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8

Is this ceiling fan going to fall? There is nothing in the photo that tells me a fall is about to happen, but the installation looks poor, and I think you need to get under that cover. Will it cut your head off? No, if the physical support let’s go, it will dangle by it’s wiring like a wounded buzzard, but probably give you time to get clear. A bonk with a ...


7

Okay, stop. The 10-32 screw requirement is for the lower screws which attach the fan to the box, not the upper screws which attach the box to the wood. You can see the holes that the 10-32 screws go into, in those tiny squares to left and right of your photo. It's entirely possible those squares do something clever, like capture a nut. But they are ...


4

This problem is most easily addressed by surface mount wireway. Rather than run exposed cables, you attach a fairly innocuous plastic or metal rectangular cross section wireway/duct/conduit that carries the cables across the ceiling and/or wall in a less obtrusive way than putting them out in the open, but which does not require major surgery to the building ...


3

No. Your roof is built to minimal height standards for cost, insulation, travel height, wind handling, etc. You basically have ceiling joists, a relatively small space for insulation, and the roof. There's no extra height available there. You will need to raise the upper roof surface to make room for livable space below. Here's a short list of things that ...


2

It depends on what you are willing to accept. Kitchens are often painted with a sheen, which will highlight any imperfections. The visibility of imperfections also depends on the lighting. Even the most skilled plasterer is bound to have left a bump, wrinkle, holiday, or ripple somewhere. If you can live with being occasionally reminded that you skipped ...


2

Ceilings require 5/8" or 1/2" no-sag for 24" joist span. If you're able to screw it at 16" intervals or use adhesive between joists you could use standard 1/2". I wouldn't use 3/8" unless you have backing at 12" intervals or run adhesive between joists. 1/4" just isn't appropriate for a ceiling. Update: For 16" ...


1

Of course you can raise the roof. Given unlimited budget you can raise the roof, install marble floors, and have a fireplace on each end. Is raising the roof on a mobile home a good idea? F@@k no. Honestly it is a good thought. I grew up part of my life in a mobile home and grandmother owned a mobile park. I get the ceiling issue. But most of these ...


1

Much depends on your situation (park lot rental .vs. own land, very different) but I will guarantee that building an add-on room with more height (and more space, yay!) would be far less trouble and expense than trying to "raise the roof" on a mobile home. The structure is already "just barely adequate" and modifying it is a huge ...


1

Don't even worry about asbestos, it's only a concern if you tear it up into a breathable dust. You say you are concerned about water intrusion, but all around that area there are gaps and cracks through which water could penetrate. You say you are worried about mold, but the wall above is covered with what looks like bio growth (mildew). I recommend that you:...


1

I doubt if you’ll be able to add an upstairs room without a special variance from your Building Department. There are several issues: 1) Its a structural change so you’ll need a Building Permit, 2) the Code requires a minimum ceiling height, 3) minimum floor area required for habitable rooms, 4) window required in habitable rooms and if it’s a sleeping room, ...


1

In order of preference I'd probably call these folks: A trusted handyperson (likely least expensive) An insulation contractor (likely most knowledgeable, but more expensive) A building or remodeling contractor (certainly capable, but probably most expensive) You don't really need any particular credentials. You just need someone with a brain in their head ...


1

Look at all the parts that come with the fan and read the instructions. The newer Hunter fans with sealed bearings (not oil bath) come with special engineered wood screws for the fan bracket which are designed (strong and long) to go into a ceiling joist. If your fan has those, then they would go through two holes in the box or outside the box. The box ...


1

First of all, those drywall screws are not "10-32", use what's specified or something similar. Secondly, you don't know what's supporting the wood that the box is attached to. Get up into the attic and inspect it to make sure it's secure.


1

First things first. Get yourself a structural engineer or an architect. Contractors might have 30 years of experience but all they've got is a "hunch", and what has worked in the past. A licensed professional works with your states actual loading criteria, and designs to it. If you remove the ceiling joists, its like removing the bottom leg of a ...


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