Hot answers tagged

80

That type of connector is commonly used as a socket for a temperature probe that can be inserted into the food (usually meat) to measure its internal temperature instead of the air temperature in the oven. I imagine the labeling “MT” you saw probably stands for “meat thermometer”.


57

It's much more difficult for a small child to "play with the controls" and turn the stove elements on in that location. Having lived with stoves like this for a long time, I've never burned myself reaching for them.


43

Temperature probe connection, indeed. Go look up the manual for your oven, or look around the junk drawer in your kitchen for the matching temperature probe.


14

Um...in a word...ABSOLUTELY NOT!! You should without a doubt get the proper replacement insulation and put it back same as it came from the factory.


13

What is happening is called product of combustion. Somewhere around in the house or near the house someone used or opened some sort of stain, paint, varnish or comparable compound including cleaners. The molecules carry over and get mixed in with air and then burned off from open flame. If you light a candle or a lighter you will smell the same odor, ...


11

It’s an old or perhaps a better word is classic design - there are some advantages like if you spill something it won’t go all over the controls. However disadvantages include having to reach over a spitting or steaming pan but it is always down to what you learned on or are used to.


10

In addition to the useful comments already posted, the design prevents accidental turn ons due to leaning up against the stove to stir a pot, etc.


9

Assuming you have the split-phase power supply that is normal for residential settings in the United States, you should use the line item for 120/240V. The 120/208V line is for 3-phase supplies, which you typically find in commercial or industrial settings (each leg of a 3-phase supply is 120V relative to the neutral, and is at a 120° phase difference ...


9

It looks like an NF C 61-315 standard French single phase plug: These are are rated for 400V, 32A on a single phase. The socket you have pictured looks like a French style Schuko (CEE 7/3), which is typically only rated to around 16A. My guess is that unless you already have a socket that was intended for use with an electric stove, the wires are likely not ...


9

Your heating elements are wired in series because it takes two elements to match the voltage of your electricity supply. because they are in series the dead element has disabled its partner. There's no cheap solution.


6

Stop and get things checked out!!! The breaker is there as a safety protection device - not as a minor inconvenience. If the breaker is tripping there is an overload or short circuit some place that needs to be addressed. Electrical safety issues are nothing to mess around with. You could get severely shocked or killed as a result of an electrical fault. ...


6

Simple. Replace the breaker for that oven with a 20A version since that's what the instructions call for. You're lucky that the wire is almost certainly large enough for 20A. Going down in breaker size is FINE. Going up rarely is.


6

You need a 12/3+ground cable as a minimum to support this oven. However it would be a nice future-proofing trick to run 10/3+ground. You can also run individual wires in conduit if you prefer, for the ultimate future-proofing. I would run 3/4" conduit, or 1" if able, as that will support any foreseeable future oven/range. You must run neutral and ground ...


6

Yes it is a leak, a slow leak but a leak nonetheless and it does need to be addressed. Any leak no matter how small is potentially dangerous. You should turn the valve off And address the problem. Some jurisdictions require that all gas connections be handled by a licensed contractor but if you are allowed then you could turn the gas off, use two ...


5

It is possible that much of the dark brown staining is grease that has accumulated from the stove, oven and broiler which has darkened with heat. However, the device that is bundling the wires near the top definitely looks as if it has been degraded by heat. Also, if enough grease accumulates and it is overheated, the grease itself can become a fire hazard. ...


5

Yes, by all means - larger than minimum wire is perfectly fine.


5

See table 220.55 in the NEC, as well as footnote 4 to that table: Branch-Circuit Load. It shall be permissible to calculate the branch-circuit load for one range in accordance with Table 220.55. The branch- circuit load for one wall-mounted oven or one counter-mounted cooking unit shall be the nameplate rating of the appliance. The branch-circuit ...


5

You may have a lost pole/phase or neutral. That is very serious problem but the good news is that in most places you can call your electric utility and they will check and likely fix it as most of the time this is a utility problem and not a problem in your house. Key clue is a 240v load making 120v loads work. CALL YOUR ELECTRIC UTILITY AND TELL THEM YOU ...


5

Aside from the major parental control feature, already mentioned, this allows the oven door to extend all the way up, granting a more spacious oven chamber opening for inserting taller things if needed. Probably too minor to make enough of a difference to most, but sure does look more "dedicated" and potentially a selling feature to some.


5

Could be a cracked ignitor element, letting through enough current to open the gas valve until it gets even hotter, then the crack widens and the gas valve closes. Could be a faulty valve, and the valve throat is blocked by debris or broken part (as opposed to valve coil is broken). You can distinguish between those cases by reading the voltage across ...


5

This may be a device fault (loose wires, failing control panel, etc.) but it may be an actual power problem. In the olden days, a short power outage - even a minute or two - made little difference to anything. Your AC-line powered clocks (whether in an oven or on the wall) would be a minute off and everything else would be "as it was before". Now ...


5

That is a very common fault for a heating element. Check and see if the stove top works, the fault may not have tripped the breaker. Most older homes have a 40 amp circuit double pole for a range and 50 amp is becoming more popular. (If in another part of the world a different size breaker is possible) A 120v oven doubtful 120v GFCI very doubtful with older ...


4

The problem could be either the oven or the wiring. The oven could be using more amperage than the circuit breaker is rated for, and thus tripping the breaker. Or, the problem could be with the wiring (for example, damaged insulation causing unwanted current in the wire), or the circuit breaker could be failing. Standard circuit breakers are designed with a ...


4

Final resolution: Father in law came over and we did all the measurements above, starting from the oven outward. As it turns out, we could have saved time by starting at the panel first. However. At the panel, the oven and the air conditioning unit are both being run off of aluminum wiring instead of copper. As was explained to me, the disadvantage is that ...


4

According to the NEC, any household cooking appliance rated at 12kW or less can be served by a 40A circuit. Yours is over this so bumping up to a 50A would be required. The code on this can be confusing, but trust me, it's there. I am interested in where it says a 40A circuit is acceptable.


4

It's referring to the electrical service supplying the house. Most homes in the US are supplied by a single phase service, which is often described as a 120/240 Volt system. If your house is supplied by a three phase system, it could be a 120/208 Volt system. In both these cases you'll be able to install the equipment you have. NEMA 14 devices are four ...


4

I did the same thing but with PB Blaster (it smells even worse than WD-40) for an outdoor kitchen. I just wiped it down with soapy water and ran the oven at 425 with the door open for about 10 minutes before putting any food in it. There really wasn't any smell or smoke because the petroleum distillates burn off very fast.


4

I wouldn't expect it to be anything more than a resistive element so it shouldn't be polarized... but the maintenance manual is almost certainly available on the weB, free or for a small fee, so I'd suggest you check that.


4

Great questions can always be asked with only a few words. But my answers never seem short. The short answer is that the stove can not breathe. Give it more air. Problem Fixed. What is happening, the chemistry answer: Carbon Monoxide is made when too much natural gas is burning in too little oxygen. Good -> Natural Gas + Lots of Oxygen + Spark = Carbon ...


4

You'll need: NEMA 14-50 receptacle. 40 ampere double pole breaker Four 8 AWG copper conductors, or four 6 AWG aluminum conductors (Hot, Hot, Neutral, Ground). It's common for builders to use a 50 ampere breaker and larger conductors, to make sure the circuit can handle any range the owner's might use. But if you're installing the circuit to support a ...


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