Hot answers tagged

18

I found the answer! @diceless set me on the right track in looking at where the foot of the bulb is connecting to the fixture. Since it was an older fixture (installed in the 80's, I think), the hot contact (Number 1 in this diagram ) was bent down, and it was connecting with the smaller bulb but not the bigger LED bulb. With the circuit turned off at the ...


13

We have had CFL's in a number of enclosed fixtures for years now. They generate comparable light for much less heat. The main thing you need to worry about with CFLs is, you can't use them on a dimmer unless that dimmer is designed for them. Other than that - less heat means even less risk of fire in my book.


12

The Feb. 2012 issue of Consumer Reports had a sidebar about new hybrid halogen/CFL light bulbs as part of a review of light bulbs. The sidebar includes a picture of a two-pack of GE Energy Smart 75W equivalent bulbs. These bulbs have a halogen bulb inside the CFL swirl. The theory is that the halogen is used when the light is first turned on, providing ...


11

No, the wattage is based on heat dissipation, so as long as the actual wattage of the bulb you are putting in is less, you're good to go.


11

Unfortunately that's the nature of flourescent lights. The TL;DR version is that the ballast in a flourescent light (that's the ballast in the fixture itself for tubes, and built into the bulb for CFLs) works by creating voltage spikes that get the arcing in the bulb going, to produce the light. Dimmable CFLs do this with a HUGE jolt to provide an "instant-...


11

It looks like CFL bulbs are difficult to dim. A dimmer typically reduces the effective voltage, which decreases current to the bulb. The science behind fluorescents just isn't meant to work that way, explained Paul McLellan with eLightBulbs, a division of Service Lighting, a Maple Grove, Minn., lighting supply company. It can cause dimmer ...


11

From the GE website: Compact fluorescent light bulbs may generally be used in enclosed fixtures as long as the enclosed fixture is not recessed. Totally enclosed recessed fixtures (for example, a ceiling can light with a cover over the bulb) create temperatures that are too high to allow the use of a compact fluorescent bulb.


10

As far as I know, the only risk at issue here is of overheating of the bulb. The heat comes from two sources: the output and waste heat of the bulb, and from resistive heating of the fixture wires and switch and socket contacts. CFL bulbs draw less current and produce less heat for a given light output; however, they are far less tolerant of high ...


8

Say your electrical bill is $100 a month. Now say you have a refrigerator, a computer, a window fan and your light bulbs in your house as your only electrical devices. Everything but your light bulbs are on 24/7. Fridge: 725W **NOTE MOST FRIDGES DON'T ACTUALLY RUN 24/7 THIS IS JUST FOR EXAMPLE PURPOSES* Computer : 125W Fan: 150W Lights (on 8 hours a day,...


8

Why your various meters don't do a good job measuring power being used by various devices is due to an AC Circuit phenomenon known as Power Factor. Power Factor The ratio of real power to apparent power. Real power is the work done, apparent power is the product of the current and voltage in the AC circuit. Capacitive and inductive loads cause a phase ...


8

This is normal for fluorescent bulbs. You should be able to see the same thing when you turn off the light fixture using a regular switch instead of dropping a tree across your power line. Fluorescent lights generate light by an electrical discharge through the mercury vapor in the tube; the mercury emits UV light, which excites electrons in the phosphorus ...


8

For a multi-bulb fixture the LED units do not want to be in the area where high heat is generated as would be the case with incandescent or especially with halogen bulbs. CFLs have their own special considerations if they are used in situations with special types of lamp dimmers. Such special dimmers may not be compatible with LED lighting modules. ...


7

Seems the issue is with Reliance testers: ElectricianTalk.com has this to say A while back I [posted] that I had bought a lot of cfl lamps. My electric bill did not seem to change all that much so I decided to test some of them. Here are some of the results. 15 watt cfl P=62watt 15 watt spot P=73 watts 13 watt mini spiral P=51 watts I ...


7

Yes, you're looking for lights with a high lumen output. Since LED/CFL bulbs don't convert heat to light, the wattage isn't directly proportional to the light output. As an extreme example, consider that a 2 watt laser is powerful enough to burn some materials, or blind you! What you'll likely find is that more expensive LED bulbs from lighting specialty ...


7

It's a CFL globe, but it's either a very old (early prototype) model that warms up slowly or it's simply worn out. Also, according to DoxyLover... ...the glow is starting at the ends of the fluorescent tubing (which are near the base). This causes the part of the tube near the top to cast a shadow on the globe. This is why [it may appear that] the ...


6

Everyone is saying, one way or another, that residential lighting is not a significant part of your electric bill. More efficient bulbs will eventually save you money, but depending on usage patterns and energy costs, this can take many years. If you want to see significant change in your electric bill, you need to address the major consumers of power. The ...


6

The CFL light bulbs tend to generate less heat; however, they are much more sensitive to heat. If the excess heat cannot escape in a timely manner, eventually the electronics within the light bulb will burn out, even though the fluorescent tube will be fine. Since these are not bulbs with replaceable ballasts or starters, effectively you'll have to throw ...


5

I don't know codes. But from the standpoint of dissipation of energy I can't imagine how putting something that dissipates less power as heat (most of a light bulb's power consumption ends up as heat) could be less safe than an equivalent wattage light bulb. That is, if you replace something that used to use 60W (mostly ending up as heat) with something that ...


5

Directly from Reliance Controls CFL and LED lighting have irregular current draws and in turn, irregular (non-linear) waveforms. These loads cannot be measured by this device accurately, sorry. Primarily the THP103 is intended for measuring medium-large sized loads to help facilitate load management in a backup generator/transfer switch ...


4

What matters is clearance and airflow around the ballast in the base of the CFL. CFL lamps that run in environments where airflow cannot take away the excess heat will suffer a much shorter lifespan. The higher the wattage, the more heat they will generate, though much reduced from what using an over-wattage incandescent (which can create a fire hazard) ...


4

new-work Halo cans are adjustable to accommodate different ceiling height. Remove the reflector trim and the lamp. Then remove the three sheet metal screws from near the bottom of the can. Slowly work the can down and out. There is enough slack in the jacketed cable to let the can hang about six inches below the ceiling. Reach through the hole and unclip ...


4

Approximately two years ago I had a CFL in a hanging bar fixture, open at the bottom. I'm not sure how long it was in there but, the CFL bulb exploded in the fixture. The part that exploded was between the base and the glass light part. It startled all of us, but thank goodness we didn't have to deal with mercury splattered everywhere and there was no fire....


4

You will be OK as far as not overloading electrically. You need to adhere to the most restrictive labeling, the 40wx3. Since you are using 27wx3, you are OK. The 75w limit is for the socket base only. It can handle 75w, but the rest of the fixture cannot. Be aware that 81 watts of fluorescent light is WAY more than the 120 watts of incandescent. If 120 watts ...


4

LEDs are better in almost every way other than price: LED Pros: Lower power consumption Longer bulb life, especially if the light is turned on and off frequently (which is hard on CFLs). Generally better color quality, although this varies from bulb to bulb for both LEDs and CFLs. CFLs usually have a CRI around 70-80, and LEDs are usually 80-90+. (See ...


3

I'm playing a bit fast and loose with the units here -- Watts are a measure of power, but the idea should be clear. Typically, you find these ratings on the socket where there is likely to be a shade in use. The smaller the lamp, the more likely you are to use a small shade, and the closer the shade will be to the actual bulb. The warning is there so you ...


3

Did you compare the watts used including ballast and what the dimmer is rated? Lutron's C.L dimmer advertises it will dim 600W incandescent but the CFL & LED's cannot be over 150W. This also lowers if multi-ganged or if fins are removed. Some other CFL dimmers show that you are only allowed X number of lamps. Your 5 x 60W sounds like you should be ...


3

You have a number of issues affecting the poor lighting in the mirror. When light hits you when facing the mirror it's reflected light coming off the ceilings, walls and other items in the room. The intensity of light falls off exponentially following the inverse square rule. When you double the distance the intensity of light is 1/4th. Triple the distance ...


3

Minimum Code Requirement and the Problem with Uneven Lighting It seems like you're trying to correct for what is likely minimum code requirement wiring. Usually that means a single electrical box for a light fixture in the middle of a room, or a switched outlet ostensibly for floor lamps. The problem with this minimal number of fixtures is twofold: As ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible