Hot answers tagged

42

You could install a circular ceiling medallion over the hole and run the light fixture through the middle of it. This would avoid having to match the paint of the surrounding ceiling. Or here's an even simpler, 10", white trim piece.


15

Like any other repair to sheetrock/plasterboard/drywall. Turn power off (the breaker, not the switch) to the fixture and drop the trim out of your way. Either cut out a larger area and make a large patch, or add some wood strips behind and fit a small patch, then fill the joints (force joint compound into them with a small drywall knife), tape, and mud (...


3

You have a piece of dry wall joint tape that is coming loose, The good thing in your case this is not popcorn texture. Popcorn texture is very much different than what you have And that’s a good thing because most contain asbestos. Your texture is a light orange peal with several coats of paint. To me this looks like it has been repaired previously note how ...


2

With both arrangements you have hangers attached to main tees on a 4 foot grid so the overall weight capacity is equal. I'll suggest the arrangement of the 4 foot cross tees between the main tees is a matter of preference and installer convenience. In my limited observation of ceilings, the nested arrangement seems more common than the "all cross tees ...


2

The simplest thing to do is install strapping - 1" x 3" furring strips that run perpendicular to the joists. This makes drywall installation a lot easier, gives you a wider surface for joints, and lets you use thinner cheaper easier-to-handle drywall without it sagging. Strapping is used a lot in some areas of the US and seldom seen in others. I ...


1

Evidently you took out a wall that was used as a bearing wall for the ceiling joists that are turned perpendicular and are not connected to the intersected joist. The few that are tied to the intersecting ones are there just to control the sag of the last one so it does not put a dip in the ceiling right where the wall is that you took out. It was all ...


1

Millions of homes have engineered truss roof systems (and floor systems, for that matter) on 24" centers. 5/8" or 1/2" "no-sag" drywall have done fine for almost half a century. If you're concerned about waste, drywall is cheap (in most locations). You'll only need 5 or 6 sheets anyway. If you got creative you'd maybe save one sheet, ...


1

One stock approach is to use hat channel AKA resilient channel, at right angles to the joists, 16" on center. Of course, that drops the ceiling an inch or so depending on the channel type (channel screws to the joists on the flange with screws for wood, drywall screws to the channel with screws for metal. It provides some sound isolation as well as a ...


1

Install a suspended ceiling. attach eye anchors to the masonry and use wires to suport the channel which supports the drywall pack your batts above the channels then attach the rigid foam and the drywall using screws.


1

That just looks like standard “mud”. The common ceiling texture that is known to contain asbestos is “popcorn texture” not what you have. I doubt it contains asbestos but the date the work was done and the location would also help. if the home was built after 1984 in the US I would not worry about it but testing is the only way to know for sure.


1

As you add more facets it comes to resemble a bow (or bowstring) truss. Those, of course, have internal triangular structure to make them a truss, so they are (very) stable, and their "ultimate" form is to actually have curved top members, rather than straight-line segments.


1

If the mold is coming from humidity in the air, I would kill the mold with a 1:10 chlorine bleach solution and water, undiluted white vinegar, or use a commercial product made for killing black mold. Rinse, let it dry, and don't worry about stains. Use Kilz paint primer to paint over the stains. It is a pretty good product and covers over mold and other ...


1

Shape, location, and wiring but not pipe strongly suggest that they are heat detectors - part of a fire alarm system (whether or not that's an active alarm system, you get to find out somehow.) Modern ones tend to be "sleeker" and combined with smoke detectors, but this is a fairly common form for older ones. They are useful for locations that have ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible