Hot answers tagged

21

Gotta tell you, I tried the same thing long ago. Learn from my stupidity. LOL Seems that regular bulbs really don't like the high heat or getting splattered with cooking juices, shatter at the first contact with liquid. Think you better spend the couple of extra $$$ and not have to clean up a shattered glass mess in your oven.


17

That is correct. See NEMA 14-50R Source G - Ground W - Neutral X - Hot Y - Hot If you look at the terminal screws on one of these receptacles, you may notice they are different colors. The green tinted screw is ground. The silver screw is neutral. The two brass screws are hot. This is a common pattern in most electrical devices, and can easily be ...


15

What you are looking for is a 40A15 Appliance Rated Lamp. If you can find 130V buy it, but the lamp does not stay on long enough to really matter. Believe or not it's the same as what is in your refrigerator. I did a quick search and this is what the Home Depot says (I don't work for them, actually they are the competition, kind of): The GE ...


14

Um...in a word...ABSOLUTELY NOT!! You should without a doubt get the proper replacement insulation and put it back same as it came from the factory.


10

What is happening is called product of combustion. Somewhere around in the house or near the house someone used or opened some sort of stain, paint, varnish or comparable compound including cleaners. The molecules carry over and get mixed in with air and then burned off from open flame. If you light a candle or a lighter you will smell the same odor, ...


9

Assuming you have the split-phase power supply that is normal for residential settings in the United States, you should use the line item for 120/240V. The 120/208V line is for 3-phase supplies, which you typically find in commercial or industrial settings (each leg of a 3-phase supply is 120V relative to the neutral, and is at a 120° phase difference ...


8

It looks like an NF C 61-315 standard French single phase plug: These are are rated for 400V, 32A on a single phase. The socket you have pictured looks like a French style Schuko (CEE 7/3), which is typically only rated to around 16A. My guess is that unless you already have a socket that was intended for use with an electric stove, the wires are likely not ...


7

In most cases when you purchase a free-standing electric range, you'll be required to purchase the appliance cord separately. The sales person should ask if you need a 3 or 4 prong cord, at the time of purchase. NEC Article 250.140 Frames of Ranges and Clothes Dryers. requires 4 prong receptacles and appliance cords to be used in new installations, but ...


6

The obvious (but ultimately unhelpful) answer is that the heat/smoke from your cooking is setting off the alarm. So what you have to do is reduce the heat/smoke getting to the alarm. There are a number of things you can do: If you don't have a smoke alarm in the kitchen close the door while cooking. This will stop the fumes reaching the detector. Use the ...


6

Stop and get things checked out!!! The breaker is there as a safety protection device - not as a minor inconvenience. If the breaker is tripping there is an overload or short circuit some place that needs to be addressed. Electrical safety issues are nothing to mess around with. You could get severely shocked or killed as a result of an electrical fault. ...


6

Simple. Replace the breaker for that oven with a 20A version since that's what the instructions call for. You're lucky that the wire is almost certainly large enough for 20A. Going down in breaker size is FINE. Going up rarely is.


5

First I would check the circuit breaker, flip it off and back on then re check oven. If it does not work think about what you have done since last you used it, are you sure the door is latching closed and the controlls are on the right position? If you know someone who has lived in the area for a long time ask them if they know who to call. An electrican ...


5

Why did they turn off the gas? To do some work? If that is the case then there is probably air in the line. The pilot orifice is small compared to the burners which means it will take longer for the air to "bleed out". Alternatively, there may be a button somewhere that you have to hold down (to get the gas flowing to the pilots) in order to light the ...


5

It is possible that much of the dark brown staining is grease that has accumulated from the stove, oven and broiler which has darkened with heat. However, the device that is bundling the wires near the top definitely looks as if it has been degraded by heat. Also, if enough grease accumulates and it is overheated, the grease itself can become a fire hazard. ...


5

Yes, by all means - larger than minimum wire is perfectly fine.


5

See table 220.55 in the NEC, as well as footnote 4 to that table: Branch-Circuit Load. It shall be permissible to calculate the branch-circuit load for one range in accordance with Table 220.55. The branch- circuit load for one wall-mounted oven or one counter-mounted cooking unit shall be the nameplate rating of the appliance. The branch-circuit ...


5

As far as 40 vs. 50 - that depends on the manufacturer's requirements. The installation instructions clearly state: A 50 Amp circuit breaker with wire gauge #8 AWG must be used. So there you have it. 50 Amp - not 40 Amp. 8 AWG - not smaller. You can, of course, use larger wire - e.g., 6 AWG - that is always OK. But you can't use a smaller breaker - my ...


4

The thermocouple insures that the flame is on, it's used to shut the gas off if the flame goes out. Your problem sounds more like a thermostat. The thermostat measures the temperature of the oven, and is used to determine when to turn the flame on and off. Check the manufactures documentation for thermostat troubleshooting and replacement information. ...


4

If the stove top is working you are getting power.The person you want to call is a large appliance repair shop.They will be able to diagnose the problem, give you an estimate and hopefully give you an honest opinion if the repair is worth it.


4

There is more than one type of smoke detector / fire alarm, so it's really hard to say without knowing what you have. Photo : have a light source + detector, and go off if they sense particles in the air. They typically require a bit of smoke or dust to set them off, but a cracked casing can also do it (as it lets light into the detector). Ionizing : (most ...


4

Considering the kinds of caustic chemicals in commercial oven cleaners (lye, KOH), I would have no fear of using dish soap. Theoretically soap bubbles can trap flammable gas, so it's good that you rinsed thoroughly, but it's certainly less dangerous than a pool of grease. My experience has been that vinegar and baking soda are fairly effective for cleaning ...


4

(based on comments) The opening is called a Primary Air Mixture. Gas flowing through the line from the service point passes this opening, picks up air (oxygen), mixes and is ignited at the burner head. Pressure in the line keeps the gas flowing. As there should not be air (oxygen) in the gas lines, this port allows the proper amount of oxygen to mix into ...


4

The problem could be either the oven or the wiring. The oven could be using more amperage than the circuit breaker is rated for, and thus tripping the breaker. Or, the problem could be with the wiring (for example, damaged insulation causing unwanted current in the wire), or the circuit breaker could be failing. Standard circuit breakers are designed with a ...


4

Final resolution: Father in law came over and we did all the measurements above, starting from the oven outward. As it turns out, we could have saved time by starting at the panel first. However. At the panel, the oven and the air conditioning unit are both being run off of aluminum wiring instead of copper. As was explained to me, the disadvantage is that ...


4

According to the NEC, any household cooking appliance rated at 12kW or less can be served by a 40A circuit. Yours is over this so bumping up to a 50A would be required. The code on this can be confusing, but trust me, it's there. I am interested in where it says a 40A circuit is acceptable.


4

It's referring to the electrical service supplying the house. Most homes in the US are supplied by a single phase service, which is often described as a 120/240 Volt system. If your house is supplied by a three phase system, it could be a 120/208 Volt system. In both these cases you'll be able to install the equipment you have. NEMA 14 devices are four ...


4

I did the same thing but with PB Blaster (it smells even worse than WD-40) for an outdoor kitchen. I just wiped it down with soapy water and ran the oven at 425 with the door open for about 10 minutes before putting any food in it. There really wasn't any smell or smoke because the petroleum distillates burn off very fast.


4

I wouldn't expect it to be anything more than a resistive element so it shouldn't be polarized... but the maintenance manual is almost certainly available on the weB, free or for a small fee, so I'd suggest you check that.


4

Great questions can always be asked with only a few words. But my answers never seem short. The short answer is that the stove can not breathe. Give it more air. Problem Fixed. What is happening, the chemistry answer: Carbon Monoxide is made when too much natural gas is burning in too little oxygen. Good -> Natural Gas + Lots of Oxygen + Spark = Carbon ...


4

You'll need: NEMA 14-50 receptacle. 40 ampere double pole breaker Four 8 AWG copper conductors, or four 6 AWG aluminum conductors (Hot, Hot, Neutral, Ground). It's common for builders to use a 50 ampere breaker and larger conductors, to make sure the circuit can handle any range the owner's might use. But if you're installing the circuit to support a ...


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