Hot answers tagged

27

I found the answer! @diceless set me on the right track in looking at where the foot of the bulb is connecting to the fixture. Since it was an older fixture (installed in the 80's, I think), the hot contact (Number 1 in this diagram ) was bent down, and it was connecting with the smaller bulb but not the bigger LED bulb. With the circuit turned off at the ...


8

I had the same problem with LED bulbs not working in a socket that an incandescent bulb worked. After making sure that the the circuit breaker was off, or the lamp was unplugged, I inserted a pair of thin pliers into the socket and pulled the bottom contact a little. After that, an LED bulb worked fine.


8

For a multi-bulb fixture the LED units do not want to be in the area where high heat is generated as would be the case with incandescent or especially with halogen bulbs. CFLs have their own special considerations if they are used in situations with special types of lamp dimmers. Such special dimmers may not be compatible with LED lighting modules. ...


8

Say your electrical bill is $100 a month. Now say you have a refrigerator, a computer, a window fan and your light bulbs in your house as your only electrical devices. Everything but your light bulbs are on 24/7. Fridge: 725W **NOTE MOST FRIDGES DON'T ACTUALLY RUN 24/7 THIS IS JUST FOR EXAMPLE PURPOSES* Computer : 125W Fan: 150W Lights (on 8 hours a day,...


8

Why your various meters don't do a good job measuring power being used by various devices is due to an AC Circuit phenomenon known as Power Factor. Power Factor The ratio of real power to apparent power. Real power is the work done, apparent power is the product of the current and voltage in the AC circuit. Capacitive and inductive loads cause a phase ...


7

Seems the issue is with Reliance testers: ElectricianTalk.com has this to say A while back I [posted] that I had bought a lot of cfl lamps. My electric bill did not seem to change all that much so I decided to test some of them. Here are some of the results. 15 watt cfl P=62watt 15 watt spot P=73 watts 13 watt mini spiral P=51 watts I ...


7

Yes, you're looking for lights with a high lumen output. Since LED/CFL bulbs don't convert heat to light, the wattage isn't directly proportional to the light output. As an extreme example, consider that a 2 watt laser is powerful enough to burn some materials, or blind you! What you'll likely find is that more expensive LED bulbs from lighting specialty ...


7

It's a CFL globe, but it's either a very old (early prototype) model that warms up slowly or it's simply worn out. Also, according to DoxyLover... ...the glow is starting at the ends of the fluorescent tubing (which are near the base). This causes the part of the tube near the top to cast a shadow on the globe. This is why [it may appear that] the ...


6

Everyone is saying, one way or another, that residential lighting is not a significant part of your electric bill. More efficient bulbs will eventually save you money, but depending on usage patterns and energy costs, this can take many years. If you want to see significant change in your electric bill, you need to address the major consumers of power. The ...


5

Directly from Reliance Controls CFL and LED lighting have irregular current draws and in turn, irregular (non-linear) waveforms. These loads cannot be measured by this device accurately, sorry. Primarily the THP103 is intended for measuring medium-large sized loads to help facilitate load management in a backup generator/transfer switch ...


5

Many times I have found the center conductor in the light socket has flattened out, lifting that tab away from the base with the power off will usually solve the problem. I have found some “electronic” lamps (not incandescent) do not have threads that are as long or a shoulder stops the lamp from being screwed in far enough. Lifting the tab will fix this ...


4

new-work Halo cans are adjustable to accommodate different ceiling height. Remove the reflector trim and the lamp. Then remove the three sheet metal screws from near the bottom of the can. Slowly work the can down and out. There is enough slack in the jacketed cable to let the can hang about six inches below the ceiling. Reach through the hole and unclip ...


4

Approximately two years ago I had a CFL in a hanging bar fixture, open at the bottom. I'm not sure how long it was in there but, the CFL bulb exploded in the fixture. The part that exploded was between the base and the glass light part. It startled all of us, but thank goodness we didn't have to deal with mercury splattered everywhere and there was no fire....


4

You will be OK as far as not overloading electrically. You need to adhere to the most restrictive labeling, the 40wx3. Since you are using 27wx3, you are OK. The 75w limit is for the socket base only. It can handle 75w, but the rest of the fixture cannot. Be aware that 81 watts of fluorescent light is WAY more than the 120 watts of incandescent. If 120 watts ...


4

LEDs are better in almost every way other than price: LED Pros: Lower power consumption Longer bulb life, especially if the light is turned on and off frequently (which is hard on CFLs). Generally better color quality, although this varies from bulb to bulb for both LEDs and CFLs. CFLs usually have a CRI around 70-80, and LEDs are usually 80-90+. (See ...


3

It's impossible to say for sure without inspecting the lamp, but it sounds like a bad CFL. Have you already checked to be sure that the bulb is screwed in securely? You could use a multimeter to check for continuity through all of the wires to the socket (which can be difficult when trying to find an intermittent connection since digital multimeters ...


3

Minimum Code Requirement and the Problem with Uneven Lighting It seems like you're trying to correct for what is likely minimum code requirement wiring. Usually that means a single electrical box for a light fixture in the middle of a room, or a switched outlet ostensibly for floor lamps. The problem with this minimal number of fixtures is twofold: As you ...


3

You have a number of issues affecting the poor lighting in the mirror. When light hits you when facing the mirror it's reflected light coming off the ceilings, walls and other items in the room. The intensity of light falls off exponentially following the inverse square rule. When you double the distance the intensity of light is 1/4th. Triple the distance ...


3

I've had this problem several times and the way to remove the bulb is simple. The recessed light fixture can be removed from the ceiling if while you gently pull on the outer edge of the fixture and press the clips in that you see in picture #2. You may have to pull and press alternating sides. There should be enough cable to allow the removal of the entire ...


3

The 2 holes touching, that look like a figure-8, on the side with the writing... are stab connections. You just stick a right-sized wire in the hole. The right size is typically 18 AWG solid or tinned. Hot and neutral don't apply here. These wires need to come off the fluorescent ballast and must be wired according to the ballast diagram.


2

I don't think anyone is advertising that switching out a single bulb will save you loads of money, but when you consider the savings across your entire house, it does start to add up. Even if there was a $0.50 savings per bulb per month (on average), my house probably has 60 bulbs, so that's $30 a month or $360 a year. Regarding LED's, the incremental ...


2

I've noted that CFLs used in fixtures with closed tops and sides (even if the bottom is open) have very short lifespans. 6 months to a year is all I've seen out of those. Open top fixtures (even with closed sides and bottom), haven't had to replace any of those despite running them for years. Heat appears to be a major problem in lifespan. I've not heard ...


2

If power costs you 11.4 cents per kwh (and that's pretty close for a lot of people), then your annual cost for power is easy to figure: a dollar a watt. Per year. Then divide by the fraction time that it's on, e.g. that 100W dusk-to-dawn barn light is on half the time, so $50 a year. Easy peasy. You go from a 100W incandescent to a 14W LED, that's $86 ...


2

Any leakage current will cause CFLs to flash. I had to replace my porch light timer with a relay type because the sensor in my original one used a very slight amount of current to test if the bulbs were installed and working. And here's a similar problem I have been having, for which I have not yet found a suitable solution: I have some LED spotlights on a ...


2

@mbeckish is correct on making sure these are all dimmable CFLs. If they are all dimmable, then you've found one of the issues with leading edge cut R and RL dimmers. The rise time is so sharp that it causes issues in the electronics, usually the dimmer is what buzzes. Adding some resistance (an incandescent bulb) to the circuit will slow the voltage ...


2

If it is just the glare or light color of the incandescent bulbs that you do not like, consider 40 watt equivalent candelabra CFLs like these If you need higher wattage, there are 60 watt equivalent versions, but I have not seen them with the bullet shape of most conventional candelabra bulbs. A broader CFL bulb may fit, but you need to check for clearance ...


2

It could be that the tab at the center of one of the light sockets is not making adequate contact and this is producing an arc between the tab and the bulb. Overheating and premature failure might result. Try bending the tab out toward the bulb and screw the bulb back in so proper contact is made.


2

Do you have a picture of the cover? It seems very likely that all your problem simply relate to an overheating. Is there a chance for a better air flow (thermal ventilation)?


2

A compact florescent (CFL) definitely heats up and needs to have room to dissipate that heat. It is not nearly as hot (25–33%) as an equivalently bright incandescent, but the radiation pattern is different too. An incandescent has most of its heat coming out the bulb with only a small proportion from near the narrow base. A CFL has electronics in ...


2

This is G24Q, a dedicated FL mount. It means it's wired to a FL ballast and starter, has a reflector to catch omnidirectional emission pattern of a FL - basically all the infrastructure to run a FL. While it is technically possible to build a LED that can work simulating a FL, it's counter-productive. If you want to have a LED light, then do it right all ...


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