The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Hot answers tagged

81

Conveniently, it still had the UPC barcode label and you captured it quite clearly in the picture. A search at upcdatabase.com shows that it is: Description Brinks Home Security System AC Power Adaptor Size/Weight 5x3x3, 12 ounces Issuing Country United States A Google Search for that UPC brings up a number of hits, including on at Parts Express ...


21

Let me introduce you to the wonderful world of Google Image search: nema 5-15 dimensions It's a great way to find drawings and other visual information. Here's a drawing pulled from the search results: Powercord CN Dimiensions are millimeters with a comma used instead of a decimal point. NEMA Website Following some image searches and regular searches ...


13

You need two things.... 1/4" drive 7/16" socket ...and a 1/4" hex shank socket adapter... That adapter kit will allow you to use multiple drives of sockets for hundreds of future uses. You probably already have some sockets. There are some one piece cheapos on the market that do work, but you have to buy all new kits when either the shank or socket portion ...


12

What you bought was a hex bit socket, not a simple hex socket. What's confusing you here is the bit coming out of the top of the socket. You've confused that for a drill shank. The square portion is where you would attach a 1/2" ratchet (or drill socket adapter, like Jerry described in his answer). Harbor Freight describes their hex bit set like this ...


7

If it's a 4-prong receptacle, then you could do it. Though you'll have to swap out a breaker in the panel. This will leave you with a 20 ampere multi-wire branch circuit (MWBC), which can be used to supply countertop receptacles. If it's a 3-prong receptacle, there's likely not a grounding conductor. So it's not going to be a good idea, though there are ...


6

IF you have a "4-Prong" (Hot, Hot, Neutral, Ground) dryer outlet you could make (or perhaps "have made" would be safer depending on your skill level) a "plug-in sub-panel" that would take the (probably 30amp) 240V via a dryer plug, and divide it into two or four 15 or 20A GFCI-protected (GFCI and 20A is required for kitchen outlets) 120V outlets. This ...


6

You're comparing apples to oranges. You're using the power output, to try and determine the input. Without knowing about the transformer, and other circuitry, that's going to be quite difficult. According to the specification listed by the manufacturer The unit will draw about 1.4 amperes at 100-240 volts AC (VAC), which I'm assuming is the value when ...


6

I believe you're looking for an allen head ratchet set, like the one below. A trip to your local hardware or home improvement store might be in order so you can see some products to get a sense of whether or not they can fit in the small space you have before you make a purchase. (http://chapmanmfg.com/ , also available on Amazon) I've never used this ...


6

Cat7 connectors are compatible with Cat5, with enhancements and caveats Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6 and Cat7 are physically and electrically compatible. It's when you try to do 10Gb/s or higher signaling on the cable that the Cat5e standard falls over. The physical connectors for Cat6 and Cat7 cables are still RJ45 plugs, but they're shielded and the standard calls ...


6

You need to connect to the center two wires in RJ-11. Since RJ-11 is usually 6 pins, these are pins 3 and 4. If yours has only 4 pins, these should be pins 2 and 3. Leave the other pins unconnected. Now, with regards to the colors (and correct polarity), this is country-dependent. Check this chart for reference. But, you can also try one way, and if it ...


5

Hex shank to square drive adapter This bit is a hex shank to square drive adapter, which allows you to use square drive bits with a drill/driver. Hex shank socket The second set of tools is hard to tell for sure what it is. If the sliver bit at the bottom has a hexagonal cutout in it, then they are hex shank sockets. If that's what they are, they allow ...


5

Google really did not want to help, because any such queries were glutted by travel adapters with all the different socket codes (A through J). Americans may note those cover only US NEMA 1 and 5, and don't cover NEMA 7, 15, L5, 23 and many others intended for heavy-duty use. That is the situation here. This socket is for heavy-duty loads. It is not ...


4

In this picture: The top bit is for driving sockets with, for example, a power drill. The bottom bits are for turning allen screws with a socket wrench. Such as this:


4

It all depends on how much you are willing to learn. If you are confident in your ability to do it safely, go for it. If not, do more research until you are or hire an electrician. Personally I am confident doing anything up to replacing a main electrical panel. That is something I would have to hire an electrician for, even though I could in theory do it, ...


4

Yes flipping the switch will turn the power off. You will still want to double check at the outlet with a voltage tester. The objects to the left are fuses and are color coded to the amperage which you can also see embossed on the front (red is 30 amps; blue is 15 amps and I can't read the white one). If one blows then you will probably want to replace the ...


4

IMHO this is a somewhat low-quality answer just a cut above link-only (which is why it was posted as a comment), and based entirely on "choose the right keywords for a search about an item I know nothing about directly." But since at least two people have requested it as an answer, here it is. I encourage anyone who actually has direct experience of these or ...


4

Qualifier: I live in Japan and have seen tons of those sockets. The majority of Japanese rental apartments do not have ceiling fixtures - tenants bring their own. What you have there is a standard twist-lock ceiling socket. It is designed to hold up lightweight fixtures all by itself, heavier ones hang from the nearby hook. The somewhat rusty grill beside ...


4

The socket spring is sprung. The buzzing says you have arcing in there. Very bad news. I suspect the wire is getting loose because it's a type of connection we call a "back stab" where you jab the wire in a hole and a barbed spring grabs it, I bet that has also sprung. I would shut off the breaker and swap the outlets for quality grades. How do you ...


4

Yes - almost certainly. You need to get the wiring right (the wires should be colour coded in the usual way - if in doubt post pictures). The pins are in the same positions in both plugs. The 13A plug is fixed unlike the 5A. A fuse should be chosen to match the rating of the cord but you're unlikely to have that information. In that case just fit a 1A fuse ...


4

the "electric noises" is very likely arcing. If the other one works normally then the fix is to replace the entire outlet (the face plate is just a cosmetic cover).


4

These are a type of splice that in your case was a safe way to terminate the wire in the bottom photo. In my area they are referred by there brand name Wago. I only use these types of splices or connectors in fluorescent fixtures but they are or can be used as they are a listed connector. Some contractors use them because they are quick to install and take ...


4

The terminals on the back side of that speaker connection adapter are meant to be used with a type of crimp on terminal such as those pictured below: (Picture source - https://www.arc-components.com/2-001-34-pack-of-100-durite-coloured-crimp-terminal-480mm-push-on-red.html) These come in various sizes, colors and styles. Some types are covered with ...


4

In an improperly wired electrical outlet, yes this might help (depending on the configuration). But you should not connect ground to neutral. Neutral is for carrying return currents and can develop a voltage on it, it should not be shorted to ground. If you do short it to ground, you have a potential for a safety hazard as the chassis of the device your ...


3

This is a transformer or DC power supply. Odds are that this was installed years ago by the telephone company to power land-line telephones with light-up dials ("princess" phones). This was well before LED lighting that pulled small-enough power to run right off of the power from the central office.


3

A transformer to reduce the house current to low voltage, to power something. It can be for any number of things. If it goes into the wall, check the other side, there is a chance the wire comes straight through.


3

Hot1 and Neutral1 are the feed from the panel. Hot2 and Neutral2 feed the next receptacle in the chain. If you connect Hot1 and Neutral1 to the receptacle, this receptacle will work. If you also connect Hot2 and Neutral2 to the receptacle, all the devices downstream will also work. Depending on the new receptacle you're installing, you should wire it ...


3

I have recently moved from India to the UK and carried a Philips air fryer with me. The plug on this appliance is marked 16A 250V. Wattage is 1425. The marking on the plug is the current rating for the plug, not the current the appliance will draw. 1425W is just under 6A so it should be fine to use the appliance on a 13A UK socket. Sometimes you do find ...


3

The pairs of holes labelled "L" and "N" probably contain "stab" or push-fit connectors. Try pushing a stripped wire into one of each and test.


3

To me (from NL) this looks perfectly normal, two four-way push terminals to connect the lives and neutrals and a two-way-push to two-way-clamp connector for ground. These things are touch save, so by leaving it like this you can turn on the breaker and still be safe. And I'd consider a "normal screw terminal socket" anything but normal or modern, every ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible