20

Looks like a standard install. You can only run so many wires in a hole without de-rating the circuit capacity. The holes are set back at least 3/4" from the stud surface, add 1/2" for drywall and you get 1 1/4" the length of the drywall screws. Even if the drywall screw goes into the same line as the hole it isn't long enough to penetrate the wire. If ...


10

DIY option: rent a skid steer scrape off existing driveway buy crushed rock spread with skid steer, rake rent a compacter and compact crushed rock layer bring in sand, spread, screed and level. buy concrete pavers start laying them depending on your age/health, buy lots of Advil Good luck!


10

The post looks reasonably adequate as it was originally built even by modern standards. If it wasn't you'd have seen disaster long ago, when it first started to decay. To maintain the style detail I'd rebuild to match, using pressure-treated lumber. By doing so you eliminate the need to cut that notch and you end up with a more robust post. A single post ...


8

Check your unit's warranty. The heat exchangers on some units are warranteed for 20 years or longer. You may be able to get at least some money from the manufacturer, or a credit toward a new unit of the same brand. They may also cover all or part of the installation labor. Find out whether there are any federal or state tax incentives that could help. A ...


7

It looks like water stains. Take a screwdriver and press it into the surface especially in the groves. If the wood is rotten the screwdriver will dig in. If the wood is sound it will just leave a mark. This is how home inspectors test around suspected areas for rot.


6

First, figure out the replacement cost. Based on that, figure out what you're willing to spend on keeping the old one running. Never call a technician unless it's still under warranty. Parts + Labour for one call can be up to half the price of a new machine. (This is not a slight against the technicians. They're entitled to a fair wage, and your 1 hour ...


6

I think your contractor is right on the money, it's way easier to approach the problem from above than below, and trying to fix it from below would be very difficult to do properly. Floors generally creak because the floor material isn't strongly connected to the joists, to when you step the joists rub against the subflooring , and the subflooring segments ...


6

Can I use an old aluminum road sign as a replacement floor for my hot water heater closet? I'm sorry, but that made me laugh. First thing you should do, is find what is causing the floor to rot and fix the leak. What is "spongy"? The floor or the joist? If the joists are rotten, you need to replace them, then put a new floor down. After you fix the ...


6

Check all the supply valves to ensure they are open. It is not uncommon for old valves (particularly gate valves) to break whilst operating, leaving you with a low or no-flow situation (sometimes called a "dropped wedge"). This would require you to replace the suspect valve. If you did a DIY install, were any of the valves particularly corroded or hard to ...


5

That piece looks to just be a single curve (bent in a single axis), so it's possible to do yourself, but it's not necessarily the easiest thing to do, and you can get some optical distortion depending on how evenly you flex it. If I were to do it, I'd do the following: Trace the inside contour onto a piece of wood. Make multiple wood pieces, slightly under ...


5

Quick and dirty You could try some Fix-a-Flat. If nothing else, it might show you where the leak is. Finding the leak Pump the tires up and apply some soapy water to them, or hold them underwater in a large bucket. This will help you locate the leak(s). Plugging the hole If the leak is in the tread, you could try a tire repair kit like this If the ...


5

Modern electronic ballast technology (T8, T5) doesn't use starters. I associate starters with old, inefficient magnetic ballast installations. I haven't had to replace a starter in years because they have not been used in any of the newer buildings I've worked in. My preference would be to convert any T12 installation with magnetic ballast and starter to T8 ...


4

Get a drain key and a crescent wrench it will expand in the hole giving you friction to turn the drain out.


4

That unit is already 18 years old which means it's approaching its end of life. Even if you did repair the heat exchanger, you'd likely have to replace it soon anyways. With old stuff, it just always seems to be one thing after another. Assuming its not covered by warranty, then yes I think the contractors advice to replace it with a new unit is correct. ...


4

You're probably fine with the larger diameter (I wouldn't go smaller), but I would install a damper where you tie into the main trunk and then have someone come and rebalance the system using flow meters. That way a professional can optimize your entire house so that the air entering each room is the same relative to it's size and heat load, and the house ...


4

Pretty much anyone can demo a roof. Now it might take you a ton of time if you don't have the right tools but its not rocket science. There is a lot of trash so you need to get a dumpster. Laying new felt or paper is pretty easy too. But at the same time this isn't something you would get charged a ton of money for and if a crew was doing your roof ...


4

Yes, it's good possibility that if you don't purposefully depressurize the lines first, you will get spray. But this is easy to do. Turn off the hot water heater. If it's electric, there is usually an off position on the knob on the front, or turn it off at the breaker panel. If it's gas, just turn the knob to pilot. Turn off the cold water supply to the ...


4

The switch/outlet combo you have could physically work, but as pointed out by @Speedy Petey, it would not be code complaint since all outlets in bathrooms need to be GFCI. Consider replacing it with a GFCI/switch combo such as this. The wiring you have should work. One of the cables (which consists of one black and one white wire) is from the mains, and ...


4

Any common T12 bulb is what you need. You surely have the most common 4' T12 bi-pin type. They are everywhere. You have a wide choice of color temperature (4100k is standard fluorescent color, 5100k is more LED color, 2700K is incandescent color). And CRI (color rendering index), nobody will sell you less than 80 anymore, but you can get as high as 98....


4

If your doors are overlapping, you simply need another set of hinges with a larger overlay. The hinges in the link are 1/2" overlay and if that is what you are using there, you need to get a set of hinges with a 3/4" overlay. These are also known as "full overlay" hinges


3

In the UK there services popping up that offer profesional 3D printing For example 3D Print UK They offer help designing product and i think the max sizes are something like 2.5metres by 1metre. They charge £2 per square cm of material used. In order for it to diffuse light like you require you will need quite a thin print out (cheaper so that's good) ...


3

I think all of the comments are pretty spot on - unless a friend of yours has a large 3D printer, getting a single part made is going to be very expensive. Producing the part is actually not the expensive part, but building the molds used to produce the part can be VERY expensive. So expensive that often times a company might only have a single mold of any ...


3

There is a sub-panel between the bottom of the cabinet and the actual floor. Measure the board so you can create a new one (You can also get a piece of cardboard to create a template to cut from - works great with a cabinet with many angles.). To remove it (since it's particle board) you can just break it out with a hammer. **Be careful not to damage the ...


3

I don't know for sure what you mean by cross-bars, but bathtub drains are not usually removable (at least not w/o destroying the drain) from the end user side of the tub, and it's virtually IMPOSSIBLE to tighten the drain sufficiently from the "sit here" side of the tub if you were able to remove the old one. Have a look at this typical example of a tub ...


3

It depends if you want it to function or function and look good too. DAO1 had a good answer. I think you asked if hanging blinds is a DIY. On a scale of 1 to 100 hanging blinds is maybe a 10. Doing your driveway is maybe in the upper 80s. DAO1 gave you probably the easiest way to do it. Even doing it this way requires lots of man power, renting lots ...


3

For the mill work outside of the cabinetry, you have two practical options: Paint the trim. But note that oak has large pores, so you will see grain texture through the paint unless is was previously filled (which is unlikely). This is probably your least expensive option. Replace the trim. This won't be cheap. Trim is among the most expensive finishing ...


3

I can confirm that was indeed the part I needed. It was listed as: Vertical Blind Repair Carrier Stem and Gear for Attaching Slats


3

There are no structural issues with putting extra subfloor on existing subfloor. The only issue this would cause would be matching of the floor heights and possibly your first stair height. (and trim - subfloor could make you reinstall/cut all trim) (and make sure the old subfloor is even/flat or patch it first)


3

Yes - the rectangular hole on the right leads to a curved slot that holds the bolts used to secure your toilet. Your slot is broken which means the right side of the toilet will not be secure. This could (read will) lead to a rocking toilet (not in a good way) which will be followed by leaks (um, eww) and rotted subfloors or worse. A repair flange like ...


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