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82

Conveniently, it still had the UPC barcode label and you captured it quite clearly in the picture. A search at upcdatabase.com shows that it is: Description Brinks Home Security System AC Power Adaptor Size/Weight 5x3x3, 12 ounces Issuing Country United States A Google Search for that UPC brings up a number of hits, including on at Parts Express ...


27

Grounding is no longer red-alert essential Since there are other ways now to provide better protection. Particularly, GFCI protection is so good that you're allowed to fit 3-prong outlets as long as they are protected by a GFCI device (somewhere in the circuit). So all these are acceptable: A socket that's obviously a GFCI, with "Test" and "...


22

Let me introduce you to the wonderful world of Google Image search: nema 5-15 dimensions It's a great way to find drawings and other visual information. Here's a drawing pulled from the search results: Powercord CN Dimiensions are millimeters with a comma used instead of a decimal point. NEMA Website Following some image searches and regular searches ...


16

Here is what the process of pulling the cover down will look like. The bulb is inside. If you can't get your fingers around it to unscrew it and need to use the suction cup, you can squeeze the spring clips and remove the entire trim ring assembly. Pay attention to how it came out, you'll need to reverse that process to get it back in.


15

There are a few possibilities: The bathroom outlets were changed to three-prong and the ground screws are unattached. This means they're not grounded and are potentially unsafe. New wiring (or retrofit grounds) were run to the bathroom. This means they're grounded and relatively safe (they should still be GFCI protected). The outlets in the bathroom have &...


13

You need two things.... 1/4" drive 7/16" socket ...and a 1/4" hex shank socket adapter... That adapter kit will allow you to use multiple drives of sockets for hundreds of future uses. You probably already have some sockets. There are some one piece cheapos on the market that do work, but you have to buy all new kits when either the shank or socket portion ...


12

What you bought was a hex bit socket, not a simple hex socket. What's confusing you here is the bit coming out of the top of the socket. You've confused that for a drill shank. The square portion is where you would attach a 1/2" ratchet (or drill socket adapter, like Jerry described in his answer). Harbor Freight describes their hex bit set like this ...


11

Cat7 connectors are compatible with Cat5, with enhancements and caveats Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6 and Cat7 are physically and electrically compatible. It's when you try to do 10Gb/s or higher signaling on the cable that the Cat5e standard falls over. Even at that, though, Cat5e will do 10Gbps out to 150 feet. The physical connectors for Cat6 and Cat7 cables are ...


11

Try grabbing the trim ring underneath the edges and pulling straight down. They usually have a springy bracket that holds them in place. Once down, the bulb will be exposed.


11

You're not blowing fuses/tripping breakers because each appliance draws a maximum of 10A (I think that's what you're saying). However, they don't always draw 10A - they usually only draw that much power at startup* - i.e. when the dryer motor starts spinning it may take up to 10A to get it moving, but once moving, it doesn't draw nearly that much to keep ...


10

There are 2 issues here. First, most socket splitters are cheap. They are made for cell phones, not washer-dryers. And so they tend to burn up even if you use them within their spec, because most of them are complete rubbish - watch "BigClivedotcom" and other teardown videos on Youtube. It would be better if you had proper receptacles fitted ...


9

TL;DR Unless there is a major panel replacement needed, you're looking at hundreds to replace every receptacle and/or add GFCI protection, not thousands. The electrical code (NEC) and actual practice have evolved over many years. Ungrounded receptacles are not ideal, but are not inherently unsafe. If they were, then there would be no such thing as devices ...


8

There are three sockets: two are fed from black L-connection the third one with the switch symbol next to it is fed from orange/red A-connection. This can be used in conjunction with a switch in such a way that you can switch the one output on and off. Particularly useful with a built in switch right next to the socket I guess. Otherwise if you don't want ...


8

Not an ideal setup you have now, and you are correct to be doubtful about adding yet more load onto it. "Why hasn't it tripped the 16A breaker" comes down to "The ACTUAL load of your ACTUAL washing machine and dryer, and whether you use them in series (one after the other) or both at the same time (put a load in the dryer and start the washer ...


7

If it's a 4-prong receptacle, then you could do it. Though you'll have to swap out a breaker in the panel. This will leave you with a 20 ampere multi-wire branch circuit (MWBC), which can be used to supply countertop receptacles. If it's a 3-prong receptacle, there's likely not a grounding conductor. So it's not going to be a good idea, though there are ...


7

On many types of fixtures... You just unscrew the bulb! On those fixtures there is a small margin between the bezel and the flat lensed/Fresnel'd surface. That flat surface is the bulb. See, it looks like this... So how do you grab a flat flush bulb? Suction cup.


6

IF you have a "4-Prong" (Hot, Hot, Neutral, Ground) dryer outlet you could make (or perhaps "have made" would be safer depending on your skill level) a "plug-in sub-panel" that would take the (probably 30amp) 240V via a dryer plug, and divide it into two or four 15 or 20A GFCI-protected (GFCI and 20A is required for kitchen outlets) 120V outlets. This ...


6

Hex shank to square drive adapter This bit is a hex shank to square drive adapter, which allows you to use square drive bits with a drill/driver. Hex shank socket The second set of tools is hard to tell for sure what it is. If the sliver bit at the bottom has a hexagonal cutout in it, then they are hex shank sockets. If that's what they are, they allow you ...


6

You're comparing apples to oranges. You're using the power output, to try and determine the input. Without knowing about the transformer, and other circuitry, that's going to be quite difficult. According to the specification listed by the manufacturer The unit will draw about 1.4 amperes at 100-240 volts AC (VAC), which I'm assuming is the value when ...


6

I believe you're looking for an allen head ratchet set, like the one below. A trip to your local hardware or home improvement store might be in order so you can see some products to get a sense of whether or not they can fit in the small space you have before you make a purchase. (http://chapmanmfg.com/ , also available on Amazon) I've never used this ...


6

You need to connect to the center two wires in RJ-11. Since RJ-11 is usually 6 pins, these are pins 3 and 4. If yours has only 4 pins, these should be pins 2 and 3. Leave the other pins unconnected. Now, with regards to the colors (and correct polarity), this is country-dependent. Check this chart for reference. But, you can also try one way, and if it ...


6

That's the maximum rating for the plug. It doesn't change anything about the current in your attached device. If you exceed that current for some reason, the plug will open the circuit for protection.


5

The socket spring is sprung. The buzzing says you have arcing in there. Very bad news. I suspect the wire is getting loose because it's a type of connection we call a "back stab" where you jab the wire in a hole and a barbed spring grabs it, I bet that has also sprung. I would shut off the breaker and swap the outlets for quality grades. How do you ...


5

Google really did not want to help, because any such queries were glutted by travel adapters with all the different socket codes (A through J). Americans may note those cover only US NEMA 1 and 5, and don't cover NEMA 7, 15, L5, 23 and many others intended for heavy-duty use. That is the situation here. This socket is for heavy-duty loads. It is not ...


5

UPDATE - OCTOBER 26th 2019. The OP has now connected the neutral to ground at the power socket. This is against all advice from all people commenting. He is completely ignoring the advice supplied by everyone. He is wasting their time. People who do what this guy has done this will kill themselves and their friends. Don't be like this guy. ...


5

That can't be fixed, but it can be replaced. That ring snapped off the piece in the right side of your photo, it connects the threaded metal on the base of the bulb to one of the wire leads. There's no practical and reliable way to repair that thin formed sheet metal. Don't be fooled if you assemble it and it kind of works if you wiggle the bulb. The ...


5

I think it is in theory possible for a device like this to be designed and certified as a shaver socket in the UK. I don't think having output voltage of 5V (or 9, etc) would disqualify it. I do not however think this particular device has been designed or certified to "shaver socket" standards for use in a bathroom and I don't think such a thing ...


4

In this picture: The top bit is for driving sockets with, for example, a power drill. The bottom bits are for turning allen screws with a socket wrench. Such as this:


4

It all depends on how much you are willing to learn. If you are confident in your ability to do it safely, go for it. If not, do more research until you are or hire an electrician. Personally I am confident doing anything up to replacing a main electrical panel. That is something I would have to hire an electrician for, even though I could in theory do it, ...


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