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7

You could attach blocking to the joists on both sides of the existing electrical box and bracing, etc. By attaching the blocking vertically, you will maximize the weight capacity, but by attaching horizontally you can provide a larger area to "hit" with the mounting hardware. Both orientations should support the weight adequately. Sections of 2x4 ...


4

I'm not an expert on this but that ceiling looks pretty bad. Your big mistake was getting a painter to repair the ceiling and not a plasterer. Painters can patch but doing an entire ceiling takes a special skill set. You can try sanding the living hell out of it to smooth it out or get someone who specialized in plastering.


4

Update after seeing the fixture image: There's no need to bolt the box to the support framing other than to secure it in position. Nothing hangs from the box (so it doesn't even need to be fan-rated). I would still run the 2x10 over the box, and I'd add blocking on each side of the box to bring it down flush with the adjacent joists. This will give you solid ...


3

Agree with @r13 . Joists almost always are necessary to stop the roof from pushing the walls outward. If you dislike them, consider "scissors joists" which tie the walls to the roof joists on the opposite side of the peak. This gives you a slightly lower cathedral ceiling but eliminates the joists/beams running in mid-air.


2

This is what I would do personally: I would get a 2x8 or larger, cut it to fit the width, cut a notch to fit the box, the fasten that between the joists. Make sure you cut the width of that to fit as snugly as possible without having to excessively force it in, gentle tapping with your fist is ideal. Put 3 or so screws such as these DeckMate screws on each ...


2

That appears to be where the joint was drywall taped and filled with drywall joint compound. Moisture or movement could cause this to happen. Is the home air conditioned. To repair it you need to clean out the original joint, tape it and fill with drywall joint compound and sand it smooth. This is a very messy process. I went through that many years ago, ...


2

Yes that wall has the appearance of being a bearing wall: the header above the doorway is solid joists terminate on top of the wall, especially with no hangers to the other joist That first living room joist as it stands now is almost certainly not up to the task of carrying the loads of all these kitchen joists. That said, all hope is not lost -- it'll ...


2

I suggest running a 2x header between the joist and level with the junction box. Then hanging the fixture on the eyebolts that fastened on the 2x. It will be much sturdy.


2

I'll pick USG Ultralight Sheetrock, since it's probably the lightest on the market. Their specs say 1.25lbs per square foot. If you hang 4.5' x 12' sheets (pretty standard), that's 67.5 lbs per sheet. Probably 70-ish after fasteners, tape, mud, etc. In all honesty, if your ceiling joists can't handle that weight, I'd say you have much larger issues. Your ...


1

You'll want to remove any crumbling plaster. There's probably lath strips up there so just mix up some plaster and fill in the area. Any gouges in the ceiling can be filled in with plaster. I'd be against using any type of glue mixture to stabilize crumbling plaster. You wouldn't then be able to sand it smooth and paint probably wouldn't stick to it. That's ...


1

I just had a new vent installed in my office. The boot was nailed in with 4 roofing nails. They ran flex duct to it, so that's held on with a gigantic zip tie. Yours may have rigid duct leading to it (depends a lot on how old the house it and when the HVAC was last redone), and if that's the case, the boot is also screwed to the duct from the outside with at ...


1

That looks like a "bagged" finish. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fPRLo_7OFA just applied in a pattern instead of over the whole surface.


1

Two (and perhaps a third) options I'd consider (I run cables professionally, and I hate poking those installer bits into places I can't see and praying they don't find something they should not hit...) Measure carefully from the walls and line your holes up that way. Above, move the insulation, do the work, replace the insulation and get the floor installed....


1

Buy a "cable installer" drill bit. Here in the US they're offered in a variety of diameters and lengths of 30 cm to 2 m. Drill through both layers of ceiling in a single go, tape the cable or a string to the drill, and pull it back through the holes. Chances of drilling through without hitting anything important are reasonably good. You can ...


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