction cup on an object and swing the hook. I'll bet you could attach one of these to the glass and use it to unscrew the bulb. I found this on Amazon. Edit: if the bottom of the bulb is highly curved, this won't work. The surface has to be flat or only slightly curved.


12

If you search this on the internet you will find the fixture can be disassembled and the j-box can be accessed through the hole that the fixture is in. Therefore the joints are still accessible. Like here. If you bury a box under drywall it does not meet the definition of accessible according the Code since you would have to remove a portion of the building ...


9

Another trick is to pull the trim out with the bulb but not all trims connect the same. Some use springs, some clip into a socket, while others are sealed. But usually works for me because I do it all the time.


9

LED (and other) light bulbs are available in a variety of different color temperatures. Look at the packaging for the bulbs you bought. Are they labelled as "cool white" or "daylight" with a color temperature around 4000K? Just return them and get something labelled "warm white" or "soft white", with a color temperature around 2700-3000K. While you could ...


9

Electricians "fish" wires through existing homes by the thousands every day without stapling. Staple if you can (every 4' in attics, within 12" of all boxes), and don't if you can't. Use some common sense to prevent any future damage to the wiring by avoiding sharp or metallic objects or high-traffic areas.


9

In addition to good answers by @statuephemism and @isherwood, it's worth mentioning why you might want to staple and why in your case it probably doesn't matter. First reason to staple is to keep wires out of the way so they don't get accidentally trapped when fitting new drywall on a ceiling for instance. This isn't relevant if the ceiling is already in ...


8

The shroud around the bulb should just pull down and out a few inches before the tension wires lock. If it seems really solid then someone probably painted then replaced before drying and glued it there with the paint. Try using a flat scraper or 5in1 between ceiling and ring.


8

Removing this box is not a good solution when there are rigid conduits bringing wires into this existing box. The main reason for this is that those wires would still need to terminate into an accessible junction box. On top of that there is just no simple way to adapt the existing rigid conduits for connection to the floating connection box on a recessed ...


8

You need to stop destroying stuff right now. Since your project is this light, you are assuming the universe is gracious enough to have ALL the wires in these conduits be ONLY about this light. That is a faulty assumption. There could be other circuits you don't know about; your plans could break them. Now to start with, nobody uses conduit for their ...


7

Use oven mitts with silicone grips Works like magic for opening light fixtures, changing light bulbs, opening jars, and so on. If you don't have silicone oven mitts, you can try a silicone baking mat. Just push the mat against the face of the light bulb and unscrew it.


6

No, you should not have to replace both of the existing switches on each circuit. You won't be able to dim from both ends, of course. You just need a "3-Way LED Dimmer" and follow the appropriate wiring. Replace one of the switches (on each set of lights that have two switches) with the dimmer - the other switch will turn them on or off, at wherever the ...


6

First the good news: Electrically it would be fine as long as the PAR38 bulb's wattage does not exceed the receptacle's maximum wattage. In the case of an LED bulb replacing an incandescent household bulb, you'll most likely be replacing a higher-wattage bulb with a lower-wattage bulb, but you should check the specs to be sure. Now the bad news: PAR38 and ...


6

Thos MR16 GU5.3 light bulbs are 12 volt bulbs. The GU10 bulbs are 120 volt. There is little to zero chance that this is some sort of "Dual Socket". And if it were, it would still likely be just a 12 volt supply. The round things in the picture are rivets that hold the fixture together. To brighten the fixture, I'd recommend a bright, new LED bulb. ...


6

Breaker is the wrong size The core problem is #14 wire on 20A breakers - you have to address that! Extending the circuit with #12 does not fix the problem! You must deal with the #14/20A problem. The only feasible answer is to replace the relevant 20A breaker(s) with 15A breaker(s). And this opens up another can of worms: All the breakers need to be ...


5

Four inch and six inch recessed fixtures consist of two main parts - the can and the trim. They need to match. The first issue will be getting the old can out. If it is old-work style, it may be held in just by pressure clips on the sides, fairly easy to remove. If it is new-work style, it will be attached to framing members, either directly or with a brace ...


5

I searched far and wide to find a solution for this for my own remodel. The orange connectors used by most of the lighting manufacturers is a standard IDEAL product - you can order them online in large quantity or on auction sites in smaller ones. You can retrofit the HALO cans to be compatible, or even use the connectors (as I did) to connect to GU10 ...


5

You can trim the rails so they will fit in a tighter space. Look close there are usually indents in the metal to help with cutting and snapping the rail to a shorter length. This is part of a normal install.


5

Scenario #4 I would just remove all the old drywall and use new construction fixtures. It may seem like a lot of work but all these other problems go away. Plus my "drywall guy" would throw a hissy fit trying to finish a layer over another layer with a texture. The drywall won't lay flat like it should and finishing will cost you more money or it won't look ...


5

Chances are that this fixture was installed at the time of the home's construction. It'll likely have two crossbars that were installed across the gap between the two adjacent roof trusses or floor joists: Removing it would require access above the ceiling, or you can attempt to cut and disassemble the unit through the hole in the ceiling. If you can ...


5

Almost all recessed light trim rings are held in place by spring clips that grip the interior of the recessed can. However, some of those clips have sharp prongs to better grip the can. You often have to use some force and wiggle the trim ring downward to overcome the grip. Sometimes, if you get a little gap, you can use a flat bladed tool, small putty ...


5

Use an old work box to house the splices There's a simple way out of this, and that's to use an old work box mounted into the ceiling drywall to house the electrical splices. A 3 gang switch box will do the trick, or you can use a 4 11/16" square box that's 1.5" or deeper if you can get an old work mountable version of that. (Really, anything that ...


5

Indirect lighting. example here Usually the light source is hidden by an archtectural feature, so the feature is constructed by normal building means and then the light source is hidden in it. At my house we have one strip light hidden in an open topped curtain pelmet and another hidden behind an one of the exposed rafters. These are 5' flourescent tubes ...


5

That whole plastic base pulls directly out. That is a compact fluorescent bulb, be careful not to breathe any powder/dust that comes out of the broken tube(s), not good for you.


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