Hot answers tagged

51

It's dangerous. You've spotted one important flaw but it can combine with others to make a really dangerous product. I originally suspected it was made in Europe by someone with more interest/knowledge in the sculptural aspect than the electrical one, but I've since spotted contact details in China for the seller. Either way it shouldn't be sold. Here's why ...


25

The safety solution is to either add a grounding using a grounded cord with the ground branching off and attaching to the metal as close to where it enters as possible. Or you can convert the lamp to low voltage LED with the 220 to 5 or 12V conversion external to it so safety ground isn't a requirement.


17

I want to install this simple Ikea lamp, but I'm dumbfounded by what is expected from me. Yeah, I can see why you might be. Honestly, I understand the original reason for picture-only instructions (they save money and paper when you're selling the same product in many countries with different languages), and I even understand that they've become a part of ...


15

That is a Heyco bushing. You need to squeeze, preferably with a needle-nose pliers, in what I would call a top-to-bottom position considering the orientation of how it is installed. If you squeeze just right it will come out no problem and will not damage the cord. Here is a decent video explanation: http://youtu.be/G1IWQB3mQrw Here is the manufacturer's ...


15

Due to the lack of adequate answers, I decided to research the differences myself and provide an answer to the benefit of the community. PAR Type Lamps From a build quality and light control standpoint, PAR type lamps are generally considered superior. The explicit parabolic nature of the reflector means light is more precisely reflected directly out of ...


12

I'm a big time movie Ask your best boy to handle this. ☺ I'm dumbfounded by what is expected from me. The light fitting apparently requires a hook in the ceiling. Am I at risk for being electrocuted? Yes. ⚡ Go to your main panel and turn off power to the light circuit. Test that power is off. Use a Cat-II (or better) rated test device. Test that ...


11

PAR = Parabolic Aluminized Reflector. The number is the diameter of the bulb times 8, so divide by 8 to get its diameter. Thus, a PAR30 is a 3.75" diameter bulb. Our last house had PAR30 floods in track lighting in the living room (a style that was all the rage when the house was built in the 1980s). You can use them indoors. The quality of light you get ...


9

Speedy's answer is an excellent one. I here want to add a picture of what these clips look like in the raw so that it is more apparent how they work. The groves along the areas pointed to by the red lines are those that grip to the inside edge of the hole in the lamp base and retain the cord. When you squeeze the clip, as Speedy explains, the clip ...


6

If it says 60 watts max, then the maximum wattage bulb you can safely use is 60 watts. If you could find a 3-way incandescent bulb like a 20-40-60, that would be safe. But I've never seen one that small. With such a low acceptable wattage, the lamp may have been designed with CFL or LED lamps in mind, you can get something like an 11-23-34 Watt CFL 3-way ...


5

It may be easier to make a post out of two 2x4's where you can use a router to cut in a V groove down the center of the face of each piece. The two V grooves facing each other would make a channel down the middle of the post. You may want to consider the use of a PVC conduit in the channel to eliminate the possibility of rusting. An easier procedure than ...


5

There is no need for wire nuts in any such appliance, and this is a design from someone clueless, and made in a shop that makes stuff for US markets. Nothing sold in Europe should ever have wire nuts in it - it's a clear giveaway. Unless you modify it to have double insulation or be properly grounded, and get rid of all the other design mistakes - I'd not ...


4

I just was looking for one a few weeks ago. I saw them under a few names "harp fitter", "spider fitter", or "lamp adjuster". I just got a new harp it was easier.


4

Open one leg of a paper clip and insert it into the little notch next to the wire. The wire should pop right out.


4

The easiest way to run an LED off of 120VAC is to use an LED that's already designed for 120VAC, like a 120VAC LED Panel light. They come in a wide variety of sizes, colors, and form factors. (Photos from Digikey's catalog). Just keep in mind that 120VAC is dangerous, and if you're not actually going to panel mount them where only the front of the LED is ...


4

Unless you need to move the lamp around, you may find it easier to get an outlet purpose made for this. You could google "Leviton T5632-W" for example. You can procure such a device through Amazon and other retailers. And they are already UL approved.


4

Yes - almost certainly. You need to get the wiring right (the wires should be colour coded in the usual way - if in doubt post pictures). The pins are in the same positions in both plugs. The 13A plug is fixed unlike the 5A. A fuse should be chosen to match the rating of the cord but you're unlikely to have that information. In that case just fit a 1A fuse ...


4

Nik, you need to install a piece of lumber (or some such support member) that is securely attached to joists, that spans the location where you want to attach the fixture. They make some ready-to-install gadgets for this also:


4

You identify the tube type, then the ballast. The fixture decides the tube The fixture and its lampholders are going to decide the size of tube you can use. Within that, you may have some flexibility. Start by looking at the fixture. Look at the length and shape of tube, and the lampholder sockets. Often, it's totally obvious, like the ubiquitous 48" ...


4

Pendant lamp holder or Pendant socket (or perhaps Pendant lamp socket, you never can tell what mixture of words will work best when there's a choice.) That's a very typical stock design with the large threads to hold the shade. As Ed says, you replace the whole thing. If you can't find one with threads on the back end (since pendant can mean "hanging by a ...


4

They're called cinematic gels They are just a gray filter that you put over the LED. You can also get color-tinted, if you are trying to white-balance with other lights. But a light one, and if you need more dimming, add layers.


4

You might consider a dimmer switch that has a "slider" that is separated from the switch. This would be completely code legal, give you the convenience of setting the dimming level once and then just use the switch. You'd also have the flexibility to adjust it easily if your needs change. Just make sure whatever dimmer you choose is compatible with your ...


4

Devices should be listed and approved by a recognized testing agency / authority, such as UL (Underwriter Laboratories). Anything that doesn't carry an approval rating by such an agency is potentially dangerous and should not be used. Some great answers point out what's wrong with the design of the lamp, but an easy way to always stay safe is, always look ...


3

It's impossible to say for sure without inspecting the lamp, but it sounds like a bad CFL. Have you already checked to be sure that the bulb is screwed in securely? You could use a multimeter to check for continuity through all of the wires to the socket (which can be difficult when trying to find an intermittent connection since digital multimeters ...


3

I worked in a real lighting store for several years in my teens and early 20's. I was responsible for many purchase orders, quite a few from the likes of Angelo and Wn DeSherbenin. That piece is crimped onto the harp. I have never seen it available separately. You simply need to replace the harp.


3

It is great to begin woodworking with a custom made project that fits your needs. Often doing it yourself can result in a significant savings, but I think you may find that purchasing the components for the lamp may well cost more than the amount they are asking. But your version will be the size and finish you want. For the linen panels, you could try ...


3

First off you do not want to hang the light by the socket that you purchased. With the poke in holes for the wires this is NOT an acceptable mounting system for your lamp - heavy glass or not. Next note that the wire used to hang lamps is a special type that has strengthing cord built into the cable. The conventional hanging lamp fixture has a two piece ...


3

There probably isn't anything you can buy that does this for a residential application, but it's done all the time in industrial plants, like this: As the drawing suggests, make good and sure that you're only using ONE phase. In other words, don't put the switch on one phase and the timer on the other, wire them together, and expect them to work. Call an ...


3

It sounds like a light switch with a built-in programmable timer would meet your needs. Here is an example of one that turns on at preset times for under $25: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004SOZHXY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1435319450&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SY200_QL40&keywords=timer+switch&dpPl=1&dpID=31IbSTB9PVL&ref=plSrch. I have a similar ...


3

How do I connect these pin bulbs to the mains - any special holders? transformers, etc? You can buy G4 sockets with trailing wires, these have mounting holes that can be screwed or bolted, or you could probably glue them in place with a heat-resistant glue. The trailing wires would have to be connected using a 230V connector block. These sort of parts are ...


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